When Should Baby Visit the Dentist for the First Time?

Medical review policy, latest update:, when to schedule baby's first dental visit, how to choose a dentist for your child, read this next, what happens at baby's first dentist visit, tips to make your child’s dentist visit easier, how often to visit the dentist.

Based on how your toddler’s teeth look, your dentist will let you know when to make the next visit. Most experts recommend that toddlers see the dentist about every six months — as long as there are no major problems. So don’t forget to schedule your child’s second appointment on your way out the door!

What to Expect the First Year , 3rd Edition, Heidi Murkoff. What to Expect the Second Year , Heidi Murkoff. WhatToExpect.com, Toddler Dental Care , March 2019. WhatToExpect.com, Is Your Toddler Teething? , April 2020. WhatToExpect.com, Preventing Cavities and Keeping Baby's Teeth Healthy , April 2020. WhatToExpect.com, Brushing Baby's Teeth , July 2020. American Academy of Pediatrics, Baby's First Tooth: 7 Facts Parents Should Know , November 2020. American Academy of Pediatrics, Good Oral Health Starts Early , November 2020 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Frequently Asked Questions , 2021. American Dental Association, Taking Care of Your Child’s Smile , May 2014.

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A Child's First Dental Visit Fact Sheet

When should your child first see a dentist? You can take your child at a younger age, but experts recommend taking him or her within 6 months of the first tooth coming in (erupting), or by about 12 months at the latest.

At this time, the dentist can give you information on:

Baby bottle tooth decay

Infant feeding practices

Mouth cleaning

Pacifier habits

Finger-sucking habits

Prepare your child

If possible, schedule morning appointments so young children are alert and fresh.

Prepare a preschooler or older child for the visit by giving him or her a general idea of what to expect. Explain why it is important to go to the dentist. Build excitement and understanding.

Prepare yourself

Discuss your questions and concerns with the dentist. Remember that your feeling toward dental visits can be quite different from your child's. Be honest with your view of the dentist. If you have dental anxieties, be careful not to relate those fears or dislikes to your child. Parents need to give moral support by staying calm while in the dental exam room. Children can pick up parents' anxieties and become anxious themselves.

Prepare the dentist

At the first visit, give the dentist your child's complete health history. For a restoration visit, such as getting a cavity filled, tell the dentist if your child tends to be stubborn, defiant, anxious, or fearful in other situations.

Watch how your child reacts. Many parents are able to guess how their child will respond and should tell the dentist. Certain behaviors may be linked to your child's age:

10 to 24 months. Some securely attached children may get upset when taken from their parents for an exam.

2 to 3 years. A securely attached child may be able to cope with a brief separation from parents. In a 2-year-old, "no" may be a common response.

3 years. Three-year-olds may not be OK being apart from a parent when having a dental procedure such as getting a cavity filled. This is because most 3-year-olds are not socially mature enough to separate from parents.

4 years. Most children should be able to sit in another room from parents for exams and treatment procedures.

The first visit

Your child's first dental visit is to help your child feel comfortable with the dentist. The first dental visit is recommended by 12 months of age, or within 6 months of the first tooth coming in. The first visit often lasts 30 to 45 minutes. Depending on your child's age, the visit may include a full exam of the teeth, jaws, bite, gums, and oral tissues to check growth and development. If needed, your child may also have a gentle cleaning. This includes polishing teeth and removing any plaque, tartar, and stains. The dentist may show you and your child proper home cleaning such as flossing, and advise you on the need for fluoride. Baby teeth fall out, so X-rays aren’t often done. But your child's dentist may recommend X-rays to diagnose decay, depending on your child's age. X-rays are also used to see if the root of a jammed baby tooth may be affecting an adult tooth. In general, it is best that young children not have dental X-rays unless absolutely needed.

The second visit

Just like adults, children should see the dentist every 6 months. Some dentists may schedule visits more often, such as every 3 months. This can build comfort and confidence in the child. More frequent visits can also help keep an eye on a development problem.

Protect your children's teeth at home

 Here are some tips to protect your children's teeth:

Before teeth come in, clean gums with a clean, damp cloth.

Start brushing with a small, soft-bristled toothbrush and a very small amount of toothpaste (the size of a grain of rice) when your child's first tooth appears. Use a pea-sized dab of fluoridated toothpaste after 3 years of age. This is when the child is old enough to spit out the toothpaste after brushing.

Prevent baby bottle tooth decay. Don't give children a bottle of milk, juice, or sweetened liquid at bedtime or when put down to nap.

Limit the time your child has a bottle. Your child should empty a bottle in 5 to 6 minutes or less.

Help your child brush his or her own teeth until age 7 or 8. Have the child watch you brush, and follow the same brushing pattern to reduce missed spots.

Limit foods and treats that increase tooth decay. This includes hard or sticky candies, fruit leather, and sweetened drinks and juice. Offer fruit rather than juice. The fiber in fruit tends to scrape the teeth clean. Juice just exposes the teeth to sugar.

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How to Prepare Your Child for Their First Dental Visit

Verywell / Madelyn Goodnight

What to Expect

Choosing a dentist.

  • Getting Ready For The Visit

Preparing as a Parent

One of the most frequently asked questions I get as a Pediatric Dentist is, “When should I bring my baby in for their first dental visit?”

The Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child should visit the dentist when the first tooth appears or no later than their first birthday. While it may sound early, starting at that age will start your baby on a path for great oral health and prevent a number of dental problems that can occur during childhood.

The first visit gives parents a chance to become educated on how to properly care for their child's teeth and gives children a chance to become comfortable with the dental environment at an early age.

At the first visit, the dentist will examine your baby's mouth to make sure everything is growing and developing properly and will check for dental caries, tongue ties, and any signs of injuries.

The dentist will typically tell you everything you need to know to keep your child's teeth healthy including:

  • What kind of toothpaste and toothbrush to use
  • Brushing and flossing techniques
  • How to relieve teething discomfort
  • Which foods and drinks cause cavities
  • Answers to questions about pacifier use and thumb-sucking.

The examination and cleaning itself can take just a few minutes, but most of the time is spent on making the child feel comfortable and educating the parents. You should not expect the overall visit to take a long time.

The first step is finding a Pediatric Dentist for your child. Pediatric Dentists have two to three additional years of training after dental school during which they extensively study child development, behavior management of patients from infancy to adolescence, and how best to work with special needs children.

Most Pediatric Dentists will aim to provide a fun environment with toys, stickers, TVs, games, yummy flavored toothpaste, and staff that enjoy working with children. When children are having fun, they gain trust in the dentist and staff, and will often enjoy their visits and look forward to their next appointment.

Where to Find a Dentist

To find a Pediatric Dentist in your area, you can Google nearby pediatric dentists, talk to other parents you know for recommendations, and ask your child's pediatrician or your own dentist. If you have dental insurance, you can search for a Pediatric Dentist through your list of participating providers.

Getting Ready For Your Child's Visit

When you have decided on an office, call them to schedule a visit. Young children tend to do their best in the morning when they are fresh and full of energy. Avoid scheduling appointments late in the day or close to nap times when children can be groggy or cranky.

You can inquire if it is possible for you and your child to come to the office for a tour and to meet the doctor before the actual day of the checkup. If your child has any special needs, discuss it with the staff member that schedules your appointment. The dentist will often want a little extra time scheduled for this.

If there is something in particular that keeps your child calm and happy (a song they like to hear, a video they like to watch or simply a color they like), let the dentist know so they can try to incorporate that into the visit.

Mental Preparation

Once you have an appointment scheduled, start preparing your child for the visit. Children learn best when they are having fun. You can practice giving their stuffed animal a checkup with a toy mirror.

Your child can bring that same stuffed animal to the dental visit to get a check-up by the dentist. Read books to them. I recommend:

  • Show Me Your Smile! A Visit to the Dentist (Dora the Explorer)
  • Dentist Trip (Peppa Pig)
  • Elmo Visits the Dentist by P.J. Shaw

You can also watch one of the many YouTube videos about going to the dentist, such as Daniel Tiger's .

Put Them At Ease

When talking to your child about their upcoming trip to the dentist, you can assure them that there are no shots at this visit and that the dentist will simply examine and brush their teeth and talk to them about how to keep their teeth healthy.

Let them know that the dentist will show them all of the tools and explain all of the procedures before starting. You can also plan a treat (not candy or junk food) such as a trip to the park or toy store should they need a little extra motivation.

Anticipating Follow Up Visits

Once you've completed your first visit, it's time to start preparing your child for their second visit! Discuss the visit with your child and remind them of the positive things that happened such as:

  • There were no shots
  • Nothing hurt
  • The toothpaste tasted great
  • The toothbrush tickled
  • The dentist counted all of your teeth and now we know how many teeth you have
  • You got prizes and a new toothbrush at the end
  • Next time we go there, we'll get these fun prizes all over again!

To prepare yourself, come on time, if possible a few minutes earlier to fill out any registration and consent forms that may be needed. Many offices have their registration forms on their website so you can fill them out in advance.

Give your dentist a complete health history of your child. If your child is taking any medications, have a list of the medications and dosages. Have your child's pediatrician's contact information available.

If you have any particular questions that you want the dentist to address, write them down so you don't forget to ask them if the dentist doesn't bring those topics up.

It is also important to have reasonable expectations of your child. During the visit, some children may open their mouths willingly and enjoy the experience, while some will not, just as some do not enjoy getting haircuts or wearing seatbelts. Luckily, with preparation and sticking to a regular recall schedule (typically every six months), the visits will get easier and more enjoyable each time.

Many children that may start out fearful or anxious can become patients that love going to the dentist once they've been a few times.  

By Rashmi Ambewadikar, DDS  Rashmi Ambewadikar, DDS is a pediatric dentist practicing in Queens, New York and is the owner of Astoria Smiles Pediatric Dentistry. 

WonderBaby.org

Helping Your Baby Reach Greater Wonders

Making Baby’s First Dental Visit a Happy Milestone

Sarah Claywell

  • Plan to take your baby to their first dental visit by age one. 
  • There are five steps you can take to prepare for your baby’s first visit. 
  • Going to the dentist is a great way to get your child excited about brushing. 
  • Comfort, positivity, reminders, and touch can all help your child through the first dental visit. 

As a common fear, even for some adults, going to the dentist doesn’t exactly evoke warm and fuzzy feelings. I was especially worried about this with my daughter, who very early on made routine pediatrician appointments feel like a wrestling match. To my surprise, she actually enjoyed her first dental appointment. No joke (or wrestling)!

If that sounds like an impossible task, let me change your mind with a full-blown breakdown of your baby’s first dental visit. From what to expect to how to prepare, stay put to learn how to make your baby’s first dental visit a happy milestone!

When Should Babies Have Their First Dental Visit?

Dentist examines the teeth of a newborn baby.

Babies should have their first dental visit by the time they’re one year old. Another rule of thumb is to have their first appointment no more than six months after you see their first tooth come in. I know it might seem like it’s way too early to start, but the truth is it’s critical to maintaining their first teeth.

Suchitra Nelson wrote in the study, Do baby teeth really matter? Changing parental perception and increasing dental care utilization for young children 1 1. Nelson, S., Slusar, M. B., Albert, J. M., & Riedy, C. A.. Do baby teeth really matter? Changing parental perception and increasing dental care utilization for young children. Contemporary Clinical Trials . 2017;59, 13–21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2017.05.002 , that “Unlike other medical illnesses, childhood dental caries is entirely preventable with adequate self-management strategies by parent/caregivers that include regular preventive dental care and appropriate oral hygiene habits.”

This regular preventative dental care, Nelson states, allows the dentist the all-important task of checking your child’s teeth for tooth decay, pacifier teeth , defects, or anything that may require extra care or examination. Your baby’s first dental visit also establishes their dental care and begins getting them used to the process of dental visits.

How to Prepare for Your Baby’s First Dental Visit

A doctor in uniform checks a child mouth with a mirror.

Preparation is key to a successful first dental visit. If you’re not sure where to start, here are some ideas of what you can do to help things go smoothly the day of:

  • Find a Dentist: An obvious point, I know, but it’s worth mentioning for the simple fact that not all medical professionals are created equal. Find a pediatric dentistry with a good bedside manner that goes above and beyond to welcome your child. 
  • Talk It Up: This part is critical. Talking about going to the first appointment in an exciting way not only put my daughter in the right frame of mind, but it didn’t catch her off guard when the time came for us to go. 
  • Demonstrate the Process: If talking the process through isn’t interesting to them, try other resources like books or videos about the dentist. Seeing everything firsthand can be very disarming!
  • Take a Tour: It’s always a great idea to take your child on a tour of the dental office; that way, their first time in the office isn’t on the day of their first appointment. They may take some comfort in the familiarity. 
  • Schedule Carefully: As with other appointments, things usually go better when your child is well-rested. Pick an appointment time either early in the morning after they wake or after a good long nap. 

What to Expect During Your Baby’s First Dental Visit

At your child’s first dental visit, you can expect to be there for no more than 45 minutes. Their dentist will conduct a regular exam which includes checking your baby’s teeth for tooth decay, pacifier teeth, gum condition, and bite. If they think it necessary, they may do a gentle cleaning and polish too. Unless there’s an issue, you shouldn’t expect X-rays since their baby teeth will eventually fall out. 

During this visit, the dental assistant and the dentist alike are great at getting your little one excited about maintaining their oral health, too, giving them a careful demonstration of cleaning techniques. This worked wonders with my daughter! She was all about trying to brush precisely how the dentist showed her after her first appointment. 

Also, don’t be afraid to use this time to ask questions! Maybe you’re wondering why your baby’s teeth are coming through in the wrong order or how their thumb-sucking might affect their mouth over time. Now is the time to ask.

Tips to Help Your Baby Feel Comfortable During The First Dental Visit

Dentist examining boy's teeth in clinic.

Your little one may feel a bit nervous during their first appointment, but there are plenty of ways you can make them feel comfortable from start to finish. 

  • Bring Comfort: If your little one has a favorite stuffed animal , blanket, or toy, consider bringing it along to the first appointment. It’ll bring them some comfort and maybe even act as a tool for demonstrating procedures to them. 
  • Be Positive: Babies often look to their parents to confirm whether or not certain situations are okay, reading their facial expressions and tone. Be a source of positive reinforcement with each step of the dental exam. 
  • Remind Them: If you prepared them for the appointment by explaining the process, reading a book, watching a video, or whatever you choose, remind them of those demonstrations. Recalling them might calm their nerves.
  • Physical Touch: Whether their dentist allows your child to do a simple lap exam or they prefer them to sit in the dental chair, any physical separation can be distressing to them in a new scenario. Offer as much physical touch as you can, whether it be holding their hand or just keeping your hand on their arm or leg. 

What are some signs that my baby may have dental problems that need to be addressed?

The easiest sign to spot would be a rejection of foods they usually enjoy or visible pain when they try to chew. Irritation from particularly hot or cold foods or drinks may also be a sign of tooth pain. Any swelling of the gums or jaw, tooth discoloration, bad breath, or even ulcers are all signs to consult your little one’s pediatric dentist as soon as possible. 

How often should my baby have dental check-ups after the first visit?

As with adults, babies should continue to be seen every six months after their first dental visit. It’s essential to stick with that schedule even if your child receives good reports at every appointment. A missed dentist appointment could mean a missed issue that could have been easier to take care of from the get-go.

  • Nelson, S., Slusar, M. B., Albert, J. M., & Riedy, C. A. (2017). Do baby teeth really matter? Changing parental perception and increasing dental care utilization for young children. Contemporary Clinical Trials , 59 , 13–21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2017.05.002

Making Baby's First Dental Visit a Happy Milestone

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Your Baby's First Dental Visit

Your baby is hitting new milestones every day, and his or her first dental visit is another one to include in the baby book!

Your child’s first dental visit should take place after that first tooth appears , but no later than the first birthday. Why so early? As soon as your baby has teeth , he or she can get cavities. Being proactive about your child’s dental health today can help keep his or her smile healthy for life. (Need a dentist? Use our Find-A-Dentist tool to find one in your area.)

How to Prepare

Moms and dads can prepare, too. When making the appointment, it can’t hurt to ask for any necessary patient forms ahead of time. It may be quicker and easier for you to fill them out at home instead of at the office on the day of your visit.

Make a list of questions, as well. If your child is teething , sucking his or her thumb  or using a pacifier  too much, your dentist can offer some advice.

What to Expect During the Visit

If your child cries a little or wiggles during the exam, don’t worry. It’s normal, and your dental team understands this is a new experience for your child!

Tips for a Great Visit

  • Don’t schedule an appointment during naptime. Instead, pick a time your child is usually well-rested and cooperative.
  • Make sure your child has had a light meal and brushes their teeth before their appointment so they won’t be hungry during their visit.
  • Save snacks for after the visit so they aren’t on your child’s teeth during the exam.
  • Think of the appointment as a happy and fun experience. If your child becomes upset during the visit, work with your dentist to calm your child. You’re on the same team!

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How to Prepare for Your Child's First Dental Visit

Top articles, more articles.

Medically Reviewed By Colgate Global Scientific Communications

Whether your baby's first tooth popped up this week or your toddler's finally ready to sit still for the dentist, you made your child's first dental appointment. Hooray! The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends scheduling a dental visit as soon as the child's first tooth appears. Still, it's never too late to take your kid to see the dentist. After you've completed the hard work of finding a kid-friendly dentist , you might wonder how to best prepare for your child's first dental visit. Check out these three simple steps and learn what you can expect once your kid's in the dental chair.

Step 1: Schedule the Dental Appointment

Try to schedule your child's first dentist appointment when they will be the least fussy, and make sure they are well-rested and fed before you arrive. While making the appointment, you can also ask about completing health history forms in advance and if the office will need any additional information to help limit the time waiting in the office. A quick call to your dental insurance provider can also confirm your coverage and determine if there will be any additional copays.

Step 2: Prepare for the Dental Appointment

A child's first dental visit should not be a surprise. Take some time to talk to your child about what will happen at the appointment. You can also read books or watch a television show about a friendly dental visit to help them visualize what it will be like. If your child is older, you can make a pretend trip to the dentist and practice opening their mouth wide to count their teeth. For more ambitious parents, the internet provides a variety of crafts to teach your children the importance of taking care of your teeth. Parents can also prepare for a child's first visit by completing any paperwork, writing down the child's medications, and making a list of any questions.

Step 3: Make the Dental Appointment Fun

Keeping a positive attitude and talking excitedly about the dental visit will go a long way in making your child feel comfortable instead of scared. However, if you sense your child is nervous, bring along a stuffed animal friend. The "friend" — or an older sibling — can go first, and the dental professional can demonstrate what will happen next or answer any of the child's questions. If your child still has dental anxiety , there are many things you can do to make them feel safe. Many dentists will provide a reward at the end of the appointment, but you may also want to pack a treat. Stickers, a new toothbrush, or a small toy all make great rewards.

What to Expect at Your Baby's First Dental Appointment

Depending on how comfortable — or wiggly — your child is, they may sit directly in the chair or in your lap. The dentist will check their jaw, teeth, and gums for proper development, cavities, or other issues. Either the dentist or dental hygienist will clean the child's teeth and provide education on how to properly take care of your child's teeth and gums. At the end of the appointment, the dentist can answer any questions you may have — from pacifier use to the best nutrition for healthy teeth.

Setting a positive precedent for dental appointments at an early age can help children create lifelong oral hygiene habits. By following these steps and taking the time to prepare for your child's first dental visit, you can help your child enjoy the dentist and look forward to future appointments.

Oral Care Center articles are reviewed by an oral health medical professional. This information is for educational purposes only. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist, physician or other qualified healthcare provider. 

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first dentist visit baby

Your Baby’s First Dental Visit

What will happen at the first dental visit.

  • Your child will sit in your lap
  • The parent will sit facing the dentist or dental hygienist.
  • The child will lie facing you with his or her head in the dentist or dental hygienist’s lap.
  • You will be able to hold hands with and talk to your child.
  • Your child may fuss or cry, but that is ok. It makes it easier to see inside the baby’s mouth. The exam will be over in just a few minutes.
  • Click here to read more about the Age 1 dental visit.

If your child is older, he or she may sit in the dental chair for a gentle exam

During your visit, the dentist or hygienist may:.

  • Clean your child’s teeth
  • Provide a fluoride treatment
  • Perform an x-ray
  • Make suggestions on how to best care for your child’s mouth
  • Schedule you for your child’s next appointment

Getting and Losing Teeth

When teeth start to appear.

  • Baby teeth usually start to appear between 4-7 months of age. The lower teeth usually come in first. Once your baby’s teeth appear, it is time to start brushing them with a smear of fluoride toothpaste on an infant sized toothbrush. A smear of toothpaste is the size of a grain of rice.
  • At 4 years old, your child’s jaw and facial bones will likely grow to make space between the baby teeth so that adult teeth have room to come in.

Losing Teeth

  • Between the ages of 6 and 12 years, your child will start losing baby teeth. During these years, your child’s smile will have both adult and baby teeth. When teeth fall out, they can fall out in any order.
  • Tooth Eruption Chart

Adult Teeth

  • Usually the middle teeth (central incisors) are the first to come out around age 6 to 7 years.
  • The ones on the sides of the middle teeth (lateral incisors) come out around age 7 or 8.
  • Molars and canines can be lost at any time after age 8, and will be gone by age 9 to 12.
  • Around age 12 years, your child will have a set of 28 permanent, adult teeth.
  • Be sure to inspect your child’s teeth for signs of decay. If you see something that concerns you, call a dentist right away.

FTFT is funded by the  Sadie & Harry Davis Foundation ,  Northeast Delta Dental  and the US Department of Health and Human Services,  Health Resources and Services Administration .

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Your Baby’s First Dental Visit

Happiest Baby Staff

You and your baby managed to survive the first round of teething ! Congratulations! But what do you do now that your precious nugget’s adorable little first chompers have finally emerged? Yes, brush them, but are dental visits really in the cards already? If you’re unsure you’re not alone! Here’s your guide to when to make that first appointment…and what to expect once you get there. 

When do children need to visit the dentist for the first time?

Sooner than you think! Both the   American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend that your kiddo be examined by a dentist soon after their first tooth erupts…or within six months of their first birthday. Unfortunately, studies show that the average age when children actually first visit the dentist is three years old!

Perhaps this is because some parents are confused as to why a baby would need to see a dentist when their smile is only sporting one or two teeth . Here’s why:

Quells fears. When children visit the dentist early, they learn not to fear the dentist, which makes those future appointments go smoother.

Learn about dental care. Tots can learn early dental care habits that’ll help keep their teeth clean, healthy, and—fingers crossed—cavity-free.

Spot problems early. When dentists catch potential problems early, they can intervene before those issues become more serious.

Do children need to see a pediatric dentist?

Need? No. General dentists who enjoy kids can be a perfect fit. Just know that a pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and they only treat the smallest of patients. General dentists have about five weeks of training in treating kids.

How to prepare for your baby or toddler’s first dental visit:

Here’s the thing: Your tot has no reason to fear the dentist…they ’ ve never visited one before! So, it’s up to you to set the stage for a positive experience. Here are some ways to do just that:

Get the timing right. Choose an appointment time for when your child is at their most alert, happy...and well fed. That means it’s best to avoid the dentist during nap or feeding times, when kiddos will likely be hungry and fussy.

Call ahead. Waiting is hard for little ones. Before you head out the door, make sure your dentist is on schedule.

Give a preview. If your child is old enough, talk about what they can expect, like the cool dental chair that goes up in the air and the fun sunglasses they get to wear. You can also play dentist at home, so your child can get used to someone looking at their pearly whites up close.

Do this ahead of time. To make that first appointment go off without a hitch, see if you can fill out any paperwork before the appointment so you can focus solely on your tot during the visit.

What happens at the first dental appointment?

Your tyke’s first visit to the dentist is primarily a meet-and-greet to get everyone acquainted. You can expect the appointment to last around 30 minutes, and you’ll spend most of your time answering questions about the following:

  • Family dentist history
  • Pacifier use
  • Bottle and breastfeeding schedules and habits
  • Oral hygiene
  • Sleeping habits

Your child’s dentist will also give a quick, no-stress first exam. Typically, your first-timer can sit on your lap while you lounge in the dental chair. This can work wonders for keeping littles calm, especially if they are nervous about a near-stranger peering into their mouth. During the exam, the dentist will:

Count teeth

Check for cavities and other dental issues

Assess development by looking at jaw, bite, gums, tongue, and the roof of your kiddo’s mouth

Clean teeth with a soft toothbrush if plaque is found to demonstrate brushing technique

Discuss a home dental-hygiene routine

Your child’s dentist might also offer a fluoride varnish treatment, which can help prevent, slow down, or stop tooth decay. (Fluoride is a mineral that works to strengthen tooth enamel.) The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that primary care physicians apply a fluoride varnish to all infants and toddlers starting when their first tooth appears (and through the age of 5), but if your child’s doctor hasn’t mentioned it, ask your pediatric dentist about it.

How often do toddlers need to go to the dentist?

Just like you, children should see a dentist once every six months. For toddlers, especially those who fear the dentist, it may be beneficial to inquire about visiting the dentist once every three months to establish trust and confidence.

Got more teeth questions? Here's help!

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  • A Child's First Dental Visit Fact Sheet

When should your child first see a dentist? You can take your child at a younger age, but experts recommend taking your child within 6 months of the first tooth coming in (erupting), or by about 12 months at the latest.

At this time, the dentist can give you information on:

Baby bottle tooth decay

Infant feeding practices

Mouth cleaning

Pacifier habits

Finger-sucking habits

Prepare your child

If possible, schedule morning appointments so young children are alert and fresh.

Prepare a preschooler or older child for the visit by giving them a general idea of what to expect. You can tell them about the exam room, the instruments they might see, the face masks the dentist and hygienist may wear, and the bright exam light. Explain why it is important to go to the dentist. Build excitement and understanding.

Prepare yourself

Discuss your questions and concerns with the dentist. Remember that your feeling toward dental visits can be quite different from your child's. Be honest with your view of the dentist. If you have dental anxieties, be careful not to relate those fears or dislikes to your child. Parents need to give moral support by staying calm while in the dental exam room. Children can pick up parents' anxieties and become anxious themselves.

Prepare the dentist

If you don't know the dentist, interview the person first to see if they sound right for your child's needs and personality. At the first visit, give the dentist your child's complete health history. For a restoration visit, such as getting a cavity filled, tell the dentist if your child tends to be stubborn, defiant, anxious, or fearful in other situations. Ask the dentist how they handle such behavior. If you aren't comfortable with the answer, find another dentist.

Watch how your child reacts. Many parents are able to guess how their child will respond and should tell the dentist. Certain behaviors may be linked to your child's age:

10 to 24 months. Some securely attached children may get upset when taken from their parents for an exam.

2 to 3 years. A securely attached child may be able to cope with a brief separation from parents. In a 2-year-old, "no" may be a common response.

3 years. Three-year-olds may not be OK being apart from a parent when having a dental procedure, such as getting a cavity filled. This is because most 3-year-olds are not socially mature enough to separate from parents.

4 years. Most children should be able to sit in another room from parents for exams and treatment procedures.

The first visit

Your child's first dental visit is to help your child feel comfortable with the dentist. The first dental visit is recommended by 12 months of age, or within 6 months of the first tooth coming in. The first visit often lasts 30 to 45 minutes. Depending on your child's age, the visit may include a full exam of the teeth, jaws, bite, gums, and oral tissues to check growth and development. If needed, your child may also have a gentle cleaning. This includes polishing teeth and removing any plaque, tartar, and stains. The dentist may show you and your child correct home cleaning, such as flossing, and advise you on the need for fluoride. Baby teeth fall out, so X-rays aren’t often done. But your child's dentist may recommend X-rays to diagnose decay, depending on your child's age. X-rays are also used to see if the root of a jammed baby tooth may be affecting an adult tooth. In general, it is best that young children not have dental X-rays unless absolutely needed.

The second visit

Just like adults, children should see the dentist every 6 months. Some dentists may schedule visits more often, such as every 3 months. This can build comfort and confidence in the child. More frequent visits can also help keep an eye on a developmental problem. Talk to your dentist about payment options if the cost of dental care is a problem for you.

Protect your children's teeth at home

 Here are some tips to protect your children's teeth:

Before teeth come in, clean gums with a clean, damp cloth.

Start brushing with a small, soft-bristled toothbrush and a very small amount of fluoride toothpaste (the size of a grain of rice) when your child's first tooth appears. Use a pea-sized dab of fluoridated toothpaste after 3 years of age. Children should spit after brushing. Encourage them not to swallow extra toothpaste.

Prevent baby bottle tooth decay. Only put breastmilk or formula in bottles. Don't give children a bottle of juice, soft drinks, or sweetened liquid.

Limit the time your child has a bottle. Children should finish bottles before going to sleep.

Encourage your child to use a cup around their first birthday.

Help your child brush their teeth until age 7 or 8. Have the child watch you brush and follow the same brushing pattern to reduce missed spots.

Limit foods and treats that increase tooth decay. This includes hard or sticky candies, fruit leather, and sweetened drinks and juice. Offer fruit rather than juice. The fiber in fruit tends to scrape the teeth clean. Juice just exposes the teeth to sugar.

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When Should My Child First See the Dentist?

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Search the functional dentist locator, how to prepare for your child’s first dentist appointment, how long will the appointment last.

One of the most common questions I get from parents is “When should I bring my child in for his/her first dentist visit?”

Some parents want to wait a few years until their child has all his or her teeth; some want to bring in their infants just a few months after they are born; and others wait until their child is fully insured, which, depending on enrollment timing, can delay the first visit.

My Recommendation for Making a Child’s First Dentist Appointment

I typically tell my patients to bring their child in for his visit around the age of six months (which is usually when the first baby tooth appears in the mouth), or at least before his first birthday—whichever comes first. Tooth decay can happen to anyone, even infants, so it’s important to begin caring for your child’s teeth as soon as they start to come in.

It’s also essential to instill good dental hygiene habits in your child as early as possible because children who have had positive experiences with their dentists are more likely to love brushing and better care for their adult teeth. They are less likely to skip dental appointments and they are more likely to prevent the development of cavities .

First acclimating your child to the dentist office between the ages of six months and one year is a great way to start raising a health-savvy child , as is setting a positive example yourself. I encourage both parents to attend dental appointments with their child, if possible, so that he can see that proper oral health care is a family affair.

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Before your take your child to his or her very first dental appointment, there are a few things I recommend to help you both prepare:

  • Help your child get excited about his visit. He may be too young to speak or understand languages, but he can pick up on tone and body language. If you appear happy and excited about visiting the dentist, he will be as well.
  • Prepare for the possible reactions from your child by bringing a few comforting toys to help your child feel more at ease.
  • Speak with your dentist ahead of time and have him or her explain what will happen during the first visit. Every dentist has a slightly different approach, and you’ll feel more prepared and relaxed after you know exactly what will occur.

What Happens During a Child’s First Dentist Appointment?

While all dentists have their own ways of handling infant patients, the first dentist visit is usually about the same no matter where you go. Since so few teeth have come in, the dentist can’t do much cleaning, but he or she will want to look at your child’s mouth to be sure everything looks healthy.

You will be able to stay with your child throughout the entire visit, and your role during this first appointment is key. You are your child’s familiar face, so it is important that you remain calm and collected. Your infant might scream or refuse to sit still, but that’s okay. In fact, most dentists expect that. Just work with your dentist to secure your child and make the appointment as positive as possible.

An infant dental appointment will usually include the following:

  • Your dentist will examine your child’s teeth, gums, jaw, oral tissues, and bite to ensure everything is properly forming and coming into place.
  • He or she will then carefully polish your child’s tooth or teeth, getting rid of any plaque along the gums.
  • The dentist will take x-rays if any deep cavities are present and visible to the naked eye.
  • Finally, he or she will advise you on home cleaning tips and techniques.

Most infant dental appointments are brief—typically 15-30 minutes long—for good reason. Because dentists can be intimidating to infants and young children, short visits leave little time for children to get scared. This ensures that the child will develop trust with the dentist and also begin to understand that each appointment has both a beginning and, thankfully, an ending.

Children, like adults, should see a dentist every six months, but some parents like to bring them in every three months to help their children further establish rapport with his dentist. If a child is too fussy or inconsolable on the first visit, it’s okay. You can reschedule and try again in another two to three months.

The important thing to remember, though, is to not give up. Your child’s oral health begins with you behavior and attitude about your own dental visits. In the beginning, it’s you—not the dentist—who will be the best role model.

Dr. Mark Burhenne DDS

Got more questions about your child’s first dentist appointment?  Ask me a question !

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About Mark Burhenne, DDS

I’m on a mission to empower people everywhere with the same evidence-based, easy-to-understand dental health advice that my patients get. You can read my story here. I have been a dentist in private practice for 35 years. I graduated from the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, CA in 1987 and am a member of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM), Academy of General Dentistry (Chicago, IL), American Academy for Oral Systemic Health (AAOSH), and Dental Board of California.

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Home » Topics » When should my toddler have their first dental visit?

When should my toddler have their first dental visit?

Article at a Glance

  • Dental care should begin as early as a child’s first birthday or within six months after their first tooth appears.
  • There are several benefits to seeing a pediatric dentist rather than a general dentist.
  • Early dental visits help treat problems early on and help prevent dental issues in the future.

As a new parent, you want to ensure your baby is healthy and happy. One crucial aspect of your baby’s health is their dental health. But, since babies arrive with many needs and without a full set of teeth, dental care can be an easy step to overlook.

When should my baby’s first dental visit be?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Academy of Pediatrics both recommend that children see a dentist by their first birthday, or within six months after their first tooth appears. This may seem early, but it’s important to establish good dental habits from a young age. A pediatric dentist can also check for any potential dental problems and provide guidance on how to care for your baby’s teeth.

Does my baby need to see a children’s dentist or a general dentist?

The most important part is that you see a dentist. But, there are several benefits to seeing a pediatric dentist instead of a general dentist for your child’s dental care.

Specialists in Children’s Dentistry

Pediatric dentists receive two to three years of additional training after dental school that focuses on the unique dental needs of infants, children, and adolescents. They are specifically trained to work with children, including those with special needs, to provide a comfortable and positive dental experience.

Child-Friendly Environment

Pediatric dental offices are designed to be child-friendly, with bright colors, toys, and games in the waiting room to help children feel comfortable and relaxed. The dental chairs and equipment are also designed with children in mind, making the dental experience less intimidating.

Preventive Care

Pediatric dentists focus on preventive care, such as fluoride treatments and dental sealants, to help children avoid tooth decay and other oral health problems. They also advise on good oral hygiene practices and diet choices to help children develop healthy habits for life.

Early Detection and Treatment of Dental Problems

Pediatric dentists are trained to detect and treat dental problems early, before they become more serious and require more extensive treatment. They can also provide early intervention for orthodontic issues, helping to ensure proper dental development and preventing more significant problems later on.

Education and Support for Parents

Pediatric dentists work closely with parents to educate them about their child’s oral health and provide guidance on proper dental care at home. They can also support parents with concerns about their child’s dental development or their behavior during dental appointments.

Why Dental Checks are Important

Regular dental check-ups are essential for everyone, regardless of age. For babies, seeing a dentist early can help prevent future dental problems. Those little baby teeth play an important role in developing adult teeth. They help your baby chew and speak and also hold the space for adult teeth to grow in properly. If baby teeth are lost too early due to decay or injury, it can cause problems with the development of adult teeth.

Seeing a dentist early can also help establish good dental habits. A pediatric dentist can provide guidance on how to clean your baby’s teeth and gums and provide information on proper nutrition and fluoride usage. By establishing good habits early on, you can help ensure your baby’s dental health as they grow older.

What can we expect during my baby’s first dental visit?

During your baby’s first dental visit, the dentist will likely do a quick exam to check for any potential issues. They may also guide you on brushing and flossing techniques appropriate for your child’s stage of dental development. Finally, the dentist will likely clean your baby’s teeth and offer fluoride treatment.

If you’re visiting an office specializing in kids, chances are good that your child will leave with a smile, a prize, and a positive memory of the visit.

In conclusion, your baby probably needs to see a dentist earlier than you might have thought. If you prefer to see a generalist, it’s not the end of the world. But if you or your child have complex dental issues or anxiety around dental visits, starting with a children’s specialist may be the smart move.

Be sure to check out these dental articles as well: Taking Care of our Children’s Teeth What should I do if my child has a dental injury?

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Preparing Children for Their First Dental Visit: A Guide for Parents

Simone bagattoni.

1 Unit of Special Needs Dentistry and Paediatric Dentistry, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, 40125 Bologna, Italy

2 Unit of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Surgical, Medical and Molecular Pathology and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy

Francesca Nascimben

Elena biondi, raquel fitzgibbon, lisa lardani, maria rosaria gatto, gabriela piana, katia mattarozzi.

3 Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy

Associated Data

The data presented in this study and the information booklet are available on request from the corresponding author.

The aim of the study was to test an information booklet containing suggestions to parents on how to prepare their child for the first dental visit. Forty-five children and one parent per included child took part in the trial. Children were randomized in two groups; the information booklet was e-mailed to the parents of the study group. At the end of the visit, the dentist and the parent evaluated the child’s behavior through the Frankl Behavior Rating Scale (FBRS) and the utility of the booklet through a Likert scale. The children evaluated the pleasantness of the visit and the perceived pain through the Wong–Baker FACES ® Pain Rating Scale (WBFPRS). Parents evaluated the information booklet as highly understandable and useful. According to the dentist, informed children were more cooperative (FBRS median score: 4; IQR: 3.5–4) than the control group (median score 3; IQR: 2–4) ( p = 0.013; Mann–Whitney U test). Children prepared with the booklet reported less pain (WBFPRS: 0.40 ± 0.82 vs. 1.42 ± 1.99; p = 0.034; t -test;) and tended to evaluate the visit as more enjoyable (WBFPRS: 1.1 ± 2.14 vs. 2.75 ± 3.43; p = 0.064; t -test) than unprepared children. The information booklet increases the child’s ability to cooperate during the visit and could represent a useful instrument for the clinical practice.

1. Introduction

In medicine and dentistry, the treatment’s effectiveness derives not only from the competence of the physician but also from the ability to create an effective relationship with the patient. When the patient is a child or a special-needs patient, the relationship is more complex [ 1 , 2 ]. The dentist has a dual task: to deal with the child’s possible resistance arising from fear of the unknown and potentially threat; to deal with parents’ behavior, often unprepared to adequately guide their child toward dental care [ 3 ]. Obtaining the child’s and parents’ cooperation, while promoting a positive attitude toward dental care, is a primary goal for the pediatric dentist [ 4 ].

In this context, preoperative communication is very useful, but often underestimated. Many studies have shown how the information children receive about the dental environment before the visit can influence their behavior, both positively and negatively. A previous study showed that presenting pictures of children enjoying the dental visit promotes a positive relationship with the dentist [ 5 ]. The study showed a reduction in anticipatory anxiety, the unpleasant sensation that afflicts children during their first dental experience [ 5 ]. The study by Melamed et al. [ 6 ] showed that children that were previously prepared for restorative procedures watching a video of a peer undergoing the same procedure can overcome their fears and be more cooperative. The children of the control group, who were shown a video with nondental content, reported a higher level of anxiety.

Even though the child acquires information of the therapy’s steps and instruments, they have never experienced them directly; thus, they can be frightened of what they will feel. It is, therefore, necessary to provide preparatory sensory information; this helps the child to cope with fear and pain, especially when combined with the use of distraction. Distraction alone may not be enough if the child, unaware of what will come, is tense and unable to distract themself; the prepared child knows what awaits them and is more easily distracted [ 7 , 8 ]. As shown in several studies, the parent’s state of anxiety greatly influences that of the child; hence, the preparatory information is also useful for reassuring the parent [ 9 ].

To date, not enough attention has been paid to the role of communication before the first dental visit to encourage the child’s cooperation and avoid dysfunctional behaviors. The dentist can provide parents with the information they need to adequately prepare the child for treatment. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of an information booklet to promote pediatric patients’ cooperation during the first dental visit. We hypothesized that offering guidance to parents on how to prepare their children for the first visit would (I) reduce the degree of unpleasantness of the visit for children, (II) reduce the child’s pain perception, (III) increase the child’s cooperation, and (IV) be appreciated by parents.

2. Materials and Methods

This was a single-center parallel-group study. We adopted a single-center approach to guarantee consistency regarding equipment, environment, and data collection. The study took place at the Unit of Pediatric Dentistry of the Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences of the University of Bologna.

The study design was approved by the Ethics Committee of Area Vasta Emilia Centro (CEAVEC) on 23 January 2019 (protocol No. 0033664, ref 69/2019/SPER/AUSLBO) and registered on ClinicalTrial.gov ( {"type":"clinical-trial","attrs":{"text":"NCT05608720","term_id":"NCT05608720"}} NCT05608720 ).

2.1. Sample Size

Preliminary results from a pilot study carried out by the same scientific committee (not published data) evidenced an average of visit pleasantness rated by children equal to 0.9 in the study group and 2.7 in the control group. Consequently, at an alpha level equal to 0.05 with a power of 80% for a two-sided test and an allocation ratio of 1:1 between the two groups, a sample size of at least 21 children was needed in each group.

2.2. Recruitment and Randomization

Eligible participants were parents and their children who made an appointment for a first visit at the Unit of Pediatric Dentistry of the Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences of the University of Bologna between January 2019 and September 2019. The parents of 158 children were initially contacted by telephone by the principal investigator, a pediatric dentist, to check the exclusion/inclusion criteria and to obtain a preliminary verbal informed consent for study participation. A total of 102 children were excluded because they met one or more of the exclusion criteria (i.e., previous dental visits, intellectual disability, and mother tongue other than Italian). Parents were then emailed information regarding the objective of the study to obtain formal informed consent to participation. Of the 56 eligible children, eight did not show up on the day of the visit, and the parents of three children did not consent to participation in the study. Forty-five children and one parent each were included in the study. After obtaining informal consent by e-mail, participant randomization was performed. Each participant was assigned an alphanumeric identification code. The parent and respective child were identified with the same number and a different letter code (example: child C_01, mother M_01, and father F_01). The participants were randomly assigned to the study or control group.

2.3. Procedure

Two days before the dental visit, the parents within the study group received the information booklet as a PDF file by e-mail. The parents and children in the control group received the usual information (i.e., day, time, place of the appointment, and bureaucratic information) along with a thank you for participating in the study.

The day of the dental visit, written informed consent was collected, and the children of both groups were visited by a pediatric dentist on duty at the time, blinded to patient group allocation. The first dental visit consisted of a visual examination of the oral cavity with the aid of a dental mirror and a dental probe to assess the oral health status of the child. A tell–show–do approach was utilized. No operative procedures (e.g., fillings or X-rays) were performed. At the end of the dental visit, the principal investigator handed the pediatric dentist, the parent, and the child a paper questionnaire.

The child’s questionnaire investigated the pleasantness of the visit and the perceived pain using the Wong–Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale (WBFPRS) with corresponding scores from 0 to 10 [ 10 ] ( Figure 1 ).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is healthcare-10-02321-g001.jpg

Wong–Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale.

The dentist’s questionnaire investigated the child’s behavior during the visit using the Frankl Behavior Rating Scale (FBRS) [ 11 ] (1 = definitively negative, 2 = negative, 3 = positive, and 4 = definitively positive).

The parent’s questionnaire investigated the behavior of the child during the dental visit through the FBRS; if part of the study group, it also investigated the evaluation of clarity, comprehensibility, usefulness, ease of application, and truthfulness of the booklet through the Likert scale to five points (1 = very little, 5 = very much).

2.4. Information Booklet Description

The information booklet was ad hoc written on the basis of the effectiveness of communication in the doctor–patient relationship [ 12 ]. The choice of concepts and words was based on the literature on stress and the nocebo effect [ 13 ]. The objectives were to increase knowledge about the first dental visit and to prevent the child from activating negative expectations and aggressive or avoidance responses. The booklet was written in Italian, and it consisted of four pages with texts and pictures showing a parent and a child talking about the visit. Specifically, the first part of the booklet explained to parents the importance of the first dental visit in promoting a positive attitude toward the dental environment. The second part suggested how the parent should prepare the child for the visit: “inform the child about the visit to the gentle dentist using truthful and positive words”; “accept the child’s fears and concerns without denying them”, using phrases such as “you must not be afraid”; “prepare the child for some simple procedures, such as ‘sit down, it is time to count your teeth’”; “welcome the concern and fear expressed by the child”; “propose a cartoon about Peppa Pig’s first dental experience ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLN0smEFoPI , Peppa Pig episode 2 × 37 ‘At the Dentist’, accessed on 15 December 2018)”; “do not use words with negative emotional valence”; “do not promise that unpleasant events will not occur”; “do not promise gifts”; “do not talk about negative dental experiences” ( Figure 2 ). Easy-to-understand language and colorful images consistent with written information were used to make communication more effective. The booklet is freely available upon request to the corresponding author.

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Object name is healthcare-10-02321-g002.jpg

Example of easy-to-understand language and colorful images adopted.

2.5. Statistical Analysis

Statistical analysis was conducted with SPSS software (27.0 version, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). A Kolmogorov–Smirnov test verified the Gaussian distribution of the variables. Consequently, the mean and standard deviation were calculated for WBFPRS scores; the median and interquartile range (IQR) were calculated for FBRS scores. The t -test and Mann–Whitney U test were used for the comparison of continuous variables and the chi-square test was used for categorical variables. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. The biostatistics were masked to the group allocation.

3.1. Sample

Twenty-one children were included in the study group, along with 24 in the control group. Descriptive characteristics of children, parents, and operators are described in Table 1 . No significant differences were found between the two groups.

Descriptive characteristics of the study and the control group.

3.2. Information Booklet

The average scores provided by the parents concerning clarity, comprehensibility, usefulness, ease of application, and truthfulness of the booklet are shown in detail in Table 2 .

Evaluation of booklet’s contents.

The difference in pain reported by the children during the visit between the study group (0.40 ± 0.82) and control group (1.42 ± 1.99) was statistically significant ( p = 0.034; t -test). As shown in Figure 3 , children in the study group reported less pain than the control group.

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Reported pain by children in the two groups.

The difference in pleasantness reported by the children during the visit between the study group (1.1 ± 2.14) and the control group (2.75 ± 3.43) was not statistically significant ( p = 0.064; t -test). As shown in Figure 4 , children in the study group tended to evaluate the visit as more pleasant than the control group (lower scores indicate higher approval).

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Object name is healthcare-10-02321-g004.jpg

Reported pleasantness of the visit by children in the two groups.

The difference in children’s behavior assessed by the operators between the study group (median: 4; IQR: 3.5–4) and the control group (median: 3; IQR: 2–4) was statistically significant ( p = 0.013; Mann–Whitney U test). As shown in Figure 5 , operators judged the children in the study group as more cooperative compared to the control group.

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Dentists ‘evaluation of children’s behavior.

The difference in children’s behavior assessed by parents between the study group (median: 4; IQR: 3–4) and the control group (median: 4; IQR: 2.25–4) was not statistically significant ( p = 0.347; Mann–Whitney U test).

4. Discussion

Negative, painful, and invasive experiences play a central role in the etiology of dental fear, and they often date back to childhood and adolescence. Children who had a negative experience since the first approach to the dentist have a higher risk of suffering from dental fear than children who had only a negative or painful experience after several positive experiences [ 14 , 15 ]. Hence, this shows the importance of setting up a structured first dental visit that activates positive experiences and nontraumatic memories.

This is the first study in the literature to focus on the child’s preparation before the first dental visit. This preparation took place in a safe environment and by an affectively relevant person such as a parent informed by the booklet. Parents appreciated the information booklet considering it clear, easy to use, and truthful. Our results show that guiding parents to prepare their child for the first dental visit has a reassuring effect on both sides. Parents felt involved in the process from the beginning and felt ready to explain the situation to their child. Children showed a more cooperative behavior, and they tended to find the visit more enjoyable than the children in the control group. Notably, they felt less pain during the procedure. For clarity, the first dental visit in both groups did not include operative or invasive procedures. The reported pain is probably an expression of the stress experienced during the visit. However, the lower reported “pain” of the study group could be explained by less anticipatory anxiety and an increased sense of control toward an unknown experience [ 16 ]. Many studies agreed in identifying negative experiences and anxiety as powerful modulators of pain perception, including in dentistry [ 17 , 18 ]. However, the relationship between anxiety and preparation may have a twofold trend; too much or too little information can increase anxiety levels [ 19 ]. Therefore, it is important to pay attention to the quality and quantity of information; the booklet provides the parent with specific indications on what to say and what not to say to the child [ 20 ].

An important result emerged from the pediatric dentists’ evaluation: children in the study group were more cooperative than the unprepared children. This outcome represents a great advantage for the pediatric clinician and potentially even more so to the general practitioner. In contrast, parents did not see their children’s behavior as more cooperative. This could be explained by the fact that both groups were approached by experienced pediatric dentists, well trained in dental behavior management [ 21 ]. An increase in the number of participants could lead to a more consistent result, in accordance with the dentist’s assessment.

A limitation of the study concerned using single-item measures. However, we based our methodology on validated psychometric scales used to rate pain, emotional stimuli, and behavior during the visit. Randomization gave control over confounding variables that could not be held constant or measured, such as the reason for the first visit, the parents’ gender, age, and educational level, the parents’ personality traits and previous dental experiences, the child’s personality traits, or any other unknown confounding factors that could differentiate the group composition. Bias, potentially derived from the pediatric dentist who visited the child, was controlled by masking the procedure. Considering the aim of the study, masking of participants could not be applied. Data analysis potential bias was controlled by masking the biostatistics.

In accordance with the literature, our results confirm the importance of preparing parents and children for their first dental visit through booklets, simulation programs, or smartphone applications [ 22 , 23 ].

A further research project could evaluate the efficacy of the booklet in the long term (i.e., during dental treatment) and for children with previous negative dental experiences. In addition, it would be interesting to test the information booklet on general dental practitioners and to extend an adapted version to other care settings involving children. Lastly, a further evaluation of the difference between a written booklet and audiovisual material such as a video of a first visit could be tested.

5. Conclusions

Guiding parents to prepare children at home increases the ability to cope with the dental visit and decreases the perception of discomfort and pain. The information booklet is easy to implement in the clinical practice, both in private and in public facilities, and the cost is negligible.

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge the participants who made this study possible.

Funding Statement

This research received no external funding.

Author Contributions

Conceptualization, G.P. and K.M.; methodology, K.M. and S.B.; investigation, F.N., E.B., and L.L.; data curation, S.B., M.R.G. and K.M.; writing—original draft preparation, S.B., F.N., R.F., and K.M. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.

Institutional Review Board Statement

The study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the Ethics Committee of Area Vasta Emilia Centro (CEAVEC) on 23 January 2019 (protocol No. 0033664, ref 69/2019/SPER/AUSLBO).

Informed Consent Statement

Informed consent was obtained from all subjects involved in the study.

Data Availability Statement

Conflicts of interest.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

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Healthcare in Moscow – Personal and Family Medicine

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About medical services in Moscow

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Emergency medical care is provided free to all foreign nationals in case of life-threatening conditions that require immediate medical treatment. You will be given first aid and emergency surgery when necessary in all public health care facilities. Any further treatment will be free only to people with a Compulsory Medical Insurance, or you will need to pay for medical services. Public health care is provided in federal and local care facilities. These include 1. Urban polyclinics with specialists in different areas that offer general medical care. 2. Ambulatory and hospitals that provide a full range of services, including emergency care. 3. Emergency stations opened 24 hours a day, can be visited in a case of a non-life-threatening injury. It is often hard to find English-speaking staff in state facilities, except the largest city hospitals, so you will need a Russian-speaking interpreter to accompany your visit to a free doctor or hospital. If medical assistance is required, the insurance company should be contacted before visiting a medical facility for treatment, except emergency cases. Make sure that you have enough money to pay any necessary fees that may be charged.

Insurance in Russia

EMIAS ATM

Travelers need to arrange private travel insurance before the journey. You would need the insurance when applying for the Russian visa. If you arrange the insurance outside Russia, it is important to make sure the insurer is licensed in Russia. Only licensed companies may be accepted under Russian law. Holders of a temporary residence permit or permanent residence permit (valid for three and five years respectively) should apply for «Compulsory Medical Policy». It covers state healthcare only. An employer usually deals with this. The issued health card is shown whenever medical attention is required. Compulsory Medical Policyholders can get basic health care, such as emergencies, consultations with doctors, necessary scans and tests free. For more complex healthcare every person (both Russian and foreign nationals) must pay extra, or take out additional medical insurance. Clearly, you will have to be prepared to wait in a queue to see a specialist in a public health care facility (Compulsory Medical Policyholders can set an appointment using EMIAS site or ATM). In case you are a UK citizen, free, limited medical treatment in state hospitals will be provided as a part of a reciprocal agreement between Russia and UK.

Some of the major Russian insurance companies are:

Ingosstrakh , Allianz , Reso , Sogaz , AlfaStrakhovanie . We recommend to avoid  Rosgosstrakh company due to high volume of denials.

Moscow pharmacies

A.v.e pharmacy in Moscow

A.v.e pharmacy in Moscow

Pharmacies can be found in many places around the city, many of them work 24 hours a day. Pharmaceutical kiosks operate in almost every big supermarket. However, only few have English-speaking staff, so it is advised that you know the generic (chemical) name of the medicines you think you are going to need. Many medications can be purchased here over the counter that would only be available by prescription in your home country.

Dental care in Moscow

Dentamix clinic in Moscow

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Dental care is usually paid separately by both Russian and expatriate patients, and fees are often quite high. Dentists are well trained and educated. In most places, dental care is available 24 hours a day.

Moscow clinics

«OAO Medicina» clinic

«OAO Medicina» clinic

It is standard practice for expats to visit private clinics and hospitals for check-ups, routine health care, and dental care, and only use public services in case of an emergency. Insurance companies can usually provide details of clinics and hospitals in the area speak English (or the language required) and would be the best to use. Investigate whether there are any emergency services or numbers, or any requirements to register with them. Providing copies of medical records is also advised.

Moscow hosts some Western medical clinics that can look after all of your family’s health needs. While most Russian state hospitals are not up to Western standards, Russian doctors are very good.

Some of the main Moscow private medical clinics are:

American Medical Center, European Medical Center , Intermed Center American Clinic ,  Medsi , Atlas Medical Center , OAO Medicina .

Several Russian hospitals in Moscow have special arrangements with GlavUPDK (foreign diplomatic corps administration in Moscow) and accept foreigners for checkups and treatments at more moderate prices that the Western medical clinics.

Medical emergency in Moscow

Moscow ambulance vehicle

Moscow ambulance vehicle

In a case of a medical emergency, dial 112 and ask for the ambulance service (skoraya pomoshch). Staff on these lines most certainly will speak English, still it is always better to ask a Russian speaker to explain the problem and the exact location.

Ambulances come with a doctor and, depending on the case, immediate first aid treatment may be provided. If necessary, the patient is taken to the nearest emergency room or hospital, or to a private hospital if the holder’s insurance policy requires it.

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April Fools' Day pranks: Apps to translate baby stoner sayings, a ghostbuster at Tinder

Every april 1, brands and companies want to get some laughs – and attention – with goofy new 'product' launches. here are some ideas from companies such as sweetgreen, welch's and omaha steaks..

If you don't like Mondays, this one may especially be grating. It's April Fool's Day , when you should trust no one and question everything.

The roots of April Fools' Day may date back before to before the 15th century. But the modern-day April Fools' Day has become a day to prank a friend, family member, co-worker − or your customers.

Even though some companies have had April Fools' pranks backfire , marketers continue to issue spoof products in attempts to get some laughs and attention.

Already ahead of April Fools' Day, 7-Eleven has hinted at a possible prank product: In addition to new Lemon Lime, Green Apple and Sweet Orange flavored 7-Select sparkling waters, out now with partner Miracle Seltzer, there's a fourth flavor coming April 1: Big Bite Hot Dog.

The hot dog-flavored water "combines the mouthwatering experience of 7-Eleven’s iconic Big Bite Hot Dog into one refreshing beverage – ketchup and mustard included," the convenience chain says in a press release . "Say goodbye to the days of alternating bites of a hot dog with sips of a beverage, now those on the go can swap the bun for bubbles."

Krispy Kreme: A special doughnut deal for April Fools' Day

Will Big Bite Hot Dog sparkling water be sold? Its availability will be announced April 1. However, some reporters were sent a can of the drink. USA TODAY can confirm that it definitely smells like hot dog water and has a smoky aftertaste.

If you are interested in trying it, both 7-Eleven and Miracle Seltzer have hinted at having some to give away on their Instagram pages. (If you get a can, share with a friend as it's 16 ounces.)

Here's a roundup of many of the brand-related April Fools’ gag announcements. You've been warned.

Sour cream & onion flavored soda

Despite the proliferation of crazy-flavored products including Peeps-flavored Pepsi , Frank's RedHot sauce-flavored Vlasic pickles and Doritos Nacho Cheese-flavored liquor , healthy soda brand OLIPOP and Pringles are not really teaming up to bring to market a Sour Cream & Onion soda.

The product would have been "a match made in heaven … to bring the delicious, tangy flavor of Pringles’ Sour Cream & Onion flavor to life in liquid form with prebiotic benefits," the companies said.

Stoner lingo translation app

Another dream team prank product: Rosetta Stoned, a mobile app from Rosetta Stone and medical marijuana company Fluent , that "bridges the conversational gap between novice users and seasoned stoners in any social setting."

Da da decoder

Infant equipment site BabyQuip has its own language-bridging lark: the “Baby Translator” app, to decode your baby's secret language.

"Say 'goodbye' to restless nights as you decode your baby's coos and cries instantly, providing you with the understanding you need as a parent, all in one convenient app," it promises.

An AI-powered plush doll

Custom stuffed animal maker Budsies already makes selfie plush dolls with a built-in voice recorder. Its April Fools' spoof: Artificial intelligence-enabled dolls that "come programmed to learn everything about you and to become your new best friend."

A 50-pound Bearabuddy

Sorry to the 3,500 or so who have already signed up to buy Bearaby's Jumbo Benji plush toy, which is four times the size of its regular weighted plush toys and twice as heavy as its heaviest weighted blanket . This isn't actually going to be sold. But it is real and will be making its home in the lobby at The Child Mind Institute in Harlem to welcome children and their families. More weighted plushies are due the day after April Fools' Day, the company says.

A sleeping bag to go bananas over

The Dole Banana Peel Sleeping Bag, conveniently promoted as being available on April Fools' Day only, is made from actual banana fiber and "allows parents to escape into their own cocoon of sensory deprivation."

A full-body cleaning suit

Outrageous clothing company Tipsy Elves has a special product for April Fools' Day: The Mopsie. You don't need paper towels anymore, you can use your body to clean up those messes, with this "innovative, wearable microfiber towel jumpsuit" for "effortlessly soaking up spills and messes with ease." There's also a Baby Mopsie for "hard to reach places."

Korean BBQ deodorant

Kevin's Natural Foods , which has paleo- and keto-certified ready-to-cook and easy-prep entrées, is touting a new line of personal care products inspired by its food dishes including Korean BBQ Deodorant, Cilantro Lime Toothpaste, Lemongrass Basil Shampoo and Tikka Masala Sunscreen.

"These new face, body and hair care essentials will help fans prioritize self-care inside and out," the company says. 

Omaha Steaks' meaty sprays

Omaha Steaks has its own personal care prank product: Meaty Spritz sprays with flavors such as Omaha Fog, Hog Haze, and Cock-a-Doodle-Dew.

"The world’s first protein-infused, flavor-packed, portable pump spray … (to) enjoy all the mouthwatering flavors of your Omaha Steaks gourmet favorites no matter how far away from the kitchen you are!" the company says.

Sriracha toothpaste

Asian sauce maker Lee Kum Kee , which makes Sriracha Chili Sauce and Sriracha Mayo Dressing, is introducing – not – its Siracha Mayo Toothpaste. It's "fiery and creamy goodness … is sure to spice up your morning dental routine."

Post-salad dental kit

Need some less powerful toothpaste? Sweetgreen offered these fanciful personal hygiene products as part of its Sweetgreen After Salad Kit, which is "designed with your pearly whites in mind … offering everything you need to freshen up post-meal."

Choose from Miso Ginger Toothpaste, Spicy Cashew Mints, Lime Cilantro Dental Floss, and Sweetgreen Toothbrush and Floss Picks.

Fruit juice lip gloss

More personal care prank products: Welch’s Juicyfuls Juicy Fruit Lip Gloss – now available in five flavors: grape, orange, peach, strawberry and raspberry – made with real juice from Juicefuls fruit snacks so "you get that irresistible sweet flavor you love, all in a lip gloss that's as fun as it is nourishing."

Protein-powered seasonings

Quest Nutrition , maker of protein powder, snacks and other products, has a prank product line of seasonings including All Purpose, Lemon Pepper, and Garlic Herb, each of which deliver "21g of protein, 2g of net carbs and less than 1g of sugar."

If you want to try Quest's real products, you can use code NOJOKE for free shipping on online orders over $49 April 1-3.

Superpowered Superfeet?

These would certainly come in hand on a run, but – sorry – it's a jogging joke. Superfeet SuperBoost Power E-Soles gives you 8 hours of continuous battery-powered boost, for almost Iron Man-like propulsion. "All the comfort and support of Superfeet , now with electrifying performance," the company says in a video about the prank product. "It's like having a powerful electric motor in your shoes."

Scotch tape-branded Scotch?

This shenanigan seems like a blend that could stick: Scotch Whisky by Scotch Brand. The whisky "features a nose of cherry wood and a delightfully smooth finish that hits like a well-wrapped gift."

Who you gonna call when ghosted? This new title at Tinder

Dating app Tinder announced a new April Fools' Day hiring quest for a Vice President of Ghost Hunting to help combat "one of dating culture’s most prevalent vices – ghosting," a practice inflicted on 78% of singles already in 2024 (an untrue fact from Tinder).

Patrón's bringing back a beloved liqueur. No kidding.

Patrón patrons get some good news today. The premium tequila maker chose April Fools' Day to announce the return of its Patrón XO Cafe tequila-based coffee liqueur, which was discontinued in 2021. Since production ceased, devotees took to social media and signed a petition asking parent company Bacardi to bring it back.

Made with Patrón Silver tequila and Arabica bean coffee – the dry liqueur can be sipped straight, in cocktails and as dessert topping – Patrón XO Cafe will begin arriving in stores again later this month.

Say it with dead flowers

Don't forget to put roses on your April Fools' Day list. UrbanStems has this "special" delivery, The Dead Inside Collection, "an assortment of dead flower bouquets, dead plants, half empty vases, and more for the pessimist in your life." But, for real, check UrbanStems' social media accounts including Instagram for how to get 20% off an order of real flowers.

Cheesecake Factory's real deals

The Cheesecake Factory  also has a deal that's no joke: Sign up for the chain's Cheesecake Rewards loyalty program on April 1 to get an Any Slice, Half Price reward, redeemable for 50% off any slice of cheesecake or layer cake, with any food or beverage purchase (no gift cards).

Those who were members before April 1 will find something special in their account on Monday, too: either a free slice of cheesecake each month for a year, a free whole cheesecake, a free slice of cheesecake, $5 off $25 purchases, or $10 off $40 purchases. (All rewards redeemable by April 16; can be redeemed for dine-in, to-go and DoorDash.)

New merch from Dunkin', bonus points in app

Dunkin' announced it is going back to its roots and rebranding to just "Donuts'" on Monday, April 1. To celebrate the rebrand, the company is selling "Donuts'" merch, including sweatshirts that read "DONUTS," on ShopDunkin.com .

Additionally, Dunkin' Rewards members will receive 3x bonus points on any donut order through the mobile app on April 1.

Urban Outfitters launches 'Name Three Shirts' movement

Urban Outfitters said it is launching a global movement to "stand in solidarity against band-tee-shaming" by launching a new collection called "Name Three Shirts."

The t-shirt line "playfully mocks the gatekeeping attitudes of older generations who insist that band-shirt wearers should be required to name songs by those artists," the company said in a news release.

The line, which features revamped logos from bands such as The Grateful Dead, Joy Division and Led Zeppelin, is a "playful jab at the attitudes of older generations, and fights back against the misogynistic undertones of the infamous ‘name three songs’ line of questioning," Urban Outfitters said in the news release.

The collection of shirts is available online and in select Urban Outfitters stores starting April 1. You can shop the collection online here .

Auntie Anne's, Frontier Airlines collaborate on Pretzel Plane

Auntie Anne's pretzels and Frontier Airlines announced they have collaborated on the newest addition to Frontier's fleet: the Pretzel Plane.

According to a news release, the plane includes new in-flight entertainment featuring Auntie Anne's pretzels rolled seat-side, the "luxurious" smell of hot, fresh pretzels throughout the cabin and airplane-shaped pretzels if you're feeling hungry.

Moe's Southwest Grill, Sonic team up to introduce a Queso Slush

Two popular fast food chains announced a collaboration that is sure to be polarizing.

Moe's and Sonic announced a new beverage, the Queso Slush, a queso-flavored slushie. "The frozen goodness of a Sonic Slush meets the delicious flavor of Moe's queso."

Follow Mike Snider on X and Threads:  @mikesnider  & mikegsnider .

Gabe Hauari is a national trending news reporter at USA TODAY. You can follow him on X  @GabeHauari  or email him at [email protected].

What's everyone talking about? Sign up for our trending newsletter to get the latest news of the day

First Moscow State Medical University

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I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University is the oldest leading medical university in Russia that has become a cradle of most medical schools and scientific societies of our country. For decades it has been unofficially known as “First Med”.University success is based on a blend of glorious traditions and actual innovative approaches multiplied by a great potential of human resources. We are proud to be a unique educational, scientific and medical complex that graduates, certifies and provides lifelong professional education for physicians and other healthcare workers; that contributes significantly to the domestic and global medicine. The University is closely linked to the fundamental and applied research, highly efficient medical treatment, and propaganda of medical and pharmaceutical achievements. Our University is rich with knowledge and experience that is generously transferred to our students, to those whose mission will be to face the challenges of the 21st century in the field of medicine and people aiding, to implement new methods and technologies in healthcare.

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02 February 2021

Admission 2021-2022 is open

Dear prospective students. We are glad to inform you that First Moscow State Medical University start admission for 2021-2022. All foreign students can apply now

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May 27, 2020

Season’s Greetings from Sechenov University

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Sechenov University Maintained its Position in the 5-100 Project

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Russian Urologists to Create an “ideal” Protocol for Managing Early Stages of Prostate Cancer

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Extra

Celebrity News April 01, 2024

‘too hot to handle’ star francesca farago & tiktoker jesse sullivan expecting first child.

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“Too Hot to Handle” alum Francesca Farago and TikTok star Jesse Sullivan are having a baby together!

On Sunday, Francesca announced her pregnancy.

She wrote on Instagram, “We wanted to take this special day to celebrate this amazing milestone with all of you. We've brought you with us through the loss, so we couldn't wait to bring you along for the win. I am still pretty newly pregnant, and there's so much more to come, but we are so excited to be growing our family with Arlo as the coolest older sibling! AHH IM PREGNANT!"

Arlo, 15, is Jesse’s child from a previous relationship.

Jesse also posted a video of their IVF journey.

“We’re pregnant! Its been such a struggle to get here, but we felt like TDOV was the perfect day to let you all in on our celebration 👶🏻👶🏻,” Sullivan added. “Im so proud of @Francesca Farago for fighting her way to get here, and I fall more in love with her every day. Thank you for following our journey, and heres to more trans joy!✨”

The pregnancy news comes nearly a year after the pair got engaged.

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‘Too Hot to Handle’ Star Francesca Farago Engaged to TikToker Jesse Sullivan

Last year, they expressed their desire to have a family together. During an appearance on the “Sofia with an F” podcast, Jesse said , “We're going to probably make embryos, and we're going to use Arlo's, most likely, Arlo's biological other dad for the sperm. So, we would make my embryo from mine, my embryo from hers, his sperm and then we would freeze them until she's actually ready to carry."

Francesca elaborated, “It would be his egg, my egg, same sperm. That's the plan."

Earlier this year, Farago opened up on their future plans at the 2024 People’s Choice Awards. She said, “We want a huge wedding, but I think it would be so cute if we had a little baby in our arms or two babies in our arms at the wedding. So, hopefully we can have a baby first and then do the big wedding after."

Francesca and Jesse met over Zoom at an online event in 2021 and then made it official the following year!

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Punxsutawney Phil welcomes two babies

Groundhog Club handler A.J. Dereume holds Punxsutawney Phil in Punxsutawney, Pa., on Feb. 2, 2023.

Punxsutawney Phil now has a new job that will last year-round. The world-renowned groundhog whose primary gig is weather prognostication is now a father for the first time in 138 years.

Phil and Phyllis recently welcomed two baby groundhogs on Saturday, according to the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club.

The babies are currently with the pair in their burrow at the Punxsutawney Memorial Library, where they are being cared for and can be seen through a viewing window.

A video of the new arrivals shows the healthy woodchuck babies wriggling with each other.

For a groundhog full of surprises, this one has been like no other for Phil’s handlers and the world.

“It was just evident when they went in one day and there were two groundhogs, we went in the next day, and they were four with two little babies,” Groundhog Club Vice President Dan McGinley said. “This was not something that we saw very far out, so it’s all brand new to all of us. We’re all very excited.”

Some may recognize McGinley as the one who announces Phil’s proclamation, reading the scroll that determines the fate of winter. He also handles many of Phil’s other appearances throughout the year.

The babies have not been named yet, but McGinley says he’s hopeful they’ll have names later this spring.

“If Phil decides to share with the president of the club the names, then we will be aware, but nothing yet,” he said.

Unfortunately though, the babies will not be “heirs to the throne,” as McGinley calls it. That is, they won’t ever take over Phil’s job on Groundhog Day when the time comes.

“There is only one and only has ever been one Punxsutawney Phil,” McGinley said. “These are not here to replace the one and only prognosticator of all prognosticators.”

Groundhogs live up to six years in the wild, but the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club has previously stated Phil’s longevity comes from taking a sip of the “elixir of life” every summer at the Groundhog Picnic. This secret recipe magically gives him seven more years of life.

Punxsutawney Phil has been making weather predictions since his first one in 1886.

Emily Hung is a desk assistant at NBC News.

IMAGES

  1. BABY'S FIRST DENTIST VISIT!

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  2. Be Prepared for Your Child's First Visit to the Dentist

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  3. Baby's First Dentist Visit

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  4. Baby's First Dentist Visit by First Birthday

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  5. Your Child’s First Dental Visit: 5 Things You Can Do to Make it a

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  6. Baby Steps: Your Child’s First Dentist Visit

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VIDEO

  1. Anya

  2. Baby’s first visit to the dentist! 🦷 🪥 #baby #teeth #dentist

  3. Skylers First Dentist Visit 2.18.10

  4. Toddler's first dentist appointment

  5. 미국 어린이 치과

  6. Ishan's Dentist Visit

COMMENTS

  1. First Dental Visit: When Should Baby Visit the Dentist?

    When to schedule baby's first dental visit. It might sound early, but aim to schedule your baby's first dentist appointment at a pediatric dentist (or one who's good with children) within 6 months of the time he sprouts a tooth or turns a year old, whichever comes first, according to the latest guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Pediatric ...

  2. My Child's First Dental Visit: What To Expect

    Babies should see a dentist by age 1 or within six months after the first appearance of their first tooth, whichever comes first. Early and regular dental care is important to your baby's oral ...

  3. A Child's First Dental Visit Fact Sheet

    The first dental visit is recommended by 12 months of age, or within 6 months of the first tooth coming in. The first visit often lasts 30 to 45 minutes. Depending on your child's age, the visit may include a full exam of the teeth, jaws, bite, gums, and oral tissues to check growth and development. If needed, your child may also have a gentle ...

  4. Preparing Your Child for Their First Dentist Visit

    The Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child should visit the dentist when the first tooth appears or no later than their first birthday. While it may sound early, starting at that age will start your baby on a path for great oral health and prevent a number of dental problems that can occur during childhood.

  5. Making Baby's First Dental Visit a Happy Milestone

    At your child's first dental visit, you can expect to be there for no more than 45 minutes. Their dentist will conduct a regular exam which includes checking your baby's teeth for tooth decay, pacifier teeth, gum condition, and bite. If they think it necessary, they may do a gentle cleaning and polish too. Unless there's an issue, you ...

  6. First Dental Visit for Baby

    The dentist will examine your child to make sure their jaw and teeth are developing in the way they should. During the visit, you will be seated in the dental chair with your child on your lap if your child isn't able to — or doesn't want to — sit in the chair alone. The dentist will check for mouth injuries, cavities or other issues.

  7. A Child's First Dental Visit Fact Sheet

    The first dental visit is recommended by 12 months of age, or within 6 months of the first tooth coming in. The first visit often lasts 30 to 45 minutes. Depending on your child's age, the visit may include a full exam of the teeth, jaws, bite, gums, and oral tissues to check growth and development. If needed, your child may also have a gentle ...

  8. Your Child's First Dental Visit: What To Expect

    Step 3: Make the Dental Appointment Fun. Keeping a positive attitude and talking excitedly about the dental visit will go a long way in making your child feel comfortable instead of scared. However, if you sense your child is nervous, bring along a stuffed animal friend. The "friend" — or an older sibling — can go first, and the dental ...

  9. Your Baby's First Dental Visit

    Baby teeth usually start to appear between 4-7 months of age. The lower teeth usually come in first. Once your baby's teeth appear, it is time to start brushing them with a smear of fluoride toothpaste on an infant sized toothbrush. A smear of toothpaste is the size of a grain of rice. At 4 years old, your child's jaw and facial bones will ...

  10. A Child's First Dental Visit Fact Sheet

    The first dental visit is recommended by 12 months of age, or within 6 months of the first tooth coming in. The first visit often lasts 30 to 45 minutes. Depending on your child's age, the visit may include a full exam of the teeth, jaws, bite, gums, and oral tissues to check growth and development.

  11. Tips For Baby's First Dental Visit

    For these answers and more, Kurian shares her insights and tips for ensuring baby's first visit to the dentist is a successful one. Handling nerves ahead of a dental visit. Whether you're worried about your child's nerves ahead of that first visit, or are letting your own dentist-related anxieties creep through (no judgment here!), you ...

  12. Taking Your Child To The Dentist For The First Time

    A quick search of the internet revealed that kids can start going to the dentist as soon as their teeth begin popping through—which, according to the American Dental Association (ADA), is usually around 6 months old. ( Whoops.) This, the organization says, is because tooth decay affects one in five children under 5—so by starting screenings ...

  13. Baby's First Dental Visit

    Your tyke's first visit to the dentist is primarily a meet-and-greet to get everyone acquainted. You can expect the appointment to last around 30 minutes, and you'll spend most of your time answering questions about the following: Your child's dentist will also give a quick, no-stress first exam.

  14. When Should My Baby Go To The Dentist For The First Time?

    Don't put off that first dental visit. "When should my baby go to the dentist," is a common question among new parents. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentists (AAPD) recommends toddlers see the dentist for the first time by age 1, or no more than six months after the eruption of the first tooth, and then twice a year thereafter ...

  15. A Child's First Dental Visit Fact Sheet

    The dentist can provide or recommend preventative information regarding baby bottle tooth decay, infant feeding practices, mouth cleaning, teething, pacifier habits, and finger-sucking. habits. ... Your child's first dental visit is to help your child feel comfortable with the dentist. The first dental visit is recommended by 12 months of age ...

  16. Baby's Dental Debut: When to Schedule the First Visit

    It might seem a bit early, but a child's first dental visit should take place soon after their first tooth appears — which usually happens between six months and one year of age. ‍. The reason your dentist might recommend a dental visit so soon is that it's possible for cavities to appear shortly after developing the first set of teeth.

  17. When Should My Child First See the Dentist?

    My Recommendation for Making a Child's First Dentist Appointment. I typically tell my patients to bring their child in for his visit around the age of six months (which is usually when the first baby tooth appears in the mouth), or at least before his first birthday—whichever comes first. Tooth decay can happen to anyone, even infants, so ...

  18. When should my toddler have their first dental visit?

    During your baby's first dental visit, the dentist will likely do a quick exam to check for any potential issues. They may also guide you on brushing and flossing techniques appropriate for your child's stage of dental development. Finally, the dentist will likely clean your baby's teeth and offer fluoride treatment.

  19. Preparing Children for Their First Dental Visit: A Guide for Parents

    Abstract. The aim of the study was to test an information booklet containing suggestions to parents on how to prepare their child for the first dental visit. Forty-five children and one parent per included child took part in the trial. Children were randomized in two groups; the information booklet was e-mailed to the parents of the study group.

  20. Healthcare in Moscow

    These include 1. Urban polyclinics with specialists in different areas that offer general medical care. 2. Ambulatory and hospitals that provide a full range of services, including emergency care. 3. Emergency stations opened 24 hours a day, can be visited in a case of a non-life-threatening injury.

  21. Moscow Summit (1972)

    The Moscow Summit of 1972 was a summit meeting between President Richard M. Nixon of the United States and General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. It was held May 22-30, 1972. It featured the signing of the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, the first Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty (SALT I), and the U ...

  22. Blake Horstmann & Giannina Gibelli Welcome First Child

    On Tuesday, Giannina announced the birth of their son Heath, who was born last week. She wrote on Instagram, "His first breath took ours away 💙. meet Heath Orion Horstmann born on Good Friday ...

  23. Dentists in Moscow, Russia • Check Prices & Reviews

    21A, Sadovo-Kudrinskaya St, Moscow, 123242. 4.6 from 1 verified review. The Russian dental clinic ARDC Moscow was founded in 2001 by dentist Giovanni Favero as a branch of his clinic at Sacramento, CA. He created a team of highly professional dentists who will be happy to welcome you at our dental clinic.

  24. April Fools' Day pranks: Apps to translate baby stoner sayings, a

    Already ahead of April Fools' Day, 7-Eleven has hinted at a possible prank product: In addition to new Lemon Lime, Green Apple and Sweet Orange flavored 7-Select sparkling waters, out now with ...

  25. First Moscow State Medical University

    Welcome to FMSMU. I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University is the oldest leading medical university in Russia that has become a cradle of most medical schools and scientific societies of our country. For decades it has been unofficially known as "First Med".University success is based on a blend of glorious traditions and actual ...

  26. 'Too Hot to Handle' Star Francesca Farago & Jesse Sullivan ...

    Arlo, 15, is Jesse's child from a previous relationship. Jesse also posted a video of their IVF journey. "We're pregnant! Its been such a struggle to get here, but we felt like TDOV was the ...

  27. Punxsutawney Phil welcomes two babies

    March 28, 2024, 8:08 AM PDT. By Emily Hung. Punxsutawney Phil now has a new job that will last year round. The world-renowned groundhog whose primary gig is weather prognostication is now a first ...