The Irish Road Trip

Best Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin (With Map)

By Author Keith O'Hara

Posted on Last updated: December 29, 2023

Best Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin (With Map)

If you’re after a self-guided walking tour of Dublin that packs a punch, you’ve landed in the right spot.

I’ve lived in Ireland’s capital for 34 years and I’m very confident you’ll love the mini-itinerary that I’ve outlined below.

It includes a one and two day option and it takes in the main things to do in Dublin , unique sights that tourists tend to miss and some historical pubs, too.

Our free Dublin walking tour follows a clear, logical route to ensure that you make the most of your time here. Dive on in!

Table of Contents

Day 1 of our self-guided walking tour of Dublin

free dublin walking tours

Click to enlarge image

The Dublin walking tour map above will give you an overview of where our route will take you over each day.

As you can see, each day has a clear route and packs in a mix of key attractions and places you hopefully won’t have heard of.

If you want a guided tour, you’ll find organised Dublin walking tours with excellent reviews right here (affiliate link).

Money saving tip: If you’re planning on visit some of the main fee-paying attractions in the city, the Dublin Pass can save you €50+

1. Molly Malone Statue

Molly Malone

Photos via Shutterstock

Day 1 of our self-guided walking tour of Dublin kicks-off at the now-iconic Molly Malone Statue on Suffolk Street in the heart of the city.

The bronze statue shows Molly, a famous character from the Irish song ‘Molly Malone’, who sold ‘Cockles and Mussels’ on the streets of the capital.

The statue was erected in 1988 and it has moved a handful of times. You won’t spend long here, but it’s a nice starting point for your stroll!

2. Trinity College

Trinity College

Our second stop of the day is a handy 2-minute walk from the first! Trinity College is one of the most famous landmarks in Ireland .

It is a renowned educational institution and it was established in 1592. It’s also inside the grounds of Trinity that you’ll find the ancient Book of Kells .

Trinity is the oldest university in Ireland and you can take a ramble through its impressive grounds, admire its magnificent architecture and tour the wonderful Long Room Library .

It’s in the Long Room that you’ll find 200,000+ of the college’s oldest books. It’s worth booking the skip-the-line ticket here as it gets busy ( this ticket gets you access to Trinity and Dublin Castle).

Related reads: See our guides on where to stay in Dublin + the best hotels in Dublin in 2024

3. The Palace Bar

The Palace Bar

Photos via The Palace on FB

The next stop on our self-guided walking tour of Dublin is going to be a brief one (I’m not suggesting you go drinking at this stage of the day!).

While there are many old pubs in Dublin , few are as visually impressive as the Palace Bar, which you’ll find a 3-minute walk from Trinity.

This pub was built in 1823 and it stands today, many years later, as a Victorian shrine, of sorts. Admire its impressive interior, first, and then saunter inside for a nosey (you can return here later).

It’s located just inside the cobbled streets of Temple Bar , so you can have a nosey around this area, if you like.

Related reads: See our guides on the best pubs in Dublin , the best Guinness in Dublin and the best pubs with live music in Dublin

4. O’Connell Bridge

O'Connell St.

When you’re ready, take the 3-minute walk to O’Connell Bridge, which spans the murky waters of Dublin’s River Liffey.

O’Connell Bridge replaced Gandon’s Carlisle Bridge, which opened in 1794. The bridge that stands to this day opened back in 1880 and cost £70,000 to build.

It measures at 148 ft in length and 160 ft in width. Named after political leader Daniel ‘The Liberator’ O’Connell it boasts impressive features, like its impressive lanterns.

Related reads: See our guides on spending 1 day in Dublin , 2 days in Dublin and 3 days in Dublin

5. The General Post Office

GPO

Walk up the historic O’Connell Street (be careful – there are plenty of dodgy characters that hang around here) and head straight from the The General Post Office (GPO) – it’s around a 4-minute walk from the last stop.

The GPO was built during the early 19th century and it’s here that you’ll see some of the more impressive architecture in Dublin , courtesy of the buildings neoclassical design.

This building played a key part in Irish history during the Easter Rising of 1916 when it served as the rebel headquarters. You can take a tour here that’ll immerse you in the city’s past.

6. The Spire

The Spire

One of the more unique places you’ll visit on this walking tour of Dublin is the Spire – it’s less than 1-minute walk from the GPO… you can’t miss it.

Also known as ‘the Monument of Light’ (along with many other colourful nicknames…), the Spire stands 394 feet tall and it was erected in 2003.

I’ll be honest – the Spire is impressive when viewed from afar, but there’s no real point of seeing it up close.

7. The Ha’penny Bridge

Ha’penny Bridge

The next stop on our self-guided walking tour of Dublin is a 7-minute walk from the Spire and it’s arguably one of the most beautiful bridges in Europe!

The Ha’penny Bridge , officially known as the Liffey Bridge, is an iconic pedestrian bridge that spans the River Liffey that was built in 1816.

It’s name comes from the fact that you once had to pay a toll to cross the bridge. The cost was a Ha’penny and there were turnstiles at either end of the bridge.

The bridge is a little slice of ‘old-Dublin’ that still used heavily to this day. It’s believed that around 27,000 people cross it each day.

Related read: See our guide on how to get around Dublin

8. St. Michan’s Church

Michan’s Dublin

Photos with thanks to Jennifer Boyer

You won’t find our next stop, St. Michan’s Church , on many Dublin walking tours, however, it’s  well-worth  a visit.

It’s a 12-minute walk from the Ha’penny Bridge and it’s here that you’ll find a historic building that dates back to the 11th century.

Oh, you’ll also find crypts with mummies… yes, mummies. In fact, some of the mummies at St. Michan’s are thought to be over 400 years old.

If you’re looking for unique things to see in the capital, make sure to add this one to your self-guided walking tour of Dublin.

9. The Brazen Head

Brazen Head

We’re off Dublin’s oldest pub, next – The Brazen Head (a 4-minute walk from St. Michan’s).

The present building that you see today dates back to 1754, local legend claims that the site has housed a tavern since 1198.

And though no documents exist to prove that, we know that there’s been a licensed alehouse here since the mid 17th-century at least (which is old enough!).

If you’re feeling peckish, this is a handy lunch-spot. It’s well worth visiting either way as this place is steeped in history .

10. Christ Church Cathedral

tipping in dublin

One of the most popular stops on this self-guided walking tour of Dublin is the stunning Christ Church Cathedral , a 6-minute walk from The Brazen Head.

Christ Church Cathedral was founded in the early 11th century under the Viking king Sitruic Silkenbeard (amazingly, that is his real name!).

Originally built as a wooden structure in 1030 with the help of an Irish priest, it was rebuilt in stone in 1172.

The current Gothic-style cathedral, with its striking architecture and impressive interior, has been standing since the 12th century.

11. Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle

Few castles in Ireland receive visitor numbers like our next stop. Dublin Castle is a 4-minute walk away and it’s here you’ll find an impressive structure that dates back over 800 years.

Originally developed as a medieval fortress under the orders of King John of England, work on Dublin Castle was started by Meiler Fitzhenry in 1204 when the city was under Norman rule following the invasion of 1169.

Constructed on elevated ground once occupied by an earlier Viking settlement, it was completed in 1230 and took on the look of a classic Norman courtyard design.

One of the most prominent parts of the castle today, the imposing Record Tower is the only surviving tower of the original Medieval fortifications.

While its rectangular battlements on the roof are actually a 19th-century addition, they look pretty convincing! 

Related read: See our guide on the best castles in Dublin

12. St. Patrick’s Cathedral

St Patrick’s Cathedral

Another firm favourite on this self-guided walking tour of Dublin is located a 12-minute walk from the castle.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral is a historic religious landmark that was founded in 1191. It’s the largest church in Ireland and it boasts Gothic architecture.

When you arrive here, take some time to saunter around the part and admire the cathedral’s exterior, before heading inside to get an eyeful of its outstanding interior.

13. The Guinness Storehouse

Guinness Storehouse

Photos © Diageo via Ireland’s Content Pool

Few Dublin walking tours can resist rounding off a day of strolling at The Guinness Storehouse , which is a 17-minute walk from St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

Book your tickets in advance (self-guided or guided) and immerse yourself in the story of the most famous of the many Irish beers .

The building itself is part of the Guinness Brewery and it acts as a seven-story visitor centre that takes visitors through the history of Guinness along with how it’s made and more.

The tour finishes on the rooftop in the impressive Gravity Bar that overlooks Dublin City and beyond.

Day 2 of our self-guided walking tour of Dublin

walking tours of dublin

1. St. Stephen’s Green

Stephen's Green

We’re going to kick-start day two of our self-guided walking tour of Dublin at St. Stephen’s Green , which is often referred to as the ‘Lungs of Dublin’.

You’ll find the nine hectare/22-acre park at the top of busy Grafton Street when it’s home to commemorative sculptures, extensive trees and a large pond.

It has a pretty  wild  history that few are familiar with (read more here ) and it’s a nice, calm spot to kick-start the day!

2. Leinster House

The second stop of the day takes us 4 minutes down the road to Leinster House – the epicenter of Irish politics.

This is an impressive Georgian building that dates back to the 18th century. Now, while you can take a guided tour, if you like, you’re arguably best off admiring Leinster House from afar.

Unless you’re interested in politics, that is – in that case head on in for a journey back through Ireland’s political past.

3. National Gallery of Ireland

National Gallery Dublin

Photo left: Cathy Wheatley. Others: James Fennell (Tourism Ireland)

The National Gallery of Ireland is a 5-minute walk from Leinster House and it’s here you’ll find one of the most popular museums in Dublin .

It’s also one of the best free things to do in Dublin when it’s raining! For visiting art enthusiasts, the National Gallery of Ireland is an absolute must.

This cultural treasure trove houses a vast collection of paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts spanning various periods, from the Renaissance to the present.

Ireland’s artistic heritage can go overlooked by tourists and locals alike – this is an excellent opportunity to immerse yourself in it.

4. Merrion Square

Merrion Square

Located in Dublin’s charming Georgian quarter, Merrion Square is a delightful mix of greenery and history (and it’s only 5 minutes from our last stop).

The square boasts finely manicured gardens that feel a far-cry from the busy city streets that lay just minutes away.

If you head for a stroll through its grounds, you’ll stumble upon impressive sculptures (including one of Oscar Wilde).

5. Irish Whiskey Museum

Irish Whiskey Museum

Photos by Brian Morrison via Failte Ireland

If you’re taking this self-guided walking tour of Dublin and it’s raining, our next stop will provide some welcome respite from the elements!

You’ll find the Irish Whiskey Museum a handy 15-minute stroll from Merrion Square and it’s here that you’ll discover the story behind the coveted Irish Whiskey .

I’ve done this tour in recent years and it offers a good mix (terrible pub intended…) of sippin’ and storytellin’.

You’ll get an insight into the history of whiskey and how it’s made and there’s also a tasting at the end.

6. Mulligan’s

Mulligan’s

© Tourism Ireland

Many Dublin walking tours take you to the busy pubs in Temple Bar . However, if you want to dodge the tourist traps, take the 6-minute walk from the Whiskey Museum to Mulligan’s.

You’ll find it on Poolbeg Street where it’s loved by locals and tourists alike for its old-worlde charm.

The pub received its license in 1782 but it operated as a Shebeen (a place where drink was sold illegally) for many years before.

The biggest compliment that I can give Mulligan’s is that walking through its doors makes you feel like you’ve stepped back in time.

Expect a lovely, traditional interior, a fine pint of Guinness and a furnishings that have stood the test of time.

7. The Custom House

Custom House

The next stop on our self-guided walking tour of Dublin is the magnificent Custom House, a 4-minute walk from Mulligan’s.

This is an architectural marvel on Dublin’s waterfront and it was designed by James Gandon in the late 18th century.

The Custom House is famous for its neoclassical facade which is best admired from afar, first, before up close.

The building is now home to the Department of Housing.

8. The Famine Memorial

Famine Memorial

Dublin’s Famine Memorial is a poignant tribute to one of Ireland’s darkest chapters in history.

Located on Custom House Quay, a 4-minute walk from the Custom House, these haunting sculptures depict the devastating impact of the Great Famine in the 19th century.

The memorial serves as a solemn reminder of the suffering endured by the Irish people during that time and stands as a testament to the resilience and spirit of those who lived through the tragedy.

EPIC Museum

Photo left: Eileen Coffey. Others: Ros Kavanagh (via Fáilte Ireland)

The next stop on our self-guided walking tour of Dublin is a handy 2-minute walk from The Famine Memorial.

EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum explores the profound impact that Irish emigrants have had across the world.

The museum is housed inside a vaulted space and stories are told via interactive exhibitions and striking displays.

You’ll need to pay into this one but it’s well-worth it (especially if it’s raining!).

10. The Jeanie Johnston

The Jeanie Johnston

Photo left: Gareth McCormack. Others: Dylan Vaughan (via Failte Ireland)

Many Dublin walking tours omit the brilliant Jeanie Johnston Famine Ship which sits a 2-minute walk from the EPIC Museum.

The Jeanie Johnston is an impressive replica of the original ship that transported Irish emigrants to North America during the Great Famine.

The ship is a floating museum that offers an insight into the challenges faced by those Irish men and women that sought a better life across the pond.

You can take a guided tour here where you’ll be immersed in a story that shaped the very DNA of Ireland.

Dublin walking tours FAQs

We’ve had a lot of questions over the years asking about everything from ‘What’s a good route with free attractions?’ to ‘What unique stops should be included?’.

In the section below, we’ve popped in the most FAQs that we’ve received. If you have a question that we haven’t tackled, ask away in the comments section below.

What’s a good route for a self-guided walking tour of Dublin?

If you use our Dublin walking tour map above, you’ll find a clear, logical route that takes in the city’s top sights over the course of two days. You could easily chop and change this route if needed.

Can you walk around Dublin in a day?

You can see the main sights in Dublin city in one day. If you follow the route on our Dublin walking tour map, you’ll only be walking from attraction-to-attraction for a total of 1.5 to 2 hours.

Can you walk around Dublin easily?

Yes. Dublin City is very walkable. Once you have a clear itinerary and know where you’re visiting and when, you’ll have no problem exploring the city on a self-guided walking tour of Dublin.

self guided tour in dublin

Keith O’Hara has lived in Ireland for 35 years and has spent most of the last 10 creating what is now The Irish Road Trip guide. Over the years, the website has published thousands of meticulously researched Ireland travel guides, welcoming 30 million+ visitors along the way. In 2022, the Irish Road Trip team published the world’s largest collection of Irish Road Trip itineraries . Keith lives in Dublin with his dog Toby and finds writing in the 3rd person minus craic altogether.

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Celtic Wanderlust

15 Sights in One Day | A Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin

Dublin city centre is fairly compact and can be easily explored on foot. Knowing the Irish capital very well, I put together an itinerary for a self-guided walking tour of Dublin focusing on sights located in the city centre so you can see as much as possible in one day.

Time spent on this tour depends entirely on you. It can be completed in less than 2 hours if you plan on just getting a feel for the city. Or you can spend all day if you decide to explore further and visit some of the attractions along this walking route of Dublin .

So let’s jump right in!

15 Sights in One Day | A Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin

Disclaimer This post may contain affiliate links. If you click on a link, I earn a little money at no extra cost to you.

Best Online Resources to Book your Trip to Dublin

  • Getting There | I would recommend Aer Lingus and Air France , two reliable and affordable airlines. If you’re travelling from the UK or France, you can also sail to Dublin with Irish Ferries and Stena Line .
  • Where to Stay | You’ll find accommodation for every budget on Booking.com . Cheaper options can be found on Hostelworld .
  • Things to Do | You can buy tickets, skip-the-line passes and day trips with GetYourGuide and Viator . Context Travel offers private tours led by local experts.
  • Getting Around | Travel from and to Dublin airport with Aircoach or Dublin Express . Transport For Ireland free app will help you navigate the city transport network if you ever need a bus.
  • Planning | Lonely Planet Dublin city guide is one of my favourite travel guides when it comes to planning a trip to the Irish capital.
  • Travel Insurance | Don’t forget to buy travel insurance before visiting Dublin. Heymondo has a nifty app to help you get the assistance you need while on the go.

More Travel Resources

Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin – PART 1

A. O’Connell Street

Start your day on  O’Connell Street . This large thoroughfare featuring statues to various Irish political leaders was in large part rebuilt after the violence of the  1916 Easter Rising . O’Connell Street has been the backdrop to several political events over the years and remains today the starting point of public protests and demonstrations.

General Post Office on O'Connell Street, starting point of your self-guided tour of Dublin

On O’Connell Street is one of Dublin’s main landmarks: the  General Post Office . It is still a working post office today, rebuilt after its near-destruction during the 1916 events. Don’t hesitate to have a quick look inside, or why not check out its Easter Rising museum .

Also on O’Connell Street can be found the  Spire , a controversial 121-metre-high needle of stainless steel that is now one of Dublin’s most recognisable features.

B. Ha’Penny Bridge

Taking a selfie on the  Ha’Penny Bridge  is a real cliché that few can resist. It is also a real challenge. Made of cast iron, this elegant but narrow 19th century pedestrian bridge over the  River Liffey  is a Dubliners’ favourite to cross between the North and South side of the city. Also very popular with tourists, it can become congested at times.

Ha'Penny Bridge, Dublin

The bridge was built in 1816 to replace rickety ferries used by pedestrians to move between the North and South bank of the river. It owes its name to the toll that people had to pay to cross the river: half a penny.

You might also be interested in: – Ireland Travel Books | The Best Guidebooks to Plan your Irish Adventure – Beyond the Cityscape | The Best Seaside Towns Near Dublin – The 4 Best Distillery Tours in Dublin To Learn About Irish Whiskey – 5 Amazing Places to Visit Near Dublin Without a Car

C. Temple Bar

Once you have crossed the Ha’Penny Bridge, head straight beneath the archway and enter  Temple Bar . The most photographed part of Dublin, Temple Bar is famous for its colourful pubs and Irish music pouring down its cobbled streets.

Temple Bar, Dublin

Often decried by locals as a tourist trap charging exorbitant prices for a pint of beer, Temple Bar is also Dublin’s cultural quarter , home to funky vintage shops, interesting art galleries, reputable restaurants and – a favourite of mine – a food market every Saturday.

D. Dublin Castle

Just across from Temple Bar is Dublin Castle . This wonderful piece of Georgian architecture is a must-see castle to visit on your first trip to Dublin . Dating from the 18th century, it replaced an earlier Norman fortress ravaged by a fire in 1684.

You won’t be allowed to enter the building without a ticket, but you can take a stroll around the Upper Yard for free and admire the Chapel Royal from outside.

Strop by Dublin Castle during your self-guided tour of Dublin

At the back of the Castle can be found the Dubh Linn Gardens , a landscaped haven of peace in bustling Dublin. It is also here you’ll discover the Chester Beatty Library . No doubt one of the best art museums in Dublin, the world renowned Chester Beatty Library is also free to visit. Your chance to take a peek at rare and richly decorated Bibles and Qurans dating back centuries ago.

E. City Hall

Next to Dublin Castle is the  City Hall . Built in the 18th century, the building is a great piece of neo-classical architecture. City Hall holds temporary exhibitions and access is free.

Dublin City Hall

F. Christ Church Cathedral

Five minutes away is  Christ Church , Dublin’s oldest cathedral. Extensively restored in the 1870s, it is an interesting mix of 12th-13th century architecture and Victorian Gothic features. Entrance is not free. If you decide to spend some time here, the guided tour will give you the opportunity to ring the bells in the belfry. Cheaper, you can also book a self-guided tour with audio guide (different languages available).

Admire Christ Church Cathedral on your self-guided tour of Dublin

In the Synod Hall of the Cathedral across the bridge is  Dublinia , a museum dedicated to Viking and Medieval Dublin that commands the access to the medieval St Michael’s Tower. Entrance is with ticket only.

G. Saint Patrick’s Cathedral

Located 5-10 minutes down St Patrick’s Street,  Saint Patrick’s  is Dublin’s second cathedral. Jonathan Swift, best known as the author of Gulliver’s Travels, is buried under its floor. He was Dean of the Cathedral from 1713 to 1745. Tickets must be purchased to enter the edifice.

St Patrick Cathedral in Dublin

Adjacent to the Cathedral is the picturesque  St. Patrick’s Park  created in 1901 by Sir Edward Guinness. Around the corner from the Cathedral down St. Patrick’s Close can be found the  Marsh’s Library . One of Dublin’s oldest libraries , the Marsh’s Library is a perfectly preserved 18th century library.

H. George’s Street Arcade

This walking itinerary will now take you back to the heart of the city.

George's Street Arcade, Dublin

One of Europe’s oldest shopping centres,  George’s Street Arcade  is a Victorian indoor market home to an eclectic range of stores, stalls and cafés. Visit its vintage shops or browse drawings from local artists. Discover the unexpected in George’s Street Arcade.

I. Powerscourt Centre

In the heart of the Creative Quarter,  Powerscourt Centre  is a beautiful townhouse elegantly transformed into a shopping centre. Discover designer and craft shops, antique Irish brooches and rings including the famous  Claddagh ring , or just take some time to relax with a coffee.

Visit Powerscourt Centre in Dublin while on your self-guided tour of the city

Wander through the streets of the Creative Quarter for more independent stores with locally made products and some of the best Irish craft and souvenir shops in Dublin .

J. Grafton Street

You’ve reached  Grafton Street , Dublin’s main shopping district. This pedestrian-only street is home to many high-street brands, from Vans to Victoria’s Secret. On sunny days, Grafton Street is taken over by buskers and inventive entertainers. Talented or not, that’s up to you to decide!

Grafton Street in Dublin

At Grafton Street’s far end sits  Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre . Its impressive architecture of glass and steel should convince you to have a peek inside. Across from it can be found the  Gaiety Theatre . Every summer, the Gaiety welcomes a world-renowned show: River Dance.

Feeling hungry or tired? Time to get some energy back before exploring further. Cafés and restaurants abound in Grafton Street and nearby side streets. Eat a sandwich on the go, sit on a terrace for a coffee and light bite, or enjoy comforting pub food. There’s something for every taste in and around Grafton Street.

Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin – PART 2

Now that you have rested your feet for a little while, let’s get back to our walking tour of Dublin .

A. St. Stephen’s Green

St. Stephen’s Green  is Dublin’s largest Georgian garden square and one of the most popular public parks in the city. Donated by Sir Arthur Guinness to the people of Dublin in the 19th century, St. Stephen’s Green has been a respite from the bustling city ever since.

Don't miss Saint Stephen Green while on your self-guided tour of Dublin

Across from St. Stephen’s Green, you might spot a 300-year-old cemetery on Merrion Row. Established in 1693, it was the burial ground for French Huguenots in Dublin , who fled religious persecution in France.

B. Merrion Square

With elegant Georgian townhouses lined up all around it,  Merrion Square  is considered Dublin’s finest Georgian garden square. Among other notable residents, famous writers Oscar Wilde and W.B. Yeats lived in those desirable homes, as well as Irish political leader Daniel O’Connell.

Merrion Square, Dublin

Only open to the public since the 1960s, it is worth wandering around the garden’s well maintained alleys and manicured lawns until you bump into the great Oscar Wilde himself resting on a rock.

Behind a secured gate,  Leinster House  and the  Government Buildings  can be observed at a distance from Merrion Square. If you fancy a breath of culture along your walking tour, the  National Museum of Ireland  and the  National Gallery  both have their entrances around the corner.  If you are visiting the city on a budget, these free Dublin museums have to be on your do-list!

C. Trinity College

Enter  Trinity College  through Nassau Street. Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, Trinity College is Ireland’s oldest surviving university and its most prestigious. You can roam the grounds freely and observe the elegant architecture of its oldest buildings harmoniously arranged in squares.

Trinity College, a must-see during your self-guided tour of Dublin, Ireland

Tours are available from the main entrance on College Green, though not offered all year round. If you have some spare time, visit the  Old Library  (tickets only) that hosts an exhibition of the famous  Book of Kells , an illuminated manuscript believed to date back to the 9th century. The Long Room with its spectacular vaulted ceiling is a must-see masterpiece.

D. Molly Malone

Molly Malone, Dublin

End your self-guided walking tour in front of St Andrew’s Church in St. Andrew’s Street where the statue of  Molly Malone  is now located. Molly Malone is a fictional fishmonger rendered famous by a popular song of the same name. The song has become the unofficial anthem of Dublin and ending a tour of the city without paying your respect to Molly Malone could be perceived as rude.

Guided Tours for the History Enthusiast

Self-guided tours are great. You can go at your own pace and decide where and how you want to spend your time.

But if, like me, you like learning about the history and interesting anecdotes of the place you visit, why not book a guided tour with someone knowledgeable?

Check out the recommendations below!

Where to Stay in Dublin City Centre

To make the most of your day, I recommend staying in the city centre to allow for an early start. Here are some recommendations of top-rated hotels with the perfect location:

  • O’Connell Street: The Gresham
  • Ha’Penny Bridge: Zanzibar Lock
  • Temple Bar: The Hard Rock Hotel
  • Grafton Street: The Westbury Hotel
  • Merrion Square: The Alex

Click here for more options, or read the latest reviews on Tripadvisor . Dublin can be very pricey, especially in the summer months. Always book early to get the best deal.

I hope you will enjoy this self-walking tour of Dublin and you will get to see as many sights as possible in just one day. There is so much to see that you might want to come back and explore Dublin even more. Hopefully this Dublin city guide will give you more ideas of things to do during your next visit to this wonderful and lively city.

Disclaimer: This post may contain affiliate links. If you click on a link, I earn a little money at no extra cost to you.

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Self-Guided Dublin Tour

self guided tour in dublin

This post is a self-guided tour of Dublin that covers all the iconic sites on the city's south bank as well as some lesser-known haunts.

The tour should take approximately 1.5 hours or just a bit less than that. The walk is approximately 1.5 km (just over 1/2 a mile).

Don't forget that you can also book a pay-what-you-like live-guided tour of the city centre with us!

Dublin Walking Tours

  • Start: Viking Longboat Statue
  • End: St Stephen's Green

Click the map to enlarge it or to download it to a smartphone.

Dublin Walking Tour Map

GPS-Enabled Audio Tour

We also offer an audio tour of historic Dublin, researched, written, and recorded by one of our own tour guides.

Here’s a sample.

Book the Dublin audio tour .

1. Viking Longboat Statue

We’ll see a lot of monuments in the course of the walk, and this one wins the prize for the most useful.

It doubles as a bus stop. If you have it to yourself, pretending to row is a classic photo opportunity.

Viking Longboat Statue

It surprises many visitors, but Vikings are a major part of Dublin’s story.

Initially raiders, in 841, some of them decided to settle down in Ireland, and they established towns along the coast.

2. Fishamble Street

Today, Fishamble Street is lined with modern buildings today, but its history was discovered starting in 1974 when the Dublin City Council decided to move its offices to a four-acre site here.

Fishamble Street

When archaeologists spoke up to say they’d found one of the most intact sites of its age in Europe, residents rallied around the idea of preserving it.

Those artifacts are mainly on display at the National Museum of Ireland, and the sidewalk here has little nods to them.

On the left side of the street, you can find five bronze markers with the shapes of artifacts unearthed here.

3. Handel’s Messiah

Also on the left, as the street begins to bend to the right, is a short, narrow white wall with a decorative arch.

This is the former entrance to the New Music Hall, wherein in 1742 the premiere of Handel’s Messiah was performed.

Handel’s Messiah

Messiah is a fixture across the English-speaking world during the Christmas season, and no less so here – except the annual tradition here happens on April 13 th , the same date as the original performance.

And since this is no longer a music venue, it takes place outside.

4. Christ Church Cathedral

There’s a lot to see on the grounds of Christ Church Cathedral – the stunning exterior, a labyrinth in the courtyard if you need somewhere to clear your head, and the interior, available to explore with either a guided or self-guided tour. 

Inside, you’ll discover impressive stained glass windows and a mosaic floor, and sacred objects from the building’s history as both a Catholic and a Protestant church.

You'll also find a tower with a world-record-setting number of bells – 19 – and a crypt with the preserved remains of a saint as well as of a mummified cat and rat.

All that inside the oldest structure still in use in Dublin.

Christ Church Cathedral

The story of this church is long and interesting but you’ll need to learn more with the PDF and/or audio tour version.

If you’re interested in exploring inside, the church hosts services, tours, and music events.

Prayer services are held weekday mornings at 10 and evenings at 5, except on Wednesdays when they hold a choral evensong at 6. Sunday Eucharist is at 11 am.

Tours are available Thursday through Sunday, with first admission at 10 am and last admission at 4:15 pm.

Tickets are 7 Euros and fifty cents for adults with various concessions available.

The tour includes access to the bell tower and crypts, both of which involve stairs.

Tickets: https://www.mytoptickets.com/?3B041324-155D-D234-0AA684C0D2E68919

5. Dublin Castle

For more than seven centuries, Dublin Castle was the center of government in Ireland.

While there are still some older elements under the castle, most of what you can see dates from after a major fire.

It took place in the 17 th century, so the castle was rebuilt in the heyday of Dublin’s famous Georgian style of architecture.

Dublin Castle was built near the meeting of two rivers: the Liffey, where our tour started, and the Poddle, which still merges into the Liffey here, but today flows underground.

Dublin Castle

If you’d like to visit the castle, it’s open from 9:45 am to 5:45 pm daily, with final admission at 5:15 pm.

Self-guided and guided tours are available. Guided tours are an hour long and cover the State Apartments, the undercroft, and the royal chapel; tickets are 12 Euros with concessions for students, seniors, and children.

Self-guided tours offer access only to the State Apartments and exhibitions; these are 8 Euros, with the same concessions.

6. City Hall

City Hall is open to the public and free to enter.

Right through the door is a vast, impressive, echoing entrance hall with a massive dome, plus a glass elevator so you can see the whole thing from above.

All this opulence comes from the fact that when this was built in the 18 th century, it was the royal stock exchange and custom house.

But, when the city bought it in the 1850s for its current function, they added a floor mosaic with the city seal.

City Hall

There’s also a rotunda, which is available to visit when it isn’t rented out for events.

And the basement is home to a small gallery with a broad exhibition of artifacts from Dublin’s history.

There’s also a café inside if you’re due to rest a while. The building is open Monday through Saturday, from 10 am to 5:15 pm.

7. Temple Bar And The Irish Rock ‘N’ Roll Museum

Curved St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2

The area you’ve been walking through is called Temple Bar. For newcomers, the name can be confusing – it’s the name of a neighborhood, not a drinking establishment.

For the “Bar” part of the name, think sandbar rather than whiskey bar. It was named for the riverbed it borders.

Temple Bar And The Irish Rock ‘N’ Roll Museum

Today, the bars are of the whiskey rather than the sand variety, and the neighborhood has become a place where art meets nightlife.

The highlight of the neighborhood is its live music venues, and the Irish Rock N Roll Museum was built right in the middle of the action.

Within a few blocks, you’ll find art galleries, theaters, festivals, and lots of bars, more often than not with live music.

There are lots of other things to do in Temple Bar, and it’s well worth exploring this area at more leisure.

It’s also tourist central for Dublin, so scoping things out and making plans during the daytime can save you time after nightfall.

8. Bank Bar

The Bank is a bar and restaurant today, but it started out as a bank.

If you looked inside City Hall earlier, you’ll have gotten an impression of what Irish institutions of commerce looked like in the 18 th century.

This building takes that atmosphere into the late 19 th century.

The current interior was designed in the 1890s, and it was given the stained-glass ceilings, mosaic floors, and generally over-the-top décor that would inspire confidence in investors.

Bank Bar

All that grandeur is still there – if you’re here during open hours, you’re welcome to step inside and get a look at the place, whether or not you plan to patronize it.

And if you did decide to stay awhile, you could also see the bank vaults, which are in the basement near the restrooms.

Another treasure on offer is a full replica of the Book of Kells – the main tourist attraction of Trinity College, a couple of stops ahead.

The Bank Bar is open from 11 am to 10 pm daily.

9. Molly Malone Statue

This is Molly Malone. She’s the subject of a song called “Cockles and Mussels,” which is famous to the point of cliché among Irish people.

The title comes from the line “cockles and mussels alive, alive, oh,” which is a cry that street vendors selling mollusks actually used in the 19 th century when the song probably originated.

Molly Malone Statue

But its origins are mysterious, and its main character may or may not have been a real person.

Molly Malone is one of the most stereotypical Irish names you could think of.

The character, real or not, meets a tragic end.

After taking up the family business of selling seafood from a cart, she meets the song’s narrator and leaves a strong impression, but then dies of fever and haunts the streets, hawking shellfish for eternity.

And you actually can hear Molly’s voice today.

This is one of the Talking Statues of Dublin – twelve monuments that can talk to you through your phone with the help of a QR code on a plaque located nearby.

10. Irish Houses Of Parliament (Former Location)

We’ve already seen a couple of examples of transformed houses of commerce, a stock exchange turned into a city hall and a bank turned into a bar.

This is a house of parliament turned into a bank.

It was built in 1729 when Ireland was dominated by an English upper class but still had its own legislature.

Like the English Parliament, it was a bicameral or two-house parliament, with a House of Lords and a House of Commons.

They had no permanent home and met where they could, often in religious spaces or private homes, where it could be difficult to even fit all the members, much less do their work gracefully.

Irish Houses Of Parliament (Former Location)

This building was commissioned to solve that problem.

The architect was himself a member of parliament, and he designed the first building in the world meant to serve exactly the purpose of a two-house legislature.

In 1800, the Acts of Union, passed by both the English and Irish Parliaments, formally joined the two lands into the United Kingdom.

The Irish Parliament was dissolved. Three years later, the Bank of Ireland acquired the building.

11. Trinity College

What you’re seeing now is the oldest part of Trinity’s campus, mostly consisting of 19 th -century buildings.

Trinity is the single college that makes up the University of Dublin.  Similar universities in the UK contain many colleges.

And that was the model the founders had in mind in 1592 when a Church of Ireland archbishop asked the English crown to grant land that had once belonged to a monastery for the creation of a university.

Trinity College

The bell tower, called the Campanile, is the centerpiece of this area – it’s from 1853, so it’s been here long enough to develop some lore.

Trinity is one of the most respected universities in the world, and its alumni can be found in many corners of the present and of history, including the Irish separatist movement.

Several Irish presidents went here, and it’s particularly known for its literary graduates.

James Joyce unsurprisingly wasn’t one of them, but Oscar Wilde, Jonathan Swift, Samuel Beckett, Bram Stoker, and lots of others were.

And when it comes to literary significance, Trinity also has an undeniable claim to fame: the Book of Kells , located in a stunning library just a few steps away from the Campanile.

It’s the university’s main attraction for visitors, but not the only one: the campus is also home to a zoological museum (only open during the summer), a science museum, an art gallery, and a theater.

12. The Book Of Kells

If you don’t know the Book of Kells, it isn’t the kind of book you sit and read.

No one is allowed to touch it, it’s in Latin, and even if you know the language, it’s written so elaborately that it’s almost unreadable.

The Book Of Kells

But the decoration is the point: the Book of Kells is an illuminated manuscript.

It's a copy of the four gospels of the New Testament of the Bible written so artfully that it’s considered Ireland’s single foremost cultural artifact, and one of the greatest works of art of Europe’s Middle Ages.

The word “Kells” comes from the Abbey of Kells, which was where the book was kept for centuries and probably where at least part of it was made.

The building where it’s located is called the Old Library, built in 1712, and the part that houses the book is the Long Room, a 65-meter room that’s remarkably beautiful on its own.

It’s also home to a 15 th -century wooden harp – an instrument that was as essential at one time to Gaelic music as the fiddle is today.

This one is the basis for the harp design seen on the Irish emblem and on the logo of Guinness.

The Book Of Kells

Because abbeys were wealthy, they were targets for Viking raids, and that disruption probably destroyed many works of Insular Art and ended the era of their creation.

Given how fragile the book is, its survival is remarkable, and it’s had some close scrapes.

It was stolen once, probably less for the book itself than for a jeweled cover; the cover was torn off and the book was thrown away, but somehow it was recovered.  

13. Irish Whiskey Museum

Famous as Irish whiskey may be, it’s on its way out of a dark age.

After a heyday in the 18 th and 19 th centuries, when there were many hundreds of distilling companies on the island, by 1972 the number was down to one.

That company was Irish Distillers Limited, which produces well-known brands like Jameson, and in 1988, that single company became a subsidiary of a beverage giant based in France.

But 1988 also saw the opening of the first new distillery in Ireland in many decades. And today, there are 32.

Irish Whiskey Museum

This museum opened in 2014 and tells the story of that rise and fall and rise again, going all the way back to the drink’s origins.

The word “whiskey” comes from the Irish phrase “uisce beatha,” which means “water of life” – a straight translation of the Latin “aqua vitae,” which was the medieval name for any kind of solution involving alcohol.

The museum offers tours, a whiskey blending experience, and a brunch.

Of course, it has a bar, which has around 100 whiskeys and hosts live music and other events Friday through Sunday evenings, closing at 10:30 pm.

14. Grafton Street

Grafton Street is Dublin’s most famous corridor for shopping and people watching, and from here until St. Stephen’s Green, where the street ends, it’s pedestrian-only.

The street is mostly retail, and it has a little of everything from high-end to low-end, and some of the oldest businesses here are Dublin or Irish exclusives, mostly high-end shopping.

There’s Brown Thomas, a classy Irish department store, JM Barnardo Furriers, Weir and Sons Jewelers, and James Fox Cigars and Whiskey.

Joyce Plaque + Grafton Street

The smallest local businesses are the musicians – Grafton Street is busking central for Dublin.

One other local business to keep an eye out for is Bewley’s Oriental Café, founded in 1927.

Besides a place to stop for coffee or lunch, it’s also a historic hangout for writers – James Joyce not only spent time there but mentioned it in his book Dubliners.

15. National Gallery Of Ireland

Merrion Square West, Dublin 2

The National Gallery has been one of the best places to see art in Ireland since 1854.

It’s got both a national and a continental focus, with plenty of Irish artists, but also lots of other Europeans, from medieval to modern.

The Grand Gallery in particular mixes the two – it’s a long, elegant space showing works from across Enlightenment Europe, but all with some relation to Ireland, whether by artist or subject matter or the painting’s back story.

National Gallery Of Ireland

A local favorite piece is Irish painter Frederic William Burton’s The Meeting on the Turret Stairs .

Or, for some emphatically Irish subject matter, you could find Daniel Maclise’s The Marriage of Strongbow and Aoife , which depicts the cementing by marriage of the alliance between Diarmat Mac Murchada and his Norman allies.

But you can also see Vermeer and Caravaggio and Picasso, among other greats.

Admission is free for the main gallery, with admission sometimes charged for temporary shows.

Exhibitions and events: https://www.nationalgallery.ie/whats-on

16. Oscar Wilde Statue

Oscar Wilde stood out, and in a city full of statues in simple bronze or stone, so does this monument.

Artist Danny Osborne did his research, and given Wilde’s taste for overdressing and living beyond his means.

Osborne chose fitting materials: it’s made of four different stones from places as far apart as Canada and India, with bits of porcelain and bronze, plus the giant chunk of quartz he’s sprawled on, which is the only element sourced from Ireland.

Oscar Wilde Statue

He’s wearing a Trinity necktie and his wedding ring.

The female figure in his view is his wife Constance Lloyd, pregnant with one of their two sons; one of their grandchildren officiated at the unveiling of the monument.

And the male torso is meant to be Dionysus, the ancient Greek god of wine and drama.

Behind the flashy exterior, though, his private life was shaky.

He had a lasting relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas, a young man who introduced him to London’s underground gay scene.

Wilde eventually found himself on trial for sodomy and gross indecency. He was sentenced to prison with hard labor for two years.

With all this in mind, to see what the artist had in mind for this statue, you have to look at it from both sides.

His face is split like a tragicomic mask. Viewed from the right, he’s smiling, and you can see the society man and the quick wit; the other side shows him as he emerged from prison.

Besides reading Wilde’s many words engraved on the statues, you also have another opportunity to hear this statue talk, just like the Molly Malone one; there’s a link to information in the notes.

http://www.talkingstatuesdublin.ie/

17. Leinster House

Leinster House is the home of the Oireachtas, the Irish legislature, since 1922.

As before the Acts of Union, it’s a two-house legislature, but without the distinction between nobility and non-nobility drawn under the old system, and without English names.

Today, the two houses are the Seanad, the upper house, and the Dáil, the lower house, both of which meet here.

Leinster House

Unlike the old Parliament House, Leinster House wasn’t built for the purpose of legislative action.

It was a private residence, finished in 1748 for a man who would eventually become the Duke of Leinster.

But in 1922, when the Oireachtas has its debut at Leinster House, closely watched by hopeful locals and curious international press, it gave them a particularly Irish welcome: the proceedings of the legislature were held in the Irish language.

Fun Fact: Leinster House was partly the basis for the United States’ White House, designed by Irish architect James Hoban.

18. National Museum Of Ireland – Archaeology

This museum covers the history of Ireland from the Stone Age to the Late Middle Ages, along with a few exhibits on the ancient Mediterranean.

The area called the Treasury shows a history of Irish art, from the Iron Age through the development of the church-influenced Insular style (including illuminated manuscripts) to the Viking-influenced style that followed.

Another show focuses on prehistoric gold ornaments made during the Bronze Age.

And another focuses on the more practical items of prehistoric life in Ireland, including a 4500-year-old boat and the island’s oldest known musical instruments.

National Museum Of Ireland – Archaeology

The last of the permanent exhibitions focus on Viking life in Ireland, including relics from the elaborate burial traditions observed in the Norse religion, as well as Christian art created by those Vikings who settled and converted.

Other exhibits are shown on a temporary basis, and if you’re lucky – or unlucky, depending on how you feel about it – you may see bog bodies.

These are human remains naturally preserved in peat bogs, likely part of an ancient human sacrifice ritual.

Exhibitions: https://www.museum.ie/en-IE/Museums/Archaeology/Exhibitions

Events: https://www.museum.ie/en-IE/Museums/Archaeology/Events

The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 am to 5 pm, and Sunday and Monday, 1 - 5 pm. Admission is free, as it is at all four of the National Museum of Ireland locations.

19. The Mansion House

Through all of Dublin’s political upheaval and the game of musical chairs its governing institutions have played, this place has been unusually stable: since 1715, it’s been the official home of the Cathaoirleach, the mayor of Dublin.

It’s also been the scene of plenty of other major political moments.

In 1919, the first Dáil, or the lower house of the legislature, met here and spoke the declaration of Irish independence (there was also a centennial celebration of that event in January of 2019).

And in 1921, the Anglo-Irish Treaty, formalizing the terms of separation between the UK and the Republic of Ireland, was signed here.

The Mansion House

And before either of those events, this was where Michael Collins, a leader of the Irish separatist movement, evaded arrest by the British military by sweeping the floor and pretending to be a janitor.

Civic ceremonies are held here today, such as when the city bestows the title of Freeman of Dublin, a high honor that comes with grazing rights on the public greens and the duty to defend the city in case of attack.

All kinds of political and cultural figures have been honored in this way, so take a moment to imagine a future siege of Dublin when the city is defended by Michael Gorbachev, Bono and the Edge, and Barack and Michelle Obama.

20. The Little Museum Of Dublin

Next to the national museums we’ve seen, this is a humble place, but it’s also a local favorite.

It’s a scrappy, homemade, self-described “people’s museum,” focused on the part of Dublin history that’s still in living memory – think more U2 paraphernalia and soccer memorabilia than illuminated manuscripts and bog bodies.

It’s also a young museum. In 2011, a call was put out to the public for objects that screamed 20 th century Dublin, and the results were arranged in three floors of a Georgian townhouse.

For Dubliners, it’s a nostalgia experience on top of being educational.

They sell a variety of tickets – for 8 Euros you can get either a roughly hour-long self-guided experience or their staple, a half-hour guided tour.

The same price gets you access to their several themed tours:

  • a tour of Irish women’s history every Monday at 4 pm
  • a walk of St. Stephen’s Green every day at 3:30 pm
  • a tour themed around writers every day at 11:30 am
  • a tour within the museum of queer Dublin history every other Saturday at 4 pm.

15 Euros gets you an all-day pass for whatever’s on the day’s schedule.

There are guided options in Irish sign and French, and there’s a free tour of the museum Wednesdays at 11 am. 

The building is also home to a project called the City of a Thousand Welcomes, which can arrange, usually with some notice, for you to meet a Dubliner, one-on-one or two-on-one. 

21. St. Stephen’s Green

As indicated at the last stop, there’s enough to see in St. Stephen’s Green to make a whole walking tour on its own.

But it’s also a good place for leisure, which may be in order by now.

The park is open 7:30 am to dusk Monday through Saturday, 9:30 am to dusk on Sundays.

From here on the northside of St. Stephen’s Green, you’re just a short walk from the lake that spans most of the park’s width.

When you reach the water, you can make a right and walk a little further to find a bridge crossing a narrow point in the lake and leading to the center of the park, where you’ll find a Victorian flower garden.

St. Stephen’s Green

To the right from there is a garden designed for blind visitors, with plants chosen for their smell and physical texture, and to the left, in a bend in the lake, a bog garden.

The park was originally a commons used for grazing, but in the 17 th century, homes were built around it, and it became a private park for the residents.

In 1880 it became a public park, thanks to the philanthropic work of the Guinness family, the people behind Guinness beer.

One of them bought the park and paid for its renovation, and today he’s one of the many statues and monuments in the park.

During the Easter Rising, separatists seized the park, dug trenches, and fought against the British military, with a pause in the fighting so a groundskeeper could feed the ducks.

The park still shows the marks of that event: there’s a monument called the Fusilier’s Arch at the northwest entrance, which still has bullet holes in it.

And in the center of the park, opposite the bridge across the lake, is a bronze bust of Constance Markievicz, an Irish woman who fought in the Easter Rising, was the first woman elected to the British Parliament, and also served in the First Dáil and as a minister in the first government of the Republic of Ireland.

This is the end of the tour. We hope you enjoyed it. 

Free Walking Tours

Our free walking tour page lists the various pay-what-you-like walks that are available on a daily basis in English and Spanish.

These tours usually last 2.5 - 3 hours each. You can  book tours here .

Tourist Passes and Bus Tours

If you purchase a Dublin Pass or GoDublin Card , you'll get small-group guided walking tours included.

A hop-on-hop-off bus ticket will get you easy transportation around the city - directly to Dublin's most popular attractions. Audio guides and guided walks are also offered with each ticket.

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Dublin, Ireland Self-Guided Walking Tour JetSettingFools.com

Dublin Walking Tour: A Self-Guided Walk To Dublin, Ireland Sights

Welcome to JetSetting Fools, here you will find our best travel tips for destinations worldwide. Some of the links on this site are Affiliate Links and if you use them to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. For more information, read our Disclosure Policy .

Dublin, Ireland is home to numerous iconic sights and historic attractions – and the best way to see them is on a Dublin Walking Tour. We have devised a go-at-your-own-pace Free Self Guided Walking Tour of Dublin that features the best of the city. 

The top places to visit in Dublin are clustered together in the heart of the city center, which allows guests the opportunity to explore on foot. Travelers can use our easy-to-follow Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour to navigate to the top sights… for free ! We even include a helpful Dublin Walking Tour Map to help you make your way.

Free Walking Tour Dublin, Ireland

Our free walking tour of Dublin is a self-guided adventure to top attractions. The walk focuses on downtown Dublin and is an easy, flat stroll through the city center. Our Dublin sightseeing tour, without any stops, should take about 2 hours at a casual pace.

How To Use Our Free Walking Tour Dublin

For each sight on our Dublin free tour, we provide a brief introduction, as well as some background information. Additionally, we include directions from one sight to the next. You will find our helpful map of Dublin tourist attractions – plus a printable Dublin, Ireland tour map –  at the end of the article. 

The route includes 15 Must-See Dublin Attractions, many of which can be entered. Some sights are free, while other require a ticket (we indicate if there is an admission fee). If you plan on entering several sights, the Dublin Pass will likely save you money and so will our article covering 50 Free Things To Do in Dublin !

Why Use Our Dublin Walking Tour Free Route

If you only have one day, this free walking tour of Dublin, Ireland will surely get you acquainted with the city, as it includes stops at all the top things to see. Visitors can complete the walk of Dublin highlights in just 2 hours, but those who are entering attractions can plan a full day of sightseeing. 

Those with 2 days in Dublin – or more – can use our Free Tour Dublin Walk on the first day of their trip to get oriented. We also offer recommendations for more things to do in Dublin at the end of the article.

Free Tours Dublin: What You Need To Know

Our Free Tour of Dublin, Ireland is as advertised: absolutely free! Visitors simply follow our step-by-step tour as outlined below to the top sights. Our self-guided tour allows travelers to experience Dublin at their own pace and enter attractions as desired.

Walking Tour Dublin: Free & Guided

Visitors will see touts for many Free Tours in Dublin that are guide-led. However, it is essential to understand that a Guided Dublin Free Walking Tour is not, in fact, free. These Free Walking Tours Dublin are tip based – and guides expect (and hopefully deserve) tips. 

While we have outlined our Best Free Walking Tour of Dublin, visitors may opt to join one of the many guided tours. There are many themed guided walks in Dublin, including historical walking tours, street art tours and Dublin food tours.  We feature a few of the highly-rated Dublin walking tours – that are guided and require a fee – at the end of the article. 

Save, Pin or Bookmark our Free Dublin  Walk to use during your trip to Ireland!

Dublin Walking Tour: 15 Sights To See

Garden view of St Patricks Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland

Our self-guided, free tour of Dublin begins at Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. Use the provided links or the downtown Dublin Map at the end of the post to navigate from sight to sight. 

#1 St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin, Ireland

Dublin, Ireland self-guided walking tour: St. Patrick's Cathedral

The first sight on our city tour of Dublin is the iconic St. Patrick’s Cathedral. It was on this site that in 450 AD St. Patrick baptized the first Irish converts. St. Patrick’s Cathedral was completed in 1191 and is the largest church in Ireland. The spire reaches 140 feet.

The cathedral is one of the top attractions in Dublin and visiting requires an entry ticket. Buy your ticket now and download it to your phone!

Map Directions from St. Patrick’s Cathedral to St. Stephen’s Green.

#2 St. Stephen’s Green

Sunny day at St Stephens Green, Dublin, Ireland

The second attraction on our Dublin, Ireland sightseeing tour is St. Stephen’s Green. The 22-acre park in the center of Dublin was created in 1664 and has been open to the public since 1880. St. Stephen’s Green features a pond, a bandstand, memorials, statues, several paths and green lawns. If you wish, you can visit the official site for more information about the park.

If there is time in your Dublin itinerary, consider having a relaxing picnic in the park. Alternatively, explore the area directly north of St. Stephen’s Green. Top attractions in the vicinity are museums (The Little Museum of Dublin, The National Museum of Ireland Archeology, The National Gallery of Ireland), the Irish parliament building (called Leinster), the historic Mansion House (the residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin) and Merrion Square Park. 

Map Directions from Saint Stephen’s Green to Grafton Street.

#3 Grafton Street

View down Grafton Street, Dublin Ireland

The pedestrian-only shopping district, Grafton Street, is the next stop on our tour – and one of the must-see sights in Dublin. Grafton Street leads from St. Stephen’s Green to Trinity College and features long-standing stores, recognizable brands, and historic cafes.

Sights to look for are the Brown Thomas Department Store (opened in 1849), Weir & Sons jewelry store (opened in 1869) and Bewley’s Café (opened in 1927). 

Grafton Street is also popular with street performers and musicians that entertain the passers-by. In fact, even U2’s Bono has performed on Grafton. No Dublin visit is complete without strolling the iconic street. 

Map Directions from Grafton Street to Irish Whiskey Museum.

#4 Irish Whiskey Museum

Barrels at the Irish Whiskey Museum, Dublin

Whiskey is firmly part of Irish history. Today, distilleries dot the city landscape – each one offering their own story and tastings of their product. At the Irish Whiskey Museum, however, visitors get an unbiased version of the history of Irish whiskey…plus a chance to taste the product from several distillers. 

The Irish Whiskey Museum is conveniently located on Grafton Street – making it a popular stop on walking tours in Dublin, Ireland.

While tickets are required for the tour and tasting experiences at the Irish Whiskey Museum, visitors are free to stop in and check out the bar and shop. If you are skipping the guided tour, brush up on your Irish whiskey history . 

Map Directions from Irish Whiskey Museum to Trinity College.

#5 Dublin Trinity College

Trinity College, Walking Tour, Dublin, Ireland (1)

The famous Trinity College is the next stop on our Dublin walk (and it’s just across the street from the Whiskey Museum).

Established in 1592, Trinity College is Ireland’s oldest university and a must see in Dublin. The official name is College of the “Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin”, but is just called Trinity College for short.

Some of the college’s famous attendees are Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, Samuel Becket and Courtney Love. The 47-acre campus has buildings arranged in squares around a bell tower and the library houses the Book of Kells (buy your fast-track ticket ). 

Map Directions from Trinity College to the Irish House of Parliament.

#6 Irish House of Parliament

Exterior of the former Irish Parliament, Dublin

Directly opposite the main entrance to Trinity College is the former Irish House of Parliament, and today houses the Bank of Ireland. The building is both architecturally and historically significant, which is why it is an important stop on walks around Dublin. 

Built in the mid-1700s, the Irish House of Parliament was the first ever specifically designed parliament structure, in that it featured an interior with a dual chamber – one for the House of Lords and one for the House of Commons. It’s a design that is still used today in bicameral government buildings around the world.

In the year 1800, however, it was inside the building that the parliament voted (under bribery and threat of King George III) to abolish itself in order to unite Ireland and Britain under as the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. It was a relationship that only lasted 22 years. 

One odd thing to note about the building is the absence of windows. While there are places for windows, glass panes were never installed as there was a Window Tax that would have driven up the cost. 

Want to take a fun detour? Just around the corner from the House of Parliament is one of the most famous statues in Dublin – the Molly Malone Statue ( MAP ). Walk past the front of the Parliament House and turn left on Church Lane and walk about a block to find the famous Molly Malone. She is a character in an Irish song – a fishmonger by day and prostitute by night. The statue is often referred to as ‘The Tart with the Cart’ and visitors rub her bosoms for good luck. 

Map Directions from Parliament Building to O’Connell Street.

#7 O’Connell Street and The Spire

View up The Spire, Dublin, Ireland

Continue your Free Dublin Walking Tour by making your way north to the O’ Connell Street Bridge. Standing on the bridge, look up the stretch of O’Connell Street as it leads north from the River Liffey. The street has been the site of massive protests, the annual St. Patrick’s Day parades, shellings during the 1916 Easter Rising and a bombing of the Nelson Pillar in 1966. 

The street is named after the influential Daniel O’Connell (who is called The Liberator for his part in the Catholic Emancipation and his efforts to repeal the 1800 Act of Union). His statue stands at the north end of the bridge.

Further along the street are many other statues featuring some of Ireland’s most celebrated figures – as well as the Spire of Dublin. Officially called Monument of Light , the Spire was built on the site of Nelson’s Pillar and reaches a height of 390 feet. The needle-like monument stands as a symbol of Dublin.

Map Directions from O’Connell Bridge to Ha’Penny Bridge.

#8 River Liffey and the Ha’Penny Bridge

River Liffy View, Dublin Ireland Walking Tour

The next sight on our free Dublin Tour is the River Liffey. The river runs through the center of Dublin, dividing the city into north and south. The river has been an important part of the city’s trade since the time of the Vikings. 

Several bridges span the river, including three that are designated pedestrian-only, which makes for nice walks in Dublin. The most popular footbridge is the Liffey Bridge, which dates to 1816 and is better known as the Ha’ Penny Bridge for the 1/2 pence toll once required to cross it. 

Map Directions from River Liffey to Temple Bar District.

#9 The Dublin Temple Bar District

Famous Pub The Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

Every Dublin itinerary should include one or two stops at a traditional pub! The energetic Temple Bar District on the south side of the river is chock-full of Irish pubs, restaurants and tourist shops – and is one of the Dublin areas most visited by tourists.

Enter the district through the Merchant’s Arch, directly across from Ha’Penny Bridge and turn right onto Temple Bar. It’s fun to simply roam, but Temple Bar Street is not to be missed! 

The Temple Bar District is one of the best places in Dublin for a Pub Crawl ( like this one! ). Several of the bars have a line-up of live music starting mid-day and going late into the night. Our favorite pubs in the district are The Temple Bar and The Quays. 

Map Directions from Temple Bar to Dame Street and the Olympia Theater.

#10 Dame Street Dublin and The Olympia Theater

View of Dame Street, Dublin, Ireland

The next stop on our free tour of Dublin is Dame Street, a major thoroughfare through the heart of Dublin City Centre. Lined with a mishmash of architectural styles, the street is home to numerous banking institutions, restaurants and shops. 

That said, the still-operating Olympia Theater is, perhaps, the most prominent landmark on the street. Opened in 1879, The Olympia Theater is the premier theater and concert hall in the Dublin city center. 

The stage has seen a slew of famous acts from Charlie Chaplin to Mumford & Sons. The theater underwent a major overhaul in the 1970s and the original iron and glass awning had to be completely restored after a truck crashed into it in 2004. For more about the history – and upcoming events – visit the official website . 

Map Directions from Olympia Theater to Dublin City Hall.

#11 Dublin City Hall

View up Parliament Street of Dublin City Hall

Built as the Royal Exchange in the mid-1800s, the building was transferred to the city government and renamed Dublin City Hall in 1850. The building is still used by the Dublin City Council today.

It is free to visit Dublin City Hall. Step inside the rotunda, where giant columns support the domed ceiling. The murals on the walls of the rotunda tell the story of Dublin’s history, which the tiled floor mosaic depicts the city’s Coat of Arms.  

Map Directions from Dublin City Hall to the Dublin Castle.

#12 Dublin Castle

Dublin, Ireland self-guided walking tour: Dublin Castle

Next up on our Dublin historic walking tour is the grand Dublin Castle. The Dublin Castle was built between 1208 and 1220 as the residence of viceroys.

Although the castle is now used as a conference center and event complex, the buildings of Dublin Castle represent some of the oldest architecture in the city. It remains one of the top tourist attractions in Dublin. It is free to walk on the grounds, but a ticket is required for admission inside, where they also offer tours of Dublin Castle. Get more details for you visit.

Map Directions from Dublin Castle to Christ Church Cathedral. 

#13 Christ Church Cathedral of Dublin

Exterior view of Christ Church Cathedral of Dublin, Ireland

The Christ Church Cathedral is the next stop on our tour. One of the top attractions in Dublin, Ireland, the Christ Church Cathedral dates to Medieval times. 

The church was built around the year 1030 – making it older than St. Patrick’s and one of the best places to visit in Dublin for a history lesson. It was expanded in 1171, but most of the current structure was built between 1871 and 1878. An entry ticket is required for admission, unless you are there to pray. Visit the official Christ Church website for more information.

Map Directions from Christ Church Cathedral to John’s Lane Church. 

#14 John’s Lane Church

Exterior view of John’s Lane Church, Dublin, Ireland

Although lesser-known than St. Patrick’s and Christ Church Cathedral, we think the John’s Lane Church is one of the Dublin hidden gems, which is why we include it in our free Dublin walking tour. 

The church was built on the previous site of St. John’s Hospital between 1862 and 1895. The French Gothic steeple reaches over 200 feet and is the tallest in Dublin – however, it is the colorful interior that is most striking. John’s Lane Church is one of the churches you can enter in Dublin for free.

Map Directions from John’s Lane Church to The Brazen Head Pub. 

#15 The Brazen Head

Dublin, Ireland self-guided walking tour: The Brazen Head

Claiming to be Ireland’s oldest pub, The Brazen Head is said to have origins dating back to the year 1198. The classic Irish pub features quaint rooms, three bars and live music. 

The traditional Brazen Head pub is a perfect place to stop for a pint at the end of a Dublin Self-Guided Walking Tour. For more information, read our article about The Brazen Head and be sure to also check out our Guide to Dublin’s Best Pubs !

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MAP OF CITY CENTER DUBLIN, IRELAND

When embarking on Self Guided Walking Tours of Dublin, Ireland, a map is a must! We provided map links to each sight on our free Dublin walk, but we have a few more maps that will help you get from the first to the last stop!

Walking Route for Self Guided Tours in Dublin

Use this  link to Google for a Dublin sightseeing map that has turn-by-turn directions for our Self-Guided Walking Tour Dublin, Ireland. Note: While the map does not list every sight, the route is inclusive of all the stops on our tour.

Dublin Walking Tour Map by JetSettingFools.com

Interactive City Center Map: Dublin, Ireland

Use this link to a Interactive Downtown Dublin Map to help route your way to the sights and attractions listed on our Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour. 

Free Dublin Walking Tour Map by JetSettingFools.com

Dublin, Ireland Self-Guided Walking Tour Map PRINTABLE

This is a printable map of Dublin. To print our Dublin, Ireland must-see map, first click on the map to enlarge it, then right-click and select Print. 

Dublin, Ireland Self-Guided Walking Tour Map Printable by JetSettingFools.com

More Tours and Guided Walks in Dublin

Our above outlined free tour of Dublin is a great way to see the city. In fact, we think it is the Best Free Walking Tour Dublin that allows visitors to see the city at their own pace. 

However, visitors who want to learn more about the history of Dublin and meet fellow travelers may want to consider joining a Dublin tour guide for their walk.

The guided tours in Dublin range in price and duration – and focus on specific themes. 

Dublin Historical Walking Tour

The history of Dublin is fascinating. Join one of the easy 2-hour walking tours of Dublin that focuses on that vibrant history. Led by a local guide, participants are guided through the city while listening to the interesting facts and information that shaped Dublin. Get the details!  

Dublin Pub Crawl

When we think about things to do in Dublin, the first thing that comes to mind is drinking in pubs. We could have easily spent our days in Dublin doing nothing more than sipping pints of Guinness goodness; it really does taste better in Dublin!

However, then we would have missed out on Dublin sightseeing – and we weren’t going to visit Dublin and not see the top tourist attractions!

After a day of Dublin city sightseeing, however, visit the best pubs in Temple Bar on one of the entertaining Dublin night tours to the best bars! Book this tour!

Dublin Dark Side Walking Tour

There is a dark side to Dublin – as evidenced by gruesome stories of the past. On the Dark Dublin Tour participants will learn about the brothels and witches and the Hellfire Club while waltzing through back alleys and dark city streets. Book it…if you dare!

Ghost Tour Dublin

Join one of the Dublin guided tours to the spookiest spots in town! Learn the haunted history of Dublin on a spooky Gravedigger Ghost Tour. Note: This is a bus tour…which will give your feet a much-needed rest. Find out more!

Dublin Literary Pub Crawl

Follow in the footsteps of Ireland’s most famous writers…to the pubs, of course! On this Dublin Literary Tour, listen to stories of the great writers and learn about Dublin’s pub culture. Book the Literary Pub Crawl! 

1916 Tour Dublin

The 1916 Tour is a Dublin history tour that focuses on the events of the Uprising. The 1916 Rebellion Walking Tour includes visiting key locations, re-enactments and multi-media presentations for a unique experience. Learn more!

Pro Tip: Looking for free walking tours about the Easter Rising? Use the Self Guided Dublin Walking Tour audio guide podcast for a basic intro.

Food Tour in Dublin

Join a guide for a grazing tour of Dublin on this highly rated Food Tour. Learn about the history and local cuisine while feasting your way past city sights. Reserve your space!

Alternatively, embark on a journey to experience the contemporary food culture with the best bites at a few of the top restaurants. Get the details!

Street Art Tour Dublin

The city of Dublin has a vibrant street art scene. Visitors interested in learning more about the alternative side of Dublin can join the Street Art Tour to find off the beaten path local haunts. Book it!

Dublin Private City Tour

Those who want a personal introduction can join one of the Dublin Private Walking Tours. On this private tour, visitors get to see Dublin with the help of a local guide. Get the details!

For more themed Dublin walking tours, check out these of Dublin City Tours .  

More Fun Dublin, Ireland Tours

Once you have the lay of the land, indulge in a few essential Dublin experiences and tours.

  • Visit Dublin’s Guinness Storehouse for a connoisseur tasting
  • Head to the Jameson Distillery for a lesson on Irish whiskey
  • Take a River Liffey cruise

Hop On Hop Off Dublin Tour Bus

Visitors interested in sightseeing without all the walking can catch a ride on one of the Dublin Bus Tours. The Dublin sightseeing bus routes make stops at (or near) all of the top attractions. The bus tickets also include other perks, like on-board commentary, discounts at top sights and a guided Dublin walking tour. 

Sightseeing Hop On Hop Off Bus Dublin

The classic, red Hop On Hop Off Tour in Dublin has two routes that stop at 28 places of interest – plus two walking tours included in the price. Visitors can opt for a 1- or 2-Day Pass .  

Green Do Dublin Hop On Hop Off Bus

Do Dublin is another tour company that offers a Hop On Hop Off Dublin, Ireland bus service. In addition to the 24- and 48-hour bus tickets , the Dublin tour company tickets also include transportation to and from the airport, as well as use of all Dublin city bus routes – plus free admission to The Little Museum of Dublin. 

Top Tip : A Dublin City Bus Tour is also included in the Dublin Pass , which can save money on entry into sights, too!

Tours and Day Trips From Dublin, Ireland

Light House View from the Howth Cliff Walk, Ireland

Use the city as a base and explore Ireland on one of many Dublin day trips. Visitors can explore on their own or join one of the highly rated tours that explores the region outside of Dublin City Center.

One of our favorite getaways is a short jaunt to the coastal village of Howth. Visitors can easily plan their own Day Trip To Howth – or book a guided trip . Other simple day trips from Dublin include the beachside community of Bray and the lovely village of Malahide .

Visitors can also travel to Northern Ireland to see the city of Belfast . Again, plan the trip on your own or join a tour from Dublin of Northern Ireland and Giant’s Causeway .

Other popular day tours from Dublin include seeing the stunning Cliffs of Moher (with a stop in quaint Doolin ), Visiting Galway or making a trip to the Blarney Castle (and kissing the Blarney Stone, of course!).  

Dublin day tours are offered by many companies. Read reviews from fellow travelers to find the best Ireland tours from Dublin on Viator ! 

Looking for multi-day Ireland trips? Set out from Dublin to see Ireland highlights on a five-day tour or enjoy the sights of Ireland on a six-day trip . 

Travel Tips For Your Dublin Trip

We have just a few final tips for your trip to Dublin! Planning an Ireland trip can feel a bit overwhelming – so we are outlining the essentials below – like where to stay, how to get there and what to pack.

Also check out our 3 Day Dublin Itinerary and 7 Day Ireland Itinerary for even more things to do! If you are coming from abroad, read our advice on Planning a Trip to Europe . 

As you make your plans, you will find that staying organized is key. To stay on top of all the details, use our Printable Travel Planner , which includes 25+ pages of travel organization! 

Travel Planner Printables by JetSettingFools.com

Where To Stay in Dublin, Ireland

We think the best place to stay in Dublin, Ireland is in the center, where it is easy to access the top sights and attractions on foot.

That said, during the summer tourist season, top value hotels book up quickly – so you will want to make sure you secure Dublin accommodations in advance of your trip. Before you start your search, read our tips for Booking the Best Hotels . 

Two of the highly-rated Dublin hotels are Leonardo Dublin Christchurch and Temple Bar Inn . Budget travelers can search for Dublin Hostels – like  Garden Lane Backpackers . Finding a vacation rental through Airbnb is another option on your vacation to Ireland.

Getting To Dublin, Ireland

Dublin can be reached by plane, train, bus, or ferry. Our preferred method of getting anywhere is by flying, we are JetSettingFools, after all! When we do need to purchase cheap plane tickets , we start our search for the best deals on airline fares on Skyscanner . 

Flying to Dublin from the US is easy, with direct flights from DC , Philadelphia , Boston , NYC , Chicago , and SFO . Additionally, DUB is well-connected with all major European hubs like London , Frankfurt , Paris , Madrid , Lisbon and Amsterdam !

To get between destinations when flights are not possible, we usually rely on public transportation and take trains or buses. Dublin Bus and Bus Eireann provide bus transportation services in Ireland. 

We aren’t keen on driving abroad, but renting a car can often save time and money (especially when traveling with more than two people) – and having a car rental allows for greater discovery.  

Dublin Walking Tours: What You Will Need

Now that you know all about the Best Walking Tours of Dublin – plus other fun activities and essentials – it’s time to get ready for your sightseeing!

Make sure you are prepared by bringing the following items along with you. You can find all of our packing hacks  and advice on our Packing Page  – and grab your FREE packing checklist !

Travel Shoes

Although Downtown Dublin, Ireland is a very walkable, travelers will want to ensure they pack comfortable city walking shoes . I like to wear lightweight, rubber-soled shoes, like Columbia shoes or NB Trainers . Kris prefers wearing Merrell trail shoes, even in the city!

Ireland Weather Attire

The weather in Dublin is always unpredictable. It’s best to bring along a packable raincoat or travel umbrella for your free walking tour of Dublin. For those sunny moments, don’t forget sunglasses ,  sunscreen and a wide-brimmed travel hat . 

Whether you travel with a backpack or a suitcase , you will also want to have a great day bag to organize all your daily travel essentials . When we explore a city on foot, we like to wear small backpacks where we can stow our wallets, keys, map, jacket and umbrella.

Travel Camera

On walking tours of Dublin, Ireland visitors see heaps of top sights. While many travelers use their phone, we believe it is best to invest in an actual travel camera that will take high-quality photographs. We carry a Canon Rebel  with a 18-135mm lens . This DSLR is a perfect budget camera for beginner photographers – as it comes bundled with heaps of accessories and is easy to use! 

WiFi Connection

In our free Dublin Walking Tour, we include map links to get from sight to sight. However, in order to use those links, you will need a WiFi Connection . While many US cellphone providers offer temporary international data packages, they can be expensive! Instead, we recommend purchasing a WiFi Mobile Hotspot . 

Not only can we connect up to ten devices at one time (which is perfect for families or friends traveling together), but we purchase an eSIM in advance and are connected the minute we touch down off that long-haul flight . We would be lost without it – literally! That said, we still think it is also a good idea to carry a paper Dublin map and/or guidebook .

Ireland Travel Insurance

Travel insurance may help in the case of cancelled flights or lost luggage – as well as illness or injury while abroad. Consider traveling protected with World Nomads .

Start planning your trip to Ireland ! Search for the lowest airfares , the best accommodations and fun things to do …then start packing !   Want more travel advice? Head over to our Travel Planning Page for more tips on traveling – and for country-specific information, take a look at our Travel Guides Page !

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Pin it! See all of our travel pins on our JetSetting Fools Pinterest Board .

Dublin, Ireland Self-Guided Walking Tour

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self guided tour in dublin

One Day in Dublin: A Relaxed Self-Guided Tour (A Local’s Guide)

The Ha'Penny Bridge, Dublin, Ireland

‘I was in Dublin once, only for a day though and I don’t really remember it’. This is something I am sad to admit that I hear all too often when people tell me about their stopover in Dublin. Now, I do understand, that many of those who have just one day in Dublin City often want to tick the stereotypical ‘Irish Experience’ off their bucket list. And, to be honest, I don’t blame them.

We Irish sure do know how to have a good time and as a result, it is easy for tourists to fall down the ‘Temple Bar Trap’ so to speak. Without even having the opportunity to experience the ‘real’ Dublin because all their time is spent in the bars. So, what if I told you that you could experience both. Yes, that’s right in just 24 hours, you can tick most of Dublin’s leading tourist attractions off your bucket list and then still have time to party the night away in Temple Bar. Don’t worry if drinking isn’t your thing, I have plenty of alternative suggestions for you to enjoy!

1 day in Dublin Layout

I wasn’t all too sure how to divide this post up, as a local, I know the most convenient way to walk around the city. And considering you only have 1 day in Dublin, I wanted to come up with a stress FREE way for you to see all the highlights, without feeling as if you were doing a marathon or a sprint. My solution was to break the day up into morning, mid-day, evening and night-time activities. You will be glad to hear that all experiences are of walking distance of each other, making it easy for you to do a self-guided tour of Dublin in just one day.

Getting from Dublin Airport to the city centre

An Air Coach runs from the airport into the city centre and at the time of writing costs €12 for a return ticket.

Alternatively, the  41 Dublin bus route is 24 hours and will transport people from  Lower Abbey Street  to the Dublin Airport and vice versa. This is a much cheaper option and is available on the Leap Card.

Dublin Bus, On O'Connell Street, Ireland

Getting Around Dublin City

Public Transport  is the easiest way to get around the city. Services include the bus, Luas and the DART. The easiest way to pay is via the leap card click  here  to find tourist rates.

Dublin Bikes  is another great way to get around the city. It’s FREE for the first 30-minutes. Download the app here ( Android / IOS ).

Getting a  Taxi  is another option, however, they can be rather expensive. If you need a taxi it’s best to download the FREE Now app ( Android / IOS ).

Local Tip: To hail a taxi or stop a bus (at bus stops), you must place your hand out towards the road. Otherwise, they will drive on by.

Where to Stay in Dublin

Below is a list of possible accommodations to stay in on your trip to Dublin. I have personally never stayed in any of them as I live in Dublin. I can, however, point you in the right direction in terms of Budget.

Budget-Friendly Hostel:   Abigail’s Hostel

A Good Location Hotel:   The Moxy Dublin City Hotel

A Good Location/Trendy Apartment:  Locke Zanzibar Aparthotels

Now, I know they are all rather expensive, If you stay a little further outside the city you will for sure get a better deal. Some Area’s with good public transport routes include Rathmines, Terenure and Dundrum.

Where to stay in Dublin Pricing Map

What to pack for dublin.

Ireland is known for getting 4 seasons in the one day, that is why it is best to follow this Ireland packing list  for a detailed guide. I have, however, listed down below some essential items needed for a trip to Dublin.

  • Waterproof Jacket
  • A Day Bag  (<- Also my favourite)
  • A Windproof Umbrella
  • Travel First Aid Kit
  • Water Bottle  (The Tap Water is Drinkable)

One Day in Dublin: Spend the Morning Exploring College Green & Beyond

Dublin Sunset - Stephens Green

Stop 1: Stephens Green, Grafton Street & Molly Malone

I’d highly suggest waking up bright and early to take on Dublin’s beautiful city park, St. Stephen’s Green . The green is one of the many beautiful walks in Dublin . It is a lovely place to begin the day as it helps clear the mind and have you feeling fresh for a fun-filled day of activities. It can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 1 hour to loop around the park depending on which root you take.

Once you have enjoyed the peace and quiet of the green it is time to head toward Dublin’s main shopping district, Grafton Street . However, Grafton Street is not only known for its high-end retail stores. It is also the place to go to see Dublin’s thriving music scene , with buskers from all over the country singing and performing for the public.

As you walk towards the end of Grafton Street take a sharp to the left turn Suffolk Street, here you will find the famous Irish statue, Molly Malone . Take a moment to catch a snap with Molly before making your way to college green.

One Day in Dublin Trinity College Dublin Through a Bicycle Wheel

Stop 2: College Green, Trinity College & The Book of Kells

College Green is home to one of the most iconic universities in all of Dublin, Trinity College . If you are looking for free things to do in Dublin , then walking around the grounds of Trinity is a good option.

Some of the buildings date back as far as 1592 . No matter how many times I stroll the ground of Trinity, I always feel as if I have stepped back in time .

It’s a truly unique experience. And the building kind of gives off Harry Potter Vibes.

Once you have finished exploring it is time to pay a visit one of the top tourist attractions in all of Dublin, the Book of Kells . The world’s oldest book lies right on the grounds of Trinity College and is visited by over 500,000 visitors each year.

Those who purchase tickets to the Book of Kells exhibition can also visit Trinity’s famous Long Room free of charge. The whole attraction is one of my favourites things to do in all of Dublin.

Don’t forget to Book your tickets nice and early to avoid disappointment.

1 Day in Dublin: Take a Mid-Day Stroll through Historic Dublin

The Spire, Dublin, Ireland

Stop 3: The GPO, O’Connell Street & The Spire

Once you have finished walking around the stunning grounds of Trinity College it is time to start walking towards Dublin’s General Post Office, otherwise known as the GPO.

Now, because this is only a 1 day Dublin itinerary we do not have time to enjoy the museum inside the GPO, it is, however, nice to get a picture of the Historic building. The GPO played a big role in Ireland’s fight for independence and if you look really hard the bullet holes from the 1916 rising can still be seen on the building’s exterior.

A little further up O’Connell Street (Dublin’s most famous street) lies the new modern symbol of Dublin’s fair city, The Spire .

When the government announced the plans to build The Spire the public made a mockery of it. However, we quickly learned to love the monument as it can be seen from all angles of the city, making it the perfect meeting point for gatherings.

self guided tour in dublin

Stop 4: The Ha’Penny Bridge & Temple Bar

Once you had a glance high in the sky at the Spire, it is time cross the River Liffey using the famous Ha’ Penny Bridge. This is the Bridge seen all over Instagram and is the gateway into the Temple Bar District .

Temple Bar is an old cobblestone quarter that the most famous spot in Dublin for tourist. It is where the Irish personality, music, and tales come to life. The most popular building who be the official Temple Bar Inn , a red brick pub seen on most postcards and information brochures. Don’t forget to keep an eye out for Dublin Hidden Gems like Find  Rory Gallagher’s Guitar .

This may be a good time to grab a bite to eat, consider eating in the delicious Elephant Castle , or if you fancy designing your own cheesecake, check out the Mad Egg .

Please note, that mad egg is before the crossing of the River Liffey, see google maps for reference.

Christchurch, Dublin, Ireland

Stop 5: Go for a stroll by Dublin Castle, Christchurch & St. Patricks Catedral

Once your Tummy is all full up, it is time to walk towards Dublin Castle . You may be surprised that there is only one section of the castle that in fact looks like a real-life castle. Nonetheless, it is still a significant building in Irish history. You can go inside the castle for a fee , although I suggest skipping this step due to time restrictions.

Following the royal visit, it is time to walk towards the stunning Christchurch Cathedral . The Medieval Cathedral will make you feel as if you are stepping back in time with its a truly unique architecture. Continuing on the with the Medieval theme, a few minutes down the road lies Dublin 2nd Medieval Church, Saint Patricks Cathedral . This is one stunning building, with a beautiful garden adjacent to it.

24 hours in Dublin: Spend the Evening in the home of the Black Stuff

self guided tour in dublin

Stop 6: The Guinness Storehouse

The final stop on today’s self-guided tour of Dublin brings us to the home of the Black Stuff, The Guinness Storehouse .

This is my favourite attraction in all of Dublin. And, that is even a little controversial, as I’m Irish, but I’m not all too fond of the taste of Guinness. My point is, that anyone can visit the famous storehouse without having to like the taste of the Black Stuff! Visit for the brilliant storytelling , to have a laugh trying to pull your own pint and for the phenomenal 360 views of Dublin .

If this sounds like a fun-filled evening, book your tickets now as they sell out fast.

Sunset on the River Liffey

Things to do in Dublin in One Day: Night Time Shenanigans

There are many things to do at night in Dublin, whether you want to enjoy some time on the town or take part in some lesser know activities. I’ve listed down my favourite down below.

Things to do in Dublin at night

  • There are many beautiful places in Dublin to watch the Sunset . The sky lights up in beautiful colours along the River Liffey. Or, if time allows, you could check out some of Dublins walks , there are many that offer some epic sunset locations.
  • If drinking isn’t your scene, why not consider going to see a comedy gig in Vicar Street . Or, visit one of Dublin’s best hidden gems , the Stella Cinema , a vintage cinema complex that transports you back in time.

Best places in Dublin to have a drink

  • Temple Bar is the place to go if you are hoping to listen to some Traditional Irish Music with a modern twist. I must warn you that the district is insanely expensive and you won’t find much Irish hanging about in the pubs. But… It certainly lives up to the stereotypical ‘Irish Experience’.
  • Another great spot for traditional music is just across the street from Temple Bar, Dame Lane . The prices here are slightly cheaper, only slightly though and you may find a local or two jamming out to the great music scene.
  • If you are looking for a nice chill place to have a few drinks with the possibility of having a little boogie as the night progresses. The make your way to Dawson Street , home to some modern bars with little dance floors.
  • For those wanting to dance the night away then the Night Clubs on Harcourt Street is the place for you! It is a whole street dedicated to late-night dancing. If you are brave, you may even find yourself in coppers, dancing the night away until 5 am. Now, you have been warned, coppers can get CRAZY at night, so come prepared.
  • Looking for Cocktails? Check out Pygmalion , Capitol Lounge or Copan (a little bit out of the city).

Stopover in Dublin Map & Suggested Timetable

Suggested Timetable

8.30am – 9.00am:  Breakfast 9.00am- 10.00am:  Saint Stephens Green 10.00am – 10.30pm:   Grafton Street & Molly Malone Statue 10.30am – 12.00pm:  Explore the Grounds of Trinity College and visit the Book of Kells 12.00pm – 1.00pm:  GPO, The Spire & Ha’Penny Bridge. 1.00pm – 2.00pm:  Lunch Break in Temple Bar 2.00pm – 3.30pm:  Dublin Castle, Christ Church & Saint Patricks Cathedral 3.00pm – 5.30pm:  The Guinness Storehouse

When is the best to visit Dublin?

July and August is by far the busiest time of year to visit Dublin due to the typically good weather and schools being on their summer holidays.

June and September are considered the months with the best weather yet the best off peak crowd levels.

Halloween originated in Ireland. There are many Halloween celebrations that take place across the country. Including many events in the city centre.

In November/December time the city is highlight in Christmas lights. It is a truly magical time to visit.

St. Patricks day is on the 17th of March , the streets are packed with those celebrating. March is quite an expensive time to visit, but it is also one of the best months for an eventful trip.

I, however, do not recommend visiting in January or Feb , these months tend to be cold, and we sometimes even get some snow . The days are also very short with it getting dark around 4pm.

Helfire Club Horses Dublin

Have more time in Dublin?

If you are considering spending more time in Dublin then check out my 2 days in Dublin post to further help plan your trip to Ireland . One of the best things about Dublin is the cities location. Dublin is the perfect place to begin or end you Ireland Itinerary . Or, you could base yourself in Dublin and visit some of Ireland’s top attractions on Dublin Day Trips . Below are some of my favourites:

The Cliffs of Moher is Ireland’s leading tourist attraction. It is possible to visit the famous cliffs on a short day trip from Dublin . The drive takes 3 and a half hours in Total.

The Causeway Coast is another popular Day Trip from Dublin, day tours give visitors the opportunity to explore the beautiful Giants Causeway and Game of Thrones filming sites.

Wicklow National Park is just a 50-minute drive from Dublin City. Most will visit the iconic Glendalough to discover some of the best walks in Wicklow . Book your day trip here .

A little lesser known day trip from Dublin is the stunning Stairway to Heaven trail.

You can even explore beautiful towns such as Kinsale on a Dublin day trip. This is the perfect day trip for those looking to catch a glimpse of West Cork .

Walks in Dublin

Another great thing about Dublin is the cities close proximity to the ocean, mountains and surrounding counties. On Dublin’s doorstep there are many wonderful walks to explore. Like, the Hellfire Club for example, this is a nice place to go for a walk in the mountains and enjoy the amazing views.

Or, the nearby Ticknock is a great place to go for a short brisk hike or to watch the sunset over the city.

If you are looking for an uphill walk that is accessible via public transport then consider hiking up Killiney Hill . The walk is nice and easy and offers insane views of both Dublin and Wicklow.

Many of those visiting Dublin tend to get the DART to Bray, a beautiful coastal town in County Wicklow. The journey takes just under 40 minutes and the most popular thing to do in Bray is the Bray to Greystones Cliff Walk . It’s also a nice place to grab a bite to eat before returning to the city.

Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoyed it. If you have any further questions be sure to reach out to me on  Instagram . As Always, happy travels and see you in the next blog!

Disclaimer: Please note that some blog posts on LiveAdventureTravel may contain affiliate links meaning that I may make some commission on purchases made through said links at no extra cost to you.

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Dublin: A Walking Tour of the Main Sights

self guided tour in dublin

Ready to explore Dublin on foot? Follow this guide to cover the compact Irish capital and see all of the main sights without needed to hop on a guided Dublin tour.

Starting Out on O'Connell Bridge

 TripSavvy / Jamie Ditaranto

A walking tour of Dublin, self-guided, does it need a lot of preparation and map-work? Actually, it does not, as Ireland's capital is ideal for a leisurely stroll that will take in most of the top attractions too.

Most of the best sights of Dublin are situated in a comparatively small area. To get a good impression of this lively and historic city you only need to take a walk. And you can travel light as shelter from rain and refreshments can be found virtually everywhere. The whole tour of Dublin's Fair City should take anything between two and six hours - two hours for energetic walkers and without lingering too long at any place, six hours including stops, the Trinity College tour and a pause or two in a café. So put on your walking shoes and off we go ...

Start your walk on O'Connell Bridge, the nearest equivalent of a central place Dublin can boast. Reputed to be one of the only bridge in the world that is wider than it is actually long, this is the heart of Dublin, admire the view for a few minutes, then start walking up O'Connell Street . Cross over to the central reservation and have a good look at the O'Connell Memorial with its magnificent statues full of allegory. See an angel crushing a serpent, spot the faithful Irish wolfhound and notice some bullet holes. These were caused by gunfire during the fighting in 1916 and have never been repaired.

O'Connell Street and the General Post Office

Further statues and "The Spire of Dublin" await you—the latter was erected to mark the millennium and is also known as "The Stiletto in the Ghetto."

Of the impressive buildings on O'Connell Street, the General Post Office  takes pride of place. This was the central fighting area of 1916 but has been lovingly restored - it is open to the public during daytime as it still is Dublin's GPO. Have a look around and maybe buy some commemorative stamps in the Philatelic Office. Then continue up O'Connell Street, past the trompe d'oeil Carlton Cinema and on to the Parnell Statue.

Charles Stewart Parnell is remembered more low-key than O'Connell but his monument is among the most beautiful in Dublin. Walk around it and read the names of all 32 counties ... including pre-independence "King's County" and "Queen's County". Carry on past the "Ambassador" (a former cinema converted to a rock venue) for a walk around Parnell Square. You will pass a small monument with a broken chain and an Irish inscription commemorating the founding of the nationalist Irish Volunteers in 1913 on your left.

The Garden of Remembrance and Moore Street Market

Continue towards the magnificent Presbyterian Church and reach the Garden of Remembrance . These were established to honor all the victims of the fight for Irish independence - at all times. The theme is mythical. The large pond, forming a cross, has representations of discarded bronze age weapons at its bottom. The focus of attention will almost invariably be on the massive statue showing the transformation of the "Children of Lír", an evocative and fitting memorial.

When you leave the Garden continue the walk by turning left and then left and left again, passing the historic (and still very busy) Rotunda Hospital and the low-key headquarters of Sinn Fein until you hit Parnell Street. Turn right and then left again into Moore Street , noticing how Dubliners have elevated jaywalking to an art form. Moore Street itself is a semi-pedestrian zone and a collision of Dublin old and new. Traditional street traders hawk their wares from barrows and you might jostle for a place with a horse looking for a snack. The modern ILAC-Centre is on your right, countless Asian, African and East European "supermarkets" are on your left. Smuggled tobacco and cigarettes are sold next to butchers who do a mean breakfast roll. Take some time to enjoy this truly cosmopolitan and colorful area and then take a right into Henry Street to see South Dublin's premier shopping street.

Ha'penny Bridge, Temple Bar and the Bank of Ireland

TripSavvy / Jamie Ditaranto 

Now turn left into Liffey Street and walk down to the river of the same name. You will see the "Hags with the Bags" on your right just before having to cross the river using Ha'penny Bridge (officially "Liffey Bridge"). Dublin's most photographed river crossing was originally financed by a toll of one Halfpenny, hence the name. Today crossing is free.

On the south bank, a small (and sometimes very smelly) thoroughfare will take you straight into the "bohemian" ​ Temple Bar area, the hub of Dublin's trendy nightlife. Assuming you will make this walk during the daytime you may wonder what the fuss is all about - especially in the mornings Temple Bar is near deserted. Most of the action would be in the streets to the right - have a look and judge for yourself whether to come back later.

For now, you may well walk straight on past the looming Central Bank until you reach Dame Street. Take a left here and walk to College Green. On your left is the stately building that once was Ireland's parliament and now is the Bank of Ireland - take a look at the slightly dated security measures including small cannons. The Irish parliament is known as the only democratic representation that voted itself out of existence, effectively accepting direct British rule at the start of the 19th century.

Trinity College and Environs

TripSavvy / Kathleen Messmer

Exactly opposite to the Bank of Ireland, the entrance to Trinity College can be found - do not, under any circumstances, attempt to cross the road without using the regulated crossings. Even hardened Dubliners only attempt this in utter desperation!

After the crossing, you will want to enter the inner courtyard of Trinity College through the arch. It will be a revelation - a wide-open space with the impressive campanile at its center awaits you. The effect can be stunning, so watch out for fellow visitors stopping dead in their tracks right in front of you. Also, watch out for the more daring students trying to cycle through the narrow entrance! Immediately after coming out into the open again you will be invited to join the tour of Trinity College for a fee of € 10. As this includes the entrance fee for the library and the Book of Kells it is a worthwhile option. Should you have no time or restricted funds just have a look around the college grounds and then exit through the same gateway again.

After leaving Trinity College and turning left you will have to brave throngs of people waiting to catch a bus. On your right, you will see  a statue of Molly Malone in a very kitschy music hall style. Nearly every tourist has his or her photo taken here and some scurrilous street "performers" regularly frequent the site. Watching for a few minutes before continuing to Grafton Street can be very amusing.

Grafton Street, Stephen's Green and Merrion Row

Further on you will then find the pedestrian zone of Grafton Street, Dublin's "posh" shopping area. Do some window shopping but also have a look at the magnificent details to be found on the upper facades of the buildings themselves.

At the upper end of Grafton Street, some excellent buskers can occasionally be found performing on the streets for tips. Don't miss the life-size statue of Phil Lynott in a street to the right. The singer of "Thin Lizzy" was Ireland's rock hero long before Bono.

At the end of Grafton Street, the magnificent Stephen's Green Shopping Centre will dazzle you - the faux-Victorian metal and glass building holds dozens of shops plus a good food court and is the perfect place for a quick refresher.

Opposite the shopping center, you'll then notice the Fusilier's Arch, the grandiose entrance to Stephen's Green proper. Take a leisurely stroll through the park and also take in the surrounding areas. In the park, you will find a number of monuments, a garden dedicated to W.B.Yeats (won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923) with a cryptic piece by Henry Moore, a quaint lodge and numerous ducks on the lakes. You will also find shop assistants, office workers and students having their lunch al fresco .

Exit the park at the Wolfe Tone Memorial (commonly called "Tonehenge" for obvious reasons) in the northeast corner and then turn into Merrion Row. Here you will find the picturesque Huguenot Cemetery on your left and O'Donoghue's Pub on your right - where the seminal folk group "The Dubliners" started their rise to worldwide fame.

Merrion Square and Kildare Street

When you reach Merrion Street turn left and walk past the impressive Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum (the "Dead Zoo") and the National Gallery . You are now in the center of Georgian Dublin and near the Center of Irish politics. Merrion Square is on your right and in the northwest corner, the strange monument to Oscar Wilde is to be admired - opposite his childhood home. If you are feeling energetic take a stroll around the park, originally earmarked for construction of a cathedral. As the Catholic Church ran out of funds and steam for this project the park was presented to the citizens of Dublin. Today it hosts memorials, flowerbeds, pleasant walks and the buried remains of a bomb shelter.

From Oscar Wilde's statue carry on into Clare Street and then straight on to Leinster Street. At the corner of Kildare Street, the former Kildare Street Club can be admired - look at the curious carvings at the windows, from squirrels playing the lute to monkeys playing pool. Today the French Cultural Institute and the Heraldic Museum are based here. Walk up Kildare Street past the National Library and have a look at Leinster House and the National Museum . On a normal day, you will see protesters in front of Leinster house proclaiming worthy or simply bizarre causes. The gardai on duty seem to have seen it all and are usually visibly bored.

Dawson Street, Burgh Quay and the Custom House

Carry on up Kildare Street and at Stephen's Green take a right and then a right again down into Dawson Street. On your right Mansion House, the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin is seen. A palatial building with the Dublin coat-of-arms on display and frequently used for official functions.

Walking on you cross the road at the bottom of Dawson Street and then bear left, following the footpath right past Trinity College, finally taking a right onto College Street. There you have to cross the street opposite D'Olier Street. Admire the gothic Pearse Street Garda Station to your right, the romantic D'Olier-Building in front and the charming bronze sculpture showing the way to the "Screen" cinema in-between. Walk down Hawkins Street towards the Liffey, passing the faux-Tudor building of the Dublin Gasworks on your left. At the end of the street, you will find a nice memorial to a policeman who died saving the lives of Victorian workmen trapped underground.

You are now at Burgh Quay and will have to bear right to walk downstream along the Liffey. Do not worry if the Liffey seems to flow in the opposite direction, this will be just a strong tide coming in. After a short walk, you will have a splendid view of the faithfully restored Custom House on the north bank of the river. Cross over to the Northside using the modern Talbot Memorial Bridge and you will see the International Financial Services Centre on your right, dwarfing the moving Famine Memorial just beside the river.

Back to O'Connell Bridge ... or Further?

From the bridge, you might also see the replica "famine ship" Jeanie Johnston lying at berth in the redeveloped Dublin Docklands to the right. Have a closer look if you like, then head back westwards (or upstream) along the quays, passing Custom House until you come to the unashamedly ugly Liberty Hall (the Trade Union Headquarters) and turn right. Tucked away under the railway overpass and facing Liberty Hall is a memorial to James Connolly, the Irish-American socialist who fought and died with his small Irish Citizen Army in 1916.

Near the tram tracks take a left turn into Abbey Street and you will be guided towards the Abbey Theatre - Ireland's national theatre founded by W.B.Yeats. Unimposing on the outside but still putting on top-notch productions, though the scandals of O'Casey's days seem to be truly a thing of the past. Just a few yards more will bring you to O'Connell Street and O'Connell Bridge is to your left.

Your walking tour of Dublin has ended.

If you still feel energetic (maybe after a coffee and some cake) you could hop on a LUAS tram going westwards. This will take you to the Four Courts, the National Museum in Collins Barracks and on to Kilmainham Gaol. You will also be able to see the sprawling Guinness brewery and could even walk up to the Phoenix Park .

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things to see in dublin

Dublin in a day

Dublin , the captivating capital of the Republic of Ireland, offers a wealth of experiences for visitors. Immerse yourself in the city’s vibrant streets, known for their rich storytelling tradition and lively music scene. As the birthplace of iconic beverages like Guinness and Jameson, exploring Dublin’s pubs is a must. During my recent business trip to Dublin, I set aside an extra day to revisit my favorite spots and embark on a walking adventure through the city center. Join me as I share my self-guided walking tour, highlighting Dublin’s top attractions and the charming pubs I discovered along the way. Whether you’re short on time or seeking a comprehensive day-long exploration, this walking route is an ideal choice.

dublin walking tour

The highlights of Dublin: one day walking tour

This self-guided walking tour of Dublin is approximately 8km (5 miles) long and can easily be covered in a day, including visits to some of the attractions along the way. I ventured off this route many times whenever I spotted something interesting, which resulted in a total walking distance that day of 12+km (7.5 miles). The orange pins in the map represent the top attractions in Dublin covered in the walking route below. The purple pins are Dublin pubs I can recommend.

Dublin Castle

I stayed at the Marlin Hotel , a cool design hotel with a terrific location. From there, it was a short walk to Dublin Castle , my first stop. One of the most important buildings in Irish history, Dublin Castle was constructed in the 13th century on the site of a Viking settlement.

top things to see in dublin

Chester Beatty Library

Within the castle grounds, I visited the Chester Beatty Library , often mentioned as the best museum in Dublin. Formerly the library of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (a 20th century mining magnate), the museum houses his incredible collection of ancient manuscripts, rare books and miniature paintings. Entrance is free and it’s absolutely worth a visit!

dublin in a day

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

From Dublin Castle, I made my way to St. Patrick’s Cathedral and its adjacent park. The national Cathedral of the Church of Ireland, St. Patrick’s Cathedral was built in the 13th century and features a stunning nave and beautiful stained glass windows.

dublin highlights walking tour

Christ Church Cathedral

I continued my ‘Cathedral Hop’ with a visit to the Christ Church Cathedral (or the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity). Constructed in the 12th century, this medieval Cathedral is even older than St. Patrick’s.

dublin top sights

If you have time, continue up Lord Edward Road to the Guinness Storehouse , the famous brewery and museum. There are also panoramic views of Dublin from the Guinness Gravity Bar.

River Liffey

From the Christ Church cathedral, I walked down Lord Edward Street to the Dublin City Hall before turning left towards the River Liffey . The river is lined by beautiful, historic buildings on both banks.

river liffey walk

I crossed the river and continued my walk along the promenade to one of Dublin’s most iconic structures, the Ha’penny Bridge . If you’re following this Dublin walking route, consider visiting the Jameson Distillery on Bow Street, not far from the river. You can also buy a combined skip-the-line ticket for Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.

things to see in dublin in a day

I crossed the Ha’Penny Bridge to the Temple Bar district. It’s one of my favourite areas in Dublin because of its lively pubs, vintage shops and colourful street art. I explored the streets and lanes in Temple Bar, looking for cool street art and simply soaking up the vibes, even if it was early in the afternoon.

best places to visit in dublin

Don’t miss the world famous Temple Bar Pub , where bands often perform. If you have time, check out the Irish Rock ‘n’ Roll Museum in Curved Street. Temple Bar is also the perfect area for a lunch break as there are many restaurants, cafés and pubs serving food. I had a meal at Elephant & Castle .

Molly Malone

From Temple Bar, I walked up Church Lane to St. Andrew’s Street, the location of the Molly Malone statue. Molly Malone is from a song called Cockles and Mussels, the city’s unofficial anthem. A statue representing the character in the song was unveiled in 1988. Over the years, the practice of rubbing her bosom for luck became popular among tourists, resulting in a very polished bosom!

molly malone statue dublin

Irish Whiskey Museum

I continued my walk and stopped at the Irish Whiskey Museum . I enjoyed the interactive exhibits that tell the history of whiskey in Ireland, followed by a whiskey tasting.

whiskey museum dublin

Trinity College

My next stop was Trinity College , across the road from the Irish Whiskey Museum. Established in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, Trinity College is another iconic Dublin landmark. One of Europe’s most prestigious academic institutions, the main attraction for tourists is the Library , which houses important artifacts such as the Book of Kells and an ancient wooden harp, the national emblem of Ireland.

dublin top attractions

National Museum of Ireland

From Trinity College, I continued my walk along Kildare Street, the location of the Irish Parliament . Surrounding the Parliament are several notable institutions and museums such as the National Library , the National Gallery of Ireland and the National Museum of Ireland . I ventured into the National Museum (free entrance) and found a stunning interior with interesting exhibits and stories of voyages, battles and struggles.

best dublin museums

St. Stephen’s Green

After the museum, it was time for another break so I headed to nearby St. Stephen’s Green , one of Dublin’s most popular parks. I found a bench to enjoy the sunshine and beautiful greenery. Instead of the park, if you’d like to visit another nearby museum, I recommend the Little Museum of Dublin opposite the park.

dublin park

Grafton Street

From the park, I headed for Grafton Street , Dublin’s main shopping street. Near the top of the street, you’ll find Brown Thomas , Ireland’s answer to Harrod’s.

dublin shopping street

George’s Street Arcade

I turned off Grafton Street into Wicklow Street and explored the surrounding neighbourhood, with its countless restaurants and pubs. On previous trips to Dublin, I visited Mary’s Bar & Hardware (a pub in a ‘hardware’ store!), Grogan’s (a Dublin institution) and the quirky The Hairy Lemon . I ended up at the George’s Street Arcade , a shopping arcade inside a stunning brick building.

dublin shopping arcade

Whitefriar Street Church

I continued up Aungier Street to my final stop: Whitefriar Street Church . A friend of mine mentioned this church to me. One of the most popular churches in central Dublin, Whitefriar Street Church is home to important relics of St. Valentine, a gift from Pope Gregory XVI in the 19th century. Since then, the church has become a popular pilgrimage site especially during Valentine’s Day.

st valentine church dublin

I ended my walk at The Long Hall , just down the road from the Whitefriar Street Church, for a well-deserved Guinness. This historic pub has a striking Victorian interior and a great ambiance.

self guided tour in dublin

Read bout my drive along the Wild Atlantic Way on Ireland’s rugged west coast and my visit to the stunning Cliffs of Moher .

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2 Responses

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Hello there! I just finished reading your article on the Dublin highlights walking tour, and I must say, it’s a fantastic guide that showcases the vibrant city of Dublin. Your article provides a comprehensive itinerary that allows readers to explore the best of Dublin’s cultural and historical treasures on foot.

I appreciate how you’ve highlighted the must-visit attractions and hidden gems that make Dublin such a captivating destination. From the iconic Trinity College and St. Patrick’s Cathedral to the lively Temple Bar area and the charming streets of Dublin’s Creative Quarter, your walking tour covers a diverse range of experiences. Your descriptions and historical insights add depth to the itinerary, making it even more intriguing.

Furthermore, your practical tips on where to grab a bite to eat and where to enjoy a pint of Guinness along the way are highly appreciated. It’s evident that you have a deep knowledge of Dublin and have curated this walking tour to offer an immersive experience for visitors.

Thank you for sharing this insightful walking tour of Dublin. Your article has sparked my wanderlust and made me eager to explore the city’s rich history and vibrant culture. Keep up the fantastic work, and I’ll be eagerly waiting for more of your travel guides and recommendations.

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Awesome walking tour of Dublin! Love this – thanks for this. And yes I love it that you ended the tour with a pint of Guinness!

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self guided tour in dublin

Routes and Trips Travel Guide with Maps and Photos

Self-guided dublin walking tour: dublin’s top sights.

Posted by: Liisa Nygård

I spent a week in Dublin, walking a lot each day. That made me plan a self-guided Dublin walking tour and mark it on a map. My tour will show you the best of Dublin – in a day, two days or using a week, whatever you like.

Ireland’s  cosmopolitan  capital draws millions of tourists. The city has something that makes people return, time after time.

Maybe the pubs with live Irish music, or maybe Dublin’s past, present or future? Or is it the Liffey and other waterways with old Georgian houses and Dublin doors?

My walk will take you to the banks of the Liffey were most Dublin sights are and follow the Grand Canal to Dublin’s Georgian streets and coloured doors, like this one:.

A Dublin door, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Self-guided Dublin walking tour: a Dublin door

Dublin is an ideal city to walk around. It’s not too big to walk as the population is only half a million. Dublin centre is small enough to stroll through and there’s seldom too much traffic. All this makes walking the best way to explore Dublin. though there are hop on hop off buses and arranged Dublin tours as well.

Dublin has a small centre but the whole metropolitan area has almost 2 million people which is a third of Ireland’s total population. Ireland has 5 million people.

It could be more, 10 million  people have left the country over the centuries. That makes there are 17 million people with an Irish background spread around the world. So in a way Dublin is the capital of a big nationality.

My Self-guided Dublin Walking Tour on the Map

This is a map of Dublin city centre with the river Liffey running through it. The red marker points at Temple Bar where my self-guided walking tour starts. We first walk south of the Liffey and return north along the Grand Canal that is in west.

North of the Liffey we walk west along the quays and cross the famous Ha’penny Bridge back to Temple Bar. Then we will still visit Dublin Castle and Christ Church Cathedral in the city’s old part.

Of course it’s not mandatory to start at Temple Bar. You can start wherever you like or walk in the opposite direction. This walk has no rules.

Zoom in the map to see more details or zoom it out to see Dublin in another scale.

The Temple Bar, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Self-guided Dublin walking tour: a Temple Bar pub

Temple Bar is the heart of the city that most tourist want to see first and that’s why the self-guided Dublin walking tour starts there too.

What Temple Bar is famous for are the pubs. There are pubs in every street corner and more pubs in between so you can’t visit every pub. Most of them are traditional Irish pubs and look very old.

Temple Bar is one of the oldest areas in Dublin and it dates back to Viking times. Over centuries craftsmen and merchants moved to these narrow quarters that got their name from Sir William Temple who owned the land.

Click on these small photos of Temple Bar to see them in a slideshow:

The Norseman, Dublin

Walking up and down these cobbled streets you will hear Irish music drift from pubs. Mostly exactly the kind of Irish music you recognize, the kind of music people all over the world love. The Irish that left abroad packed Irish music in their suitcases.

Look inside the pubs and sit down for a while and listen, but not too long. This is a self-guided Dublin Walking Tour and we have to go on. You can come back and you sure want to!

Temple Bar Pharmacy

The colourful area of Temple Bar, Dublin

But Temple Bar has more than the pubs, it’s a large entertainment area with theatre, art exhibitions, galleries and so on. And all venues look like pubs, or what do you say about this one?It’s a pharmacy.

This pub fills the narrow gateway that leads to Ha’penny Bridge. We will come back to that well known bridge later.

Temple Bar, Dublin

Self-guided Dublin walking tour: an Irish pub

More Dublin Pubs

As we are in Ireland there are Irish pubs all over the city, not just in Temple Bar. We found great pubs east of St Stephen’s Green (this Dublin walking tour will bring you there too) and those pubs were not touristic at all. In Temple Bar most pub guests are tourists.

Palace Bar, Dublin

Another Irish pub

This pub is next to Trinity College that is what we will see next.

Trinity College

Trinity College, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Dublin’s Trinity College

Trinity College is a world-famous university and highly respected. The college was built before year 1600 and for hundreds of years, until the 1970’s, they only let protestants in to study.

The Trinity College courtyard has green lawns for students to sit, an old clock tower and many beautiful old buildings – and a huge tree to give shade. The tree is like a well planned monument.

Self-guided Dublin walking tour,Trinity College

Even if you are not a student you are free to walk on Trinity College grounds. But to get to the library you will need a ticket.

Trinity College Library

Trinity College Library has a huge 64 metres long room with 200 000 old books and there are more books in other rooms. This is Ireland’s biggest book collection. All books are not Irish and a part of them came from the Dutch prime minister’s book collection.

Self-guided Dublin walking tour,Trinity College Library

The old library of Trinity College

Trinity College Library also has Ireland’s oldest harp and the Irish national script, the Book of Kells.

The Book of Kells is a book in four parts that has the four gospels written down in Latin. Monks in other parts of Ireland did the job over 1000 years ago and the book finally came to Dublin in 1653.

Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College Library old harp

These photos show the Book of Kells, but I can’t show you the original. I only have photos on Book of Kells souvenirs from the bookstore. It was not allowed to take any photos on the real one.

But you can see the writing: the monks wrote in Latin but used Celtic letters. They decorated the each chapter with large initial letters that had many colours. And to end the lines they used decoration as well. Book of Kells also has beautiful picture pages that include a lot of symbols. The exhibition explains that all.

Trinity College Library Dublin

Statues in Trinity College Library

Sooner of later you will want to leave the dusty library. Take Grafton Street south.

Grafton Street is Dublin’s most important shopping street and leads to St Stephen’s Park that has a lot of flowers and a pond. There is another park too, Merrion Square that has beautiful Georgian houses around it.

In general this area has a lot of old Georgian houses that have colourful doors, doors of Dublin.

Doors of Dublin

A Dublin door

A Dublin door

The residential area south of Temple Bar and Trinity College was built in the Georgian time in the 1700’s and 1800’s. Dublin was one of the most important cities in the British Empire, second only to London and Dublin needed to grow.

Wealthy families built their houses south of the Liffey and they built them all in the Georgian style. The rules said that all houses have to look the same. That’s what they really do.

But the families didn’t like it that way and made the doors individual. The result was that each door in a house has a different colour.

Dublin door

You can see coloured Dublin doors around Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square south of it and on Baggot Street between them. And there are more doors around the Grand Canal.

Emerald green, royal blue,  deep purple, bright yellow, black and white, turquoise and of course red doors. And why not pink:

Dublin door

Another coloured door

Dublin Georgian house gate

A typical Dublin iron gate

And Georgian houses all have some great details like iron gates and apartments below ground level. I loved walking around and snapping photos on these Georgian houses and we even stayed in one. We rented an apartment and our Georgian Dublin door was black.

Dublin Museums

Archaeology Museum, Dublin

Dublin self-guided walking tour: visiting museums

The area south of the Liffey is an interesting place for tourists. There are a lot of Irish pubs that have live music and some great museums. There is the Irish National Gallery, Natural History Museum, the Irish National Museum – Archaelogy, the National Library and a museum called Science Gallery.

The museums I went to happened to be free so it was easy to drop in and have a look. You can do that on rainy days, probably you will have them during your Dublin stay. Dublin weather is hard to predict, or you can predict that it’s going to change in a minute.

Archaeology Museum Dublin

National Museum – Archaeology exhibition

The photos are from the National Museum – Archaeology that opened my eyes to Irish history. The museum is full of old findings from prehistoric and Viking times and from medieval Ireland and some of these findings are from places where I have been to in this country so I know where they come from.

That’s imposing, thousands of years old pottery and jewellery from the Irish countryside!

Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour along the Grand Canal

Grand Canal, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Dublin self-guided walking tour: walking along the Grand Canal

Did you know Dublin has more waterways than the Liffey? There are the canals that were originally built for transport needs. The Grand Canal is the longest of them. It makes a 6 km loop around Dublin city centre.

There is no traffic more, just occasional house boats. And you can see more Dublin doors behind the canal.

Grand Canal Dublin

I would like to walk the whole loop but didn’t have time with that. But you can do it if you like. So my self-guided Dublin walking tour only covers a part of the Grand Canal.

We are walking along the canal from the old Georgian part of Dublin to its modern part, the Docklands.

Self-guided Dublin walking tour, Grand Canal reflections

The Grand Canal of Dublin, Ireland

It’s quite a difference if you can walk along a waterway compared to ordinary streets. You hear the birds and sit down for a while like my husband Clas did while I took photos on Dublin doors. There was someone else too, the Irish sculptor Rowan Gillespie.

Rowan Gillespie statue, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Two men sitting in a Dublin park

Dublin Docklands

Self-guided Dublin walking tour: Dublin Docklands

This is the Grand Canal Docklands a bit north, a new built area where red sticks are used as a decoration. That reminds me of boating on the lake which is my summer hobby.

The Docklands has mainly office buildings but there are hotels and culture venues as well.

Dublin Grand Canal Quay, self-guided Dublin walking tour

This (below) is Bord Gais Energy Theatre, also called Grand Canal Theatre, on a huge square built in 2007. It certainly brings a lot of energy to the docklands.

Bord Gais Energy Theatre

Bord Gais Energy Theatre

Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour: Liffey Riverside

Samuel Beckett bridge, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Samuel Beckett bridge

The Grand Canal waterway takes you back to the Liffey that you can cross along s a modern bridge, Samuel Beckett bridge that looks like a harp. Beckett was a writer and a Nobel Prize winner and a Trinity College student. The harp bridge was designed by a Spanish architect inspired by Irish music.

Convention Centre and River Liffey

One of the new buildings across the bridge looks like a Guinness glass. But Guinness that is a Dublin sight too, is in west. This is a new landmark in Dublin, the Convention Centre Dublin. An American-Irish architect designed it and building it took a long time. The CCD opened for international business visitors in 2010.

The Convention Centre Dublin says it can take up to 8000 conference guests and there are 22 meeting rooms. The Guinness glass hides a large atrium that has curved walls and many escalators. A great example of what modern architecture can do! I came here many times since Clas was working here the whole weekk.

Convention Centre, Dublin

Convention Centre Dublin

The CCD represents modern Ireland and nearby there is something that takes you back to the old days. The Jeanie  Johnston Tallship shows us the hard times Ireland has had.

The Great Famine

The Jeanie Johnston is a museum ship that shows how Irish emigrants left their homes when they were starving during the Great Famine and had to take the weeks long trip on rocky ocean waves and begin a new live in the New World.

Jeanie Johnston, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Jeanie Johnston, self-guided Dublin walking tour

The Great Famine lasted for years around 1850 and changed Ireland quite a bit. One million people died from the lack of food and one and a half million left the country, most of them with ships similar to the Jeannie Johnston.

These quayside statues by the Dublin sculptor Rowan Gillespie bring back the Great Famine. They touch so much.  The sculptor himself sits on a bench by the Grand Canal. Maybe you walked by him?

The Great Famine memorial, Dublin

The quays are a wonderful area to walk along and there are good places to sit down. It’s mostly a modern area, office blocks and so, but old harbour equipment has been saved as well. And there are many bridges across the Liffey for cars, walkers and trains.

Sitting on Liffey river bank, Dublin

Sitting by the Liffey

Self-guided Dublin walking tour, a Liffey railway bridge

A Liffey bridge

And you can learn more about the Great Famine and Irish history:

EPIC, the Irish Emigration Museum

Epic, self-guided Dublin walking tour

EPIC, the Irish Immigration Museum

I said in the beginning that 10 million people have left Ireland and told that one and a half million left in the Famine years. When did all the others leave? You will get to know that in this glass building. It is the Irish Emigration Museum EPIC.

The museum shows Irish history in a modern, interactive way. I was planning just to drop in and finally spent hours in the museum listening to Irish stories and learning about Irish culture.

Entrance to Epic, Dublin

The focus of EPIC is yet on when, why and how so many people left Ireland, where they went and what they did in their new home country. Very fascinating stories and a very nice way to show it all. The museum has got a lot of praise and I agree. If you can go and see EPIC.

EPIC The Irish Immigration Museum

Epic, Dublin

Entrance to EPIC, the Irish Immigration Museum

Self-guided Dublin Walking Tour: North of the Liffey

Custom House, Dublin

Dublin’s Custom House

Walking north of the Liffey there is this large building. It is called Custom House but it is a government office. The Irish built this huge custom house but after a while custom business moved to London. Neither is a custom house needed in today’s EU.

Custom House dome, Dublin

These photos show O’Connell Street that is the main street between north and south in Dublin. There is the Old Post Office, in fact it’s only the facade of it. The rest was destroyed in an uprising in 1916 that finally led to Irish independence.

Self-guided Dublin walking tour: O'Connell Street, the Spire

Dublin self-guided walking tour: the Monument of Light.

This is the Spire. Its real name is the Monument of Light. It is 120 m high and made of stainless steel. It’s three metres wide in the beginning and 10 cm wide at the top.

Ha’penny Bridge

On Ha’penny Bridge

Ha’penny bridge is what most people think about when they hear the word Dublin and you can see the bridge here. The bridge links Temple Bar to the north and 30 000 people cross the bridge each day.

There is no fee but there used to be. That’s what the name comes from. For over a hundred years they took a fee for crossing the bridge, a half penny.

Self-guided Dublin walking tour, Ha'penny Bridge over Liffey

The half penny bridge was made by an English iron worker in 1816. He made the bridge of cast iron and painted it white. He designed nice gates and on the top he put iron lanterns. Ha’penny bridge, the symbol of Dublin.

Ha'penny bridge, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Crossing the Liffey on Dublin’s Ha’penny Bridge

Ha’penny Bridge takes you back to Temple Bar and beyond it, to the old part of Dublin. There is the Dublin Castle.

Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour: Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle dining room

Interior of Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle is located in the place Dublin got its name from. There was a dark pool (Dub Linn) that later on got covered. You don’t see much about the old centre of Dublin. But Dublin Castle is left, rebuilt over centuries and added to.

Originally built in 1204 by King John of England the castle was the headquarters of the English that ruled Ireland for the next 750 years. Since Ireland got independent in 1922 Dublin Castle is the place for Ireland’s big state events.

Dublin Castle state apartments

One of the halls of Dublin Castle

Self-guided Dublin walking tour: Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle, Ireland

The present Georgian palace was added in the 18th century and there are the castle’s state apartments that you can visit. The state apartments consist of dining and drawing rooms and a throne room. All rooms are very decorative.

Self-guided Dublin walking tour, Dublin Castle, St. Patrick's Hall

St Patrick’s Hall,  Dublin Castle

This is St Patrick’s Hall that used to be the castle’s ballroom. Today it is the most important ceremonial room in Ireland. It is a hall with beautiful ceiling paintings and many banners on sides. They are banners of the knights of St Patrick.

Dublin Castle

Christ Church Cathedral

Christ Church Cathedral Dublin

The 1038 Christ Church Cathedral

Christ Church Cathedral is close to Dublin Castle and it is Dublin’s oldest building. A Norse king and an Irish bishop built the cathedral in 1038 after the Normans took over the city.

Christ Church Cathedral has changed its form since but there is an old leaning wall inside and other old parts remain. And you have to see the interior decoration. You can also see that if you go on a concert in the church.

Christ Church Cathedral, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin

Self-guided Dublin Walking Tour Ends

Self-guided Dublin walking tour: the Liffey

Self-guided Dublin walking tour along Dublin waterways

If you followed my Dublin walking tour you have been walking 8 km in a day which is quite a bit. You deserve a beer in Temple Bar, and Irish live music. Hoping to meet you one day in Dublin and have a great evening!

Pint of Guinness, self-guided Dublin walking tour

Have a great Temple Bar evening!

More on Dublin and Ireland

  • Maybe you want to make a day trip from Dublin? Check out my post  Giants Causeway Day Trip from Dublin
  • Or rent a car and head to the Wicklow Mountains?  Wicklow Mountains Scenic Drive from Dublin
  • We also have a guest post about a road trip around Ireland: Road Trip in Ireland: Dublin to Galway, Moher and Cork

Giants Causeway climbing on stone columns

Giants Causeway day trip from Dublin

Read about European Cities

  • Amsterdam, Antwerp, Bruges and Gent
  • Tallinn Old Town
  • Palma de Mallorca

Trinity College has admitted Catholics since the 1870s. It was the Catholic Church itself that forbade it’s members from attending without specific permission until 1970.

Thank you for your lovely walking tour and for your information and photos of Giant’s Causeway. We are planning a trip in the near future to Ireland and your site has been very helpful. We can’t wait!

So glad to hear you find my site helpful. I also recommend you go and see Wicklow mountains, I went there too but didn’t write about it yet. You can rent a car or take a bus tour.

This was very helpful! Thank you! We are visiting in May and spending 2 nights in Dublin. How is parking around town? We plan on staying in outer Dublin as the hotel prices are cheaper, but want to go into the city.

I’m sure you will have great days in Dublin, May is a wonderful time to visit! But I have to say I don’t know about parking. We only rented a car to make a day trip to Glendalough and Wicklow mountains so I don’t have any experience in parking in the city.

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Discovering Dublin on foot: a walking tour itinerary

Are you ready to discover Dublin’s most iconic landmarks and scenic views on foot? Lace up your most comfortable walking shoes because we have the perfect itinerary.

Ha´Penny Bridge Dublin small Tourism Ireland

Lisbeth Wahl

"The friendliness and hospitality of the Irish people makes the Irish capital a wonderful city to explore. History, art and culture as well as a lively pub life with live music is a mix that welcomes visitors to Dublin again and again. I discover new places every time I visit Dublin."

Lisbeth is one of our travel consultants

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Add to favourites, interested in visiting dublin, have a look at our recommended tours, about this self-guided walking tour in dublin.

In 3 hours, explore Dublin and discover some of the city’s most famous attractions, including the Spire, Dublin Castle, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Trinity College and much more. We’ve carefully curated this itinerary to ensure you get the most out of your time in the city.

Duration : 3 to 4 hours

Highlights : The Spire, Ha’Penny Bridge, Temple Bar, Dublin Castle, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, St. Stephens Green, the Little Museum of Dublin, Grafton Street, Trinity College, the Custom House, National Museum of Ireland, Merrion Square.

Start your tour at The Spire

Our tour begins at the highest landmark in Dublin, The Spire. Hard to miss, the “Monument of Light” as it is also known, is a 120 metres high monument located in the heart of the city. This pin-like monument was unveiled in 2003 and is said to point the way to a bright and limitless future.  

The Spire, Dublin. Photo © 1Soanes via canva.com.jpg

Ha’Penny Bridge

The Ha’penny Bridge is not Dublin's most impressive bridge, but it is the city’s most famous and charming pedestrian bridge because of its history. Originally called the ‘Wellington Bridge’, it became known as the 'Ha’Penny Bridge’ because pedestrians had to pay a ‘halfpenny’ to cross to the North Side. Don’t worry, there is no longer a charge. This old bridge is the main gateway between the Northside and the Temple Bar which continues the itinerary.

Ha'Penny Bridge

It is considered as the best nightlife area in Dublin. Temple Bar is a lively riverside neighbourhood with crowded pubs, restaurants to suit all tastes and local shops. If you are looking for a traditional Irish night out, we recommend going to The Temple Bar pub which dates back to 1840. Try one of the 450 different types of whiskeys while listening to live Irish music.

Temple Bar

Dublin City Hall

Continue the tour by walking to Dublin City Hall, also known as The Royal Exchange. You will be amazed by the building’s Georgian architecture. If you have the time, City Hall is worth a stop and a visit inside to admire the Rotunda’s dome supported by twelve columns, as well as the colourful murals, ornate marble floors and statues.

Dublin City Hall

Dublin Castle

The next stop in our itinerary is Dublin Castle, one of the most important buildings in Irish history. The city’s history dates back to Viking times. The castle was built in the 13th century on an ancient Viking settlement and served as a military fortress, a prison, and the seat of British power in Ireland until its independence. The castle is now a government complex. 

Dublin Castle

Christ Church Cathedral

Stroll down Castle Street and soon you´ll reach Christ Church Cathedral, in the heart of Medieval Dublin. Admire the architecture and beauty of this 1,000-year-old Cathedral which was originally a Viking Church. It also houses the famous 12-century crypt, one of the oldest and largest in Ireland and Britain.

Christ Church Cathedral

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

As we continue, we’ll encounter St. Patrick’s Park which leads to the country’s largest Cathedral, St. Patrick’s Cathedral. This Roman Catholic Cathedral which is also the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland was built between year 1220 and 1260. It is one of the few buildings left from medieval times. 

St Patrick Cathedral

St. Stephen's Green

Continue walking through the streets of Dublin to St. Stephen’s Green. This Victorian Park is a public garden offering an oasis of calm in the centre of Dublin. Stroll through the park, past the colorful flowers, herbaceous borders, and the ornamental lake, and admire the sculptural monuments important to Irish history.

St Stephen Park

Little Museum of Dublin

If time allows it, a visit to the Little Museum of Dublin is a must during your stay in Dublin. This museum housed in an 18th-century Georgian house, is one of Dublin’s most popular museums, where you can learn more about Dublin’s history.

Little Museum of Dublin

The shopping area of Grafton Street

Our tour takes us to Grafton Street also known as Ireland’s Premier shopping street. It is Europe’s busiest shopping street, full of shops, gift shops cafés, pubs, and restaurants. Take a stroll along the street, do some shopping, and enjoy some of the street entertainment that often takes place throughout the day.

Grafton Street

Trinity College

At the end of Grafton Street, walk straight to Trinity College, Ireland’s oldest university. You can explore the campus and book a ticket to the Old Library, one of the world’s most beautiful libraries. Here, you can discover one of the greatest treasures of Irish Culture, The Book of Kells.  

Trinity College

The Custom House

Continue walking until you reach River Liffey and walk along the river. Admire the Custom House, an 18th-century architectural masterpiece building standing proudly on the north docks of the river. It is now home to the Department of Environment, Heritage, and Local Government.  

The Custom House, Dublin

National Museum of Ireland

Next stop of the tour is the National Museum of Ireland. Here you can step back in time, and visit the Museum of Archaeology. Discover famous Celtic artifacts, and ancient Gold, Viking, and Medieval items that will take you back to 7,000 BC. You can also visit the Natural History Museum to see galleries of animals from Ireland and geological exhibits.

National Museum of Ireland sign

Merrion Square

Our last stop, Merrion Square, is next to the National Museum of Ireland. Explore the Georgian Square where famous people such as Daniel O’Connell or Oscar Wilde once lived. Admire the architecture of the Georgian Houses before relaxing in the central park after the long walk through the city. Note. In Winter, the park is open from 10:00 to 17:00 hrs.

Merrion Square Park

Aug 24 2023

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Ultimate Dublin Walking Tour Map

Must see attractions using three dublin walking tour map and guide, walk 1 – top 18 attractions, using the dublin walking tour map and guide to dublin center.

  • Dublin Self Guided Walking Tour Map and Guide -Walk 2 – Top 16 attractions, guide to attractions south of the River Liffey, including the Temple Bar Region , click HERE
  • Dublin Walking Tour Map Walk 3 – Top 16 attractions, guide to Historic Dublin , click HERE

Use the Dublin walking tour map below to visit the attractions in Downtown central Dublin located north of the River Liffey. A complete self guided walking tour map and guide to Dublin attractions, including Monuments, Museums, and Memorials. Follow the walking route in purple below, to explore the city at your own place. Spend a few hours or two days depending on how you want to complete all three Dublin walking tours using the map of attractions. There are three separate walking tours: Tour 1- Downtown Central Dublin located north of River Liffey, Tour 2 – Temple Bar Region, St Stephens Green and Grafton Street located south of River Liffey and Tour 3 – Historic Dublin includes Dublin Corporation, Dublin City Hall (and includes parts of the Temple Bar Region)

Dublin Walking Tour and Map 1 – Start at O’Connell street, near the Charles Parnell monument. Break after national Leprechaun Museum and continue to Walk 2

Download the INTERACTIVE Dublin walking tour map HERE

Dublin Self Guided Walking Tour 1

Download the PDF Dublin walking tour map HERE

Start the dublin walking tour guide and map – walk 1, 1. charles stewart parnell monument .

Charles Parnell was a popular Irish politician who fell from the party ranks because of this affair and his eventual marriage to a divorced woman, Katherine O’Shea. This was frowned upon in the very Catholic community and his political party split over the “O’Shea Affair”. Tragically he died from stomach cancer four months after his marriage to Katherine. He was 45 years old

2. Sir John Gray Statue 

This is the second stop in the Dublin walking tour guide and map. Sir John Grey, Physician, Politician and Social Reformer, his statue was sculpted by Thomas Farrell out of Portland limestone which resembled marble. Erected 4 years after his death in 1879, he was the owner of the nationalist Freeman’s Journal newspaper and chairman of the Dublin Corporation Water Works Committee. He was a great supporter of Daniel O’Connell and was instrumental in bringing fresh water supply to Dublin and its suburbs in 1868. His legacy includes the Irish Church and Land Bills, his support of the Home Rule Movement and his advocacy for tenants rights

3. O’Connell Street

The next step in the Dublin walking tour guide and map is the popular O’Connell Street. In the 17th century, O’Connell Street was a narrow street called Drogheda Street, named after the Earl of Drogheda, Henry Moore. The street was widened n the late 1700s and renamed Sackville Street after Lionel Sackville, Duke of Dorset. In 1924 it was been a once again renamed as O’Connell Street after the widely popular political leader Daniel O’Connell. O’Connell St. leads to O’Connell Bridge and onto other Dublin sights such as parliament hill and Trinity College

O’Connell Street is a popular and busy throughfare and was the centre stage for many events in Irish history. It tells the story of Ireland’s history, politics and spirit through the various attractions found on the street. Eclipsed by the popular shopping street, Grafton street, O’Connell street is a must visit street in Dublin. Today it contains prominent monuments, public art and is still the centre of public celebrations, parades, protests and demonstrations and it has major bus and tram routes

Video of O’Connel Street in 1916

4. st mary’s pro-cathedral .

St Mary’s Pro-cathedral is a parish church temporarily or provisionally elevated to the status of Cathedral hence the prefix Pro-Cathedral. It was a temporary solution as the two National Cathedrals in Dublin, St Patrick’s and Christ Church, were originally catholic but now serve the minority protestant population under the Church of Ireland. The Church of Ireland took control of the Catholic St Patrick’s and Christ Church following Henry VIII break from Rome and the start of the Reformation

The Penal Laws (1607-1778) prevented Catholics from worshipping publicly and as such, they worshipped “underground”. With the repeal of the penal laws the city was left without a Catholic church to serve the majority religion. In 1803 Archbishop John Thomas Troy purchased  Lord Annesley’s townhouse in the city for the purpose of building a full Roman Catholic Cathedral. The Cathedral was opened in 1825 by the new Archbishop of Dublin, Daniel Murray and unofficially given the title of Pro-Cathedral. This title of Pro- Cathedral became official in 1886.

A symbol of Irish Nationalism, the Pro-cathedral of St Mary’s has hosted presidents, governments, foreign ambassadors and the location of some state funerals. In 2018, the Pro-Cathedral was visited by Pope Francis.  Great debates over the decades have taken place to establish a full catholic cathedral in Dublin including locations at Merrion Park or revoking the status of one of the Protestant Cathedrals back to a catholic practicing cathedral. However none of these have come to fruition as the ideas have not received support from stakeholders. Today it is commonly referred to as the “Pro” a symbol of compromise for the peaceful Irish nation

5. Use the Dublin walking tour map to the O’Connell Bridge

Originally called the Carlisle bridge, construction started in 1791 and took three years to complete. It was designed by James Gandon and named after Frederick Howard known as the Lord Carlisle, the 5th Earl of Carlisle. A popular, well used bridge connecting Sackville Street (now O’Connell Street) to Westmoreland and D’Olier street to the south. It was so popular that it needed to be replaced in the late 1800s. In 1880 the old bridge was demolished and it was replaced with a new bridge at a cost of 70,000 pounds.

Made of the same material as the original bridge, Granite and Portland Stone, it replaced the three semi circular arches with three semi elliptical arches. The bridge was named after Daniel O’Connell referred to as The Liberator of Ireland. What is unusual is that the bridge is actually wider than longer, it spans 45 m across the Liffey river and is about 50 m wide

In 2004 a couple of jokesters brothers installed a plaque on the bridge dedicating the bridge to Father Pat Noise. Father Pat Noise is a play on words in Latin “pater noster” meaning “our father”. Nobody noticed anything unusual in the plaque until May 2006. At that time the plaque came to the notice of the Dublin City Council and the jokesters owned up to their prank reveling the dedication to their father. This is an interesting spot in the Dublin walking tour guide and map as the plaque is still there

6. Carleton Cinema

Located opposite the Savoy Hotel, the cinema was built in 1936. It opened in 1938 and the first film was “The Awful Truth”. Over the years, it has played to packed houses for plays, films and concerts. The cinema was last operated by MGM and eventually closed in October 1994. The plan has been put forth to redevelop the area around the Carlton cinema with the façade of the cinema restored. It will be used as retail space and many of the buildings around the cinema will be refurbished respecting its original fabric

7. Father Theobald Mathew statue

The only statue at that time to be sculpted by a woman, Mary Redmond, it is located on, O’Connell Street and it was erected in 1892. Father Mathew, the Apostle of Temperance”, he was born in 1790 near Cashel, County Kilkenny. He was ordained as a priest to the Capuchin Order in 1814. Serving most of his life in Cork he was known for leading the temperance movement (anti-drinking) establishing Temperance Societies in every parish in the country

8. Spire of Dublin

Dublin is known for nicknaming its statues and monuments. Nickname for the Spire is Stuffy at the Liffey or Stiletto in the Ghetto. This is a popular attraction in the Dublin walking tour guide and map

A 120 m Spire erected in 2002 to replace the Nelson’s Pillar, which stood on this site for 150 years. Nelson’s pillar was a landmark and considered the center of the city. The IRA destroyed it in 1966. The base of the spire is 3ms wide and it tapers to a tip, which has a 15 cm point. It is designed so that it will sway with the high winds and there are tiny holes that allow light to pass through. The tiny holes illuminate the Spire at night. There is a feature at the tip of the Spire providing a beacon in the night sky over the capital

9. James Joyce statue 

Nickname Prick with the Stick

The James Joyce statue is just off of O’Connell street on North Earl Street near the Dublin Spire. It was sculpted by US sculptor Marjorie Fitzgibbon and erected in 1990. James Joyce was an influential poet and writer who lived most of his life abroad yet wrote of his home country. His characters resembled his family, enemies and his friends. His famous books include The Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Finnegan’s Wake and Ulysses, which was acclaimed as the “Book of the Century” (20 th Century)

10. General Post Office (GPO)

The next stop in the Dublin walking tour guide and map is the a historic landmark, the GPO. It is a Georgian style public building built in 1814 at a cost of about £80,000, it is one of Irelands famous buildings. It was used a the headquarters of the rebels in the Easter Uprising of 1916. It was on the steps of the General Post Office that Patrick Pearse, one of the leaders of the uprising, read out the “ Proclamation of the Irish Republic ” or “Easter Proclamation”, on April 24, 1916 which proclaimed Irelands independence from Britain

The copies were printed in secret and distributed; only 30 original copies remain today. The proclamation was signed by seven signators, who were later executed for treason. The Easter proclamation is a revered Irish document and a copy is on display in the main foyer of the General Post Office

A ceremony commemorating the Easter Uprising is celebrated each year where the Easter Proclamation is read outside the GPO by an officer of the Irish Defense Forces

A museum in the basement of the General Post Office, the GPO Witness History , is dedicated to the Easter Uprising, tickets can be purchased online HERE  

 11.  James Larkin statue is the next stop on the Dublin walking tour map

An Irish trade union leader, James Larkin was also a social activist. He founded the Irish Transport & General Workers Union to support unskilled workers living in deplorable conditions. He is best known for the most bitter labour dispute of 1914 referred to as the Dublin Lockout. He lost the dispute however, he did succeed in mobilizing a large labour force that was successful in other disputes. His most famous saying was “ The great appear great because we are on our knees: Let us rise”

12.  William Smith O’Brian (Irish name: Liam Mac Gabhann O’Brien) statue

Our next stop on the Dublin walking tour map is the statute of historical, though not as well known, figure that influenced Ireland’s history. The statues and dedication to William Smith O’Brien. He was the leader of the Young Ireland movement and the second son of Sir Edward O’Brien, 4th Baronet of Dromoland Castle, in Co. Claire. William received an upper class education and studied law in Dublin and in London.

Just as influential as Daniel O’Connell, he was not as popular due to the mistrust stemming from his British accent. He led an unsuccessful rebellion at Ballingarry, County Tipperary against the British rule in 1848. He was convicted of high treason and sentenced to death by being hanged, drawn and quartered. Petitions of clemency resulted in his sentence being commuted to deportation and he spent five years in Tasmania/Van Diemen’s Land (present day Australia). He was eventually pardoned and returned to Ireland but he was never active in politics after that. The statue was sculpted by Thomas Farrell in 1870 out of Sicilian Marble

13. Daniel O’Connell Monument

Continue Dublin walking tour and use the map to this popular monument. the use of the Daniel O’Connell, born on county Kerry, he was an elected Irish political leader from County Clare, who could not take his seat in the British Parliament due to restrictions placed upon Roman Catholics. A lawyer by profession, he peacefully campaigned for catholic relief also called catholic emancipation within the British Parliamentary System. This was the removal of restrictions placed on Catholics by the Uniformity Act, the Test Acts, and the Penal Laws

The statue on O’Connell Street was unveiled on August 15, 1882 and was sculpted by John Foley. Foley died before it was completed and his assistant finished it off. The statue is known as one of families greatest and finest piece of work. The statue is in three parts; the base, the drum, above the base representing his triumphs and his statue at the top. At the base of the monument are four winged figures each representing a virtue attributed to O’Connell . These are patriotism, eloquence, fidelity and courage

On the drum, above the base, are statues representing labour and triumph. One of these is a statue of “Maid of Erin” standing on top of broken Shackle’s attesting to O’Connells being personified as a liberator. The monument is topped by a statue Daniel O’Connell pointing towards the parliament building. There are about 30 bullet holes in the monument including two to his right temple, one on the arm of Maid of Erin, one on the statue of Courage.  These bullet holes were not filled in  during restoration work on the monument, see if you can spot them all. The bullet holes were a result of the 1916 Easter Week Rising. At his feet lie a pile of books which symbolize the fight of an educated man who used his knowledge to free his people from oppressive laws and acts.

As per his wishes, upon his death his body was buried beneath a Round Tower at Dublin Glasnevin Cemetary and his heart was buried in Rome at the Saint Agatha dei Goti (known at the time as the Irish college)

14. The Famine Memorial

The next stop on the Dublin walking tour map and guide is a poignant reminder to Ireland’s past. The memorial is dedicated to those families forced to leave Ireland in the 19 th century due to the Irish Famine . The first ship called “Perseverance” sailed on St Patricks Day in 1846 from Customs House Quay in Dublin (close to the Famine Memorial)

Directions : From The Famine Memorial, walk back towards Ha’penny Bridge

15. Two Irish Ladies statue found on the Dublin walking tour map

Nickname hags with bags

The statue is located near Ha’penny Bridge on Liffey Street Lower outside of The Woollen Mills restaurant. It is a Statue of two women sitting on a bench in conversation with their shopping bags at their feet

16. Ha’penny Bridge

There is a lot of history for this attraction on the Dublin walking tour map. Before the ha’penny bridge was built, the only way to get across the river was by ferry, by boat or sharing the road with horse drawn carriages. William Walsh, a city alderman, operated a fleet of ferries for people to cross the Liffey. The ferries were old and leaky. He was given a choice by the City to either build a bridge or fix his boats. If he built a bridge, he could recoup the costs by charging a toll for 100 years and was compensated an addition £3000.

The bridge was built in May 1816, and spanned 43 meters across the Liffey river. It was 3 meters wide and built 3 meters above the river. The bridge was the only pedestrian bridge that crossed the River Liffey until the millennium bridge which opened in 1999

The Ha’penny Bridge gets its name from the toll paid to cross the bridge. The toll was discontinued in 1922; however it is till commonly referred to as the Ha’penny Bridge (pronounce HAYP-nee). Over the years, it has been known as the Metal Bridge, the Liffey, the Triangle or Iron Bridge and the Wellington Bridge. When it opened, it allowed about 450 people to cross the bridge daily, today about 30,000 people cross the bridge every day

17. National Leprechaun Museum

A fun and unique stop on the Dublin walking tour map. The Leprechauns are depicted as little green men with pots of gold; however, Irish mythology shows them as little brown men who were cobblers for fairies. The museum which opened in 2010, displays a historical chronology of the how the Leprechaun image has changed in the media over the decades

What will you see at the Leprechaun Museum ?

  • A wooden replica of Giants Causeway
  • A giant size room full of furniture so you are made to feel like a leprechaun
  • Optical Illusions
  • An illuminated map with an audio of the legends of the leprechaun
  • A very funny tour guide with incredible knowledge of leprechauns

After the Dublin walking tour use the map to find Mulligans Pub – This might be a good time and location

18.  mulligans pub 1854.

Opened in 1782, they moved the location several times and its final resting place is in this location, Poolbeg Street, since 1854 when. John Mulligan sold the pub to Mick Smyth in 1932. It has stayed in the Smythe family ever since.  It has been mentioned in a James Joyce’s novel, has when been used as a filming location, entertained celebrities, media giants, the press, writers, tourists and Dubliners

Over 300 year’s old, caught in a time warp, it still has some of the original letters on the window and doors and is one of the oldest establishments in Dublin

Additional Ireland Attraction Guides:

  • Getting around Ireland – Using Public Transportation in Ireland
  • Cliffs of Moher – A very popular tour, a complete guide to the 16 attractions along the Cliffs of Moher Coastal Walk
  • Doolin – A quaint popular village in County Clare. Stop overnight and walk to the Cliffs of Moher from Doolin or enjoy the many other attractions in and around Doolin
  • The Ring of Kerry – A spectacular 111 mile scenic route on the Iveragh Peninsula. Start at either Kenmare or Killarney for a circular route of three hours without stops. Jaw dropping views of the Atlantic ocean, charming villages and wild sweeping mountains makes this a popular must see attraction in Ireland. Use the map and attractions for the complete self guided tour of the Ring of Kerry
  • The Dingle Peninsula – It is a 30 mile long clockwise loop that takes about 4 hours to complete. The area is the bedrock of Irish culture with signs in many villages and towns indicating that Irish is the predominant language in the area. The picturesque landscape includes rolling hills, craggy shorelines and sandy beaches. The PDF map and attractions guide explores the attractions of the Dingle Peninsula
  • The Ring of Beara – An 85 mile circular route, similar to Ring of Kerry and Dingle Peninsula, however it is far less travelled. In that sense, it is a better drive as there are far less cars on the road. I found the Ring of Beara far more dramatic than either the Ring of Kerry or the Dingle Peninsula. It is not as popular because the tourist buses are not able to navigate the narrow roads with hairpin bends or the Healey Pass.
  • Dublin Walk 1  – Top 18 Attractions, guide to  Dublin City Center , North of the River Liffey Dublin
  • The Book of Kells and Trinity College in Dublin. Trinity College is the oldest university in Ireland with the historic Long Room,and the old library with over 200,000 of the very old books. It is the most impressive library in the world
  • In Dublin visit the Little Museum of Dublin, Grafton Street, St Stephens Green and Kilmainham Goal (the prison where many rebels from the Easter Rising were held before their execution)
  • Dublin Walk 3  – Top 16 attractions, guide to  Historic Old Dublin
  • Galway – Use the Galway Ireland guide for a flexible and personal tour of over 40 attractions Galway City
  • Aran Islands – For a truly authentic Irish experience visit the Aran Islands. They are located at the mouth of Galway Bay. You can catch a ferry from either Doolin or Rosseeval port (Shuttle from Galway to Rosseeval ferry port)
  • The Glens of Antrim – Driving route for the nine Glens of Antrim in Northern Ireland. The guide includes options for public transportation, walking trails in The Glens and Game of Thrones Attractions
  • Over 100 Northern Ireland Attractions – Visit over 100 attractions along the east and north coast of Ireland along the Antrim and Causeway Coastal Route. Travel by car or public transport from the Mourne Mountains to Londonderry. Includes game of thrones sites, castles and walks along the route
  • The Burren – Explore the karst moonscape bedrock of The Burren located in the southwest region and close to the Cliffs of Moher. Attractions in the Burren include ancient tombs, underground caves, walks on an unusual landscape and The Burren National Park

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' class=

Here's what I have in mind (this will be in May) starting at 10am if that slot is available at the gaol:

Kilmainham Gaol (if we can get tickets, looks impossible to book)

(can stop along the way back at Guinness, maybe)

Christchurch Cathedral

Saint Patrick's Cathedral

Grafton Street or Dame Street for lunch

National archaeology museum

St Stephens Green park to relax, maybe a pub or just wander

Iveagh Gardens

We are then leaving Dublin for a self-guided walking tour. At the end of our adventures, we'll be back in Dublin for a few days. I'm thinking one additional day of touring around the city and then maybe take a 1-day guided tour of an outlying area like Wicklough. Here's my 2nd Dublin city day proposal, after doing all the above in the first go:

Trinity College/Book of Kells Exhibit (if open?)

Dublin Castle tour

Chester Beatty Library (actually a bookstore?)

Brazen Head Pub for lunch

Jameson Distillery (Fresh market near here)

Then for the afternoon... some of the following (not all):

The Little Museum of Dublin

National Library of Ireland

Marsh’s Library

Guided walking tour

Custom House Visitor Centre

Jeanie Johnston Tallship

Far north area of Dublin:

Glasnevin Cemetery Museum

Gravedigger’s Pub

National Botanic Gardens of Ireland

14 Henrietta Street

We'll narrow those down but feedback is helpful. If something is highly overrated, that's helpful to know. We aren't kiss-the-stone kind of people really. I don't need to check something off; I want to have an interesting experience. My son is currently at UCD so he may guide us to something completely different too! I'm a librarian, so interested in libraries and books generally; my list probably reflects that.

Many thanks to you locals and regular visitors who chime in! It's really helpful to get beyond the glossy websites.

4 replies to this topic

self guided tour in dublin

The Botanic Gardens and Glasnevin Cemetery can be combined - there is a pedestrian gate between the two.

Take the 40 or 140 bus to the cemetery, then the 83 bus from the Botanic Gardens (or vice versa).

This post has been removed at the author's request.

' class=

I would recommend you to take a guide with you, I 've heard that there are many undiscovered exciting places that you can visit. Or You can also make a local friend over there, people are generally nice and supportive over there, they will surely help you out.

' class=

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self guided tour in dublin

Ireland Self Drive Tours

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Quality self drive tours with excellent service & backup

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  • We tailor our self drive tours to suit your individual travel requirements, tastes and preferences.
  • Each of our vacation packages come with a personal travel advisor and backup service
  • We provide a number of specialist driving tours to cater for all your vacation tastes, such as the Gourmet Tour of Ireland, the 3 Centre Tour of Ireland and the Irish Pub & Folk Tour
  • All of our self drive tours are specifically designed to deliver an authentic and rich experience of Ireland.

How to select the right driving tour for your vacation

Begin your tour selection by choosing a duration and interests that suit your requirements.

When you find a tour that interests you, simply send us an enquiry and we will contact you to begin the process of tailoring your dream vacation.

If you do not have time to browse our driving tours you can contact us directly using the details provided at the bottom of this page, and we will help you to select a driving tour that meets your exact requirements.

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87 tours met your criteria

self guided tour in dublin

We know that thinking of perfect gift ideas for loved ones can be a chore so why not take the stress out of gift buying with an Irish Tourism gift voucher. An Irish Tourism Gift Voucher is the ideal way for friends and family to join together to give the gift of an unforgettable vacation in Ireland. Our gift vouchers can be purchased up to any amount, they can be used for 3 years from the date of issue and can be used against any Irish Tourism service including self-drive tours, escorted tours, private group tours and tailor made vacations. Please use the form below to send us a gift voucher request, please make sure to include your own contact details so that our sales representatives can contact you for all the necessary information.

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Stay in some of our finest Irish Castles and Manor Hotels including Ballynahinch Castle, an oasis of calm and luxury in Connemara in Ireland's Wild West!

10 Night Irish Castles and Manors Silver Tour

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Stay in some of our finest Irish Castles and Manor Hotels on this 9 day vacation to Ireland complete with ferry trip to Inishmore, the largest of the three Aran Islands.

8 Night Irish Castles and Manors Silver Tour

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Stay in some of our finest Irish Castles and Manor Hotels , a highlight will be the complimentary guided tour of the 15th Century Castle ruins beside Ballinalacken House by the owner

Irish Castles and Manors Silver 7 Night Tour

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Highlights of the Irish Castles and Manors Gold tour will be attending the Dunguaire Castle Banquet in Kinvara, the Smithwick’s Brewery Experience Tour in Kilkenny, the Megalithic Tombs at Newgrange and much more.

10 Night Irish Castles and Manors Gold

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7 Night Irish Castles and Manors Gold Tour

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Stay in some Ireland's Best Castles and Manor Hotels on this 9 day vacation to Ireland complete with ferry trip to the Aran Islands.

8 Night Irish Castles and Manors Gold Tour

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This tour has everything!! Stay in the most luxurious of our Irish Castles and Manor Hotels on this vacation to Ireland complete with ferry trip to the largest of the Aran Islands.

10 Night Irish Castles and Manors Platinum Tour

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Stay in some of the very best Irish Castles and Manors on this 9 day platinum vacation to Ireland complete with ferry trip to Inishmore, the largest of the Aran Islands and home to the spectacular pre-Christian Dun Aonghus Fort.

7 Night Irish Castles and Manors Platinum Tour

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Our most popular Ireland self drive tour - See Ireland’s best attractions and most scenic locations on this 10 night/11 day best of Ireland tour

Best of Ireland Tour (10 Night)

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This Best of Ireland Tour, our most popular tour, can be accessed using any of the Irish Airports and is a 12 night tour based on Ireland’s most famous sights.

Best of Ireland Tour (12 Night)

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This tour will leave you with a wonderful array of memories of the diverse scenery and cultural differences that they will encounter from one side of the country to the other.

Best of Ireland Tour (14 Night)

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This tour based on Ireland’s most famous sights including Trinity College and Kilmainham Gaol in Dublin, Powerscourt House and Blarney Castle, Killarney & much more!

Best of Ireland Tour (7 Night)

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See Ireland's best attractions and locations on this comprehensive 8 night best of Ireland self drive tour

Best of Ireland Tour (8 Night)

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By far our most popular Ireland vacation, the Best of Ireland tour allows you to appreciate Ireland’s best attractions and most scenic locations in the shortest amount of time.

Best of Ireland Tour 6 Nights

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Irish pubs are known throughout the world for their warm and friendly hospitality and for being the meeting place for like minded souls who find themselves in search of quality conversation, humour, music and great food!

Irish Pub & Folk Tour (12 Night)

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Irish pubs are known throughout the world for the friendliness and warmth of their hospitality and also for being the meeting place for like minded souls who find themselves in search of quality conversation, humour, music and food.

Irish Pub & Folk Tour (14 Night)

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Irish pubs are known throughout the world for the friendliness and warmth of their hospitality and also for being the meeting place for like-minded souls who find themselves in search of quality conversation, humor, music and food.

Irish Pub & Folk Tour (8 Night)

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This Irish Pub & Folk Tour will help you discover great pub locations that are famous for their great atmospheres, food, drink and of course terrific traditional Irish music.

Irish Pub and Folk Tour (6 Night)

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The Irish Pub & Folk Tour takes you to towns that offer numerous great pubs renowned for their atmosphere, food and superb traditional music.

Irish Pub and Folk Tour (7 Night)

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Discover ireland’s best pub locations on this 10 night Ireland self drive tour. Pubs are well-known for their great atmospheres, food, drink and great music.

Irish Pubs & Folklore 10 Nights

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This tour is a seven night tour based on Ireland’s most famous sights including Trinity College and Kilmainham Gaol in Dublin, Blarney Castle in Cork, Killarney and the Dingle Peninsula in Kerry, the Cliffs of Moher and the ‘Burren Landscape’ as well as the Aran Islands.

Best of Ireland Self Drive Tour & the Rock of Cashel (7 Night)

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Your 10 Night Luxury Irish Castles & Hotels Self Drive Tour includes the best that Ireland has to offer in terms of service, location and gastronomy. Tasting menus are also available upon request.

Luxury Irish Castles & Hotels Tour (10 Night)

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This luxury tour of Ireland includes overnights in Ireland's premier five star hotels and Castles allowing you to spend your dream Ireland vacation relaxing like a true king or queen.

Luxury Irish Castles & Hotels Tour (12 Night)

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With our Luxury Ireland Vacations you don’t just get to visit many of Ireland’s history laden Castle’s. You stay in some of Ireland’s most prestigious five star castle’s and luxury hotels.

Luxury Irish Castles & Hotels Tour (6 Night)

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This luxury tour of Ireland includes overnights in Ireland's premier five star Hotels and Castles allowing you to spend your dream Ireland vacation relaxing like a true king or queen.

Luxury Irish Castles & Hotels Tour (7 night)

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Luxury Irish Castles & Hotels Tour (8 Night)

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You will have plenty of time to discover the true romance that Ireland has to offer honeymoon couples! Spend time in city of Galway, Kerry, Cork and Clare.

Irish Romance with luxury Irish Castle Stay 10 Night Tour

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Discover why Ireland is the best honeymoon location on this Romantic 12 Night Tour of Ireland. Spend time in Connemara and vibrant Galway City, Kerry & the luxurious Dromoland Castle.

Irish Romance with luxury Irish Castle Stay 12 Night Tour

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This tour will give you ample time to discover our most romantic spots including gorgeous Galway, Cork City & Beyond, Waterford, Clare and the super luxurious Dromoland Castle.

Irish Romance with luxury Irish Castle Stay 14 Night Tour

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This 6 night honeymoon tour of Ireland includes a romantic getaway in the super luxurious Dromoland Castle and five other magnificent days to tour Ireland.

Irish Romance with luxury Irish Castle Stay 6 Night Tour

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This 7 night romantic getaway will allow you to explore Galway, Kerry and Clare and it includes an overnight stay in luxury Dromoland Castle.

Irish Romance with luxury Irish Castle Stay 7 Night Tour

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Explore Galway, Cork, Kerry and Clare on this wonderful 8 Night Romantic Tour of Ireland. Spend your final day in the lap of luxury at Romantic Dromoland Castle.

Irish Romance with luxury Irish Castle Stay 8 Night Tour

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This 5-Star Ireland honeymoon package includes the Shelbourne Hotel in Dublin, the Cliff House Hotel in Waterford, The Park Hotel in Kenmare, Dromoland Castle and Ashford Castle

Five Star Deluxe Ireland Honeymoon 10 Night Tour

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12 Nights in Ireland gives you plenty of time to discover Ireland’s greatest treasures from the Ring of Kerry in the South to Connemara in the West. Stay in the best 5-star hotels as you travel.

Five Star Deluxe Ireland Honeymoon 12 Night Tour

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On this 5-Star studded tour you will stay in some of the best hotels in Ireland including the Merrion Hotel in Dublin, The Park Hotel in Kenmare, Dromoland Castle, Ashford Castle and more!

Five Star Deluxe Ireland Honeymoon 14 Night Tour

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Discover Dublin, Waterford, Kerry and Clare on this 5-Star Deluxe Ireland Honeymoon. On this tour you will stay in some of the best hotels in Ireland.

Five Star Deluxe Ireland Honeymoon 6 Night Tour

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On this luxury honeymoon tour of Ireland you will stay in some of our finest hotels including the Shelbourne Hotel In Dublin and the Cliff House Hotel in Waterford, the Park Hotel in Kenmare and Dromoland Castle

Five Star Deluxe Ireland Honeymoon 7 Night Tour

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8 nights gives you plenty of time to explore the areas of Dublin, Waterford, Clare and Connemara. In each location you will be staying in some of the finest 5-Star hotels in Ireland.

Five Star Deluxe Ireland Honeymoon 8 Night Tour

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10 nights in Ireland gives you great scope for exploring Ireland’s best honeymoon locations on this affordable but unforgettable Irish honeymoon!

Irish Romance 10 Night Tour

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This affordable honeymoon tour of Ireland gives you the opportunity to explore Ireland’s most romantic sites from Kylemore Abbey to Blarney Castle in Cork and much more.

Irish Romance 12 Night Tour

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Discover romantic Ireland on this 14 night affordable honeymoon tour. Explore Galway with its outstandingly beautiful Connemara area and Kerry including Ring of Kerry.

Irish Romance 14 Night Tour

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Discover Kerry, Clare and Galway on this Romantic yet affordable Ireland honeymoon package. Includes a romantic cruise on the lakes of Killarney and a horse and carriage journey through Killarney National Park and much more!

Irish Romance 6 Night Tour

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Start 7 Night Irish Romance Tour in Ireland’s largest county, Cork. Famous for Blarney Castle where the stone of eloquence is said to grant the gift of the gab to those that kiss it!

Irish Romance 7 Night Tour

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Discover the romance in Cork, Kerry, Galway and Clare on this affordable honeymoon tour of Ireland. Discover the remote Dingle Peninsula, the romantic Connemara region and the stunning Cliffs of Moher and much more

Irish Romance 8 Night Tour

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Immerse yourself in one of the top driving routes in the world - The Wild Atlantic Way and discover the Wild Magnificent Ireland of your dreams!

Best of the Wild Atlantic Way (10 Night)

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This Best of the Wild Atlantic Way Driving Tour is accessed through Shannon airport and is a 12 night tour based on the highlights of the spectacular coastal route that is the Wild Atlantic Way.

Best of the Wild Atlantic Way (12 Night)

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This Best of the Wild Atlantic Way Tour is accessed through Shannon airport and is a comprehensive 14 night tour based on the highlights of the spectacular coastal route that is the Wild Atlantic Way.

Best of the Wild Atlantic Way (14 Night)

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This Best of the Wild Atlantic Way Tour is is a 7 night self drive tour based on the highlights of the spectacular coastal route that is the Wild Atlantic Way.

Best of the Wild Atlantic Way (7 Night)

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This 10 night tour features one of Ireland's best kept secrets, our northern territories, taking in Belfast, Causeway Coast, Derry/ Londonderry and Donegal & much more.

Northern Territories 10 Nights

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A 7 night tour based on Ireland's best kept secret, our very own Northern Territories. Stay in Sligo, Donegal, the North Antrim Coast and Belfast in Northern Ireland.

Northern Territories Tour (7 Night)

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Discover Northern Ireland's greatest treasures on our Northern Territories 8 night tour.

Northern Territories Tour (8 Night)

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This comprehensive All-Ireland tour can be accessed via any of the Irish Airports and encompasses all regions of the country, including Northern Ireland.

All Ireland Tour (12 Night)

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This tour does entail quite a bit of driving but it will leave the traveller with a wonderful array of memories of the diverse scenery and cultural differences that they will encounter from one end of the country to the other.

All Ireland Tour (14 Night)

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9 days - 8 nights Self Drive Vacation & Tour in Ireland This 3 Centre Tour is perfect for the traveler who prefers to explore the countryside from a number of bases rather than switch accommodations every night or two.

3 Centre Tour of Ireland (8 Night)

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Ireland’s South West region offers its visitors a great diversity of scenery, culture and plenty of leisure activities to enjoy. This rugged and mountainous terrain is steeped in ancient history and folklore!

Scenic South West Ireland Tour (6 Night)

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This popular driving tour of the picturesque counties of Cork and Kerry, including the towns of Kinsale, Killarney and Dingle has the perfect mix of sightseeing and welcoming pubs, restaurants & hotels.

Scenic South West Ireland Tour (7 Night)

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This 5 Centre Tour is perfect for the traveller who prefers to explore the countryside from a number of bases rather than switch accommodations every night or two.

5 Centre Tour of Ireland 14 Nights

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The 4 Centre Tour is ideal for the traveller that wishes to see the best parts of Ireland, but would prefer not to be in different accommodation every night.

4 Centre Tour of Ireland 12 Nights

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The 3 Centre Tour is ideal for the traveller that wishes to see the best parts of Ireland, but would prefer not to be in different accommodation every night.

3 Centre Tour of Ireland (10 Night)

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This tour includes time in some of the most historical and picturesque areas of the southern half of the country.

Southern Tour (12 Night)

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This easy-going and relaxing tour includes time in some of the most historical and picturesque areas of the southern half of Ireland

Southern Tour (14 Night)

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This driving tour package includes time in some of the most historical and picturesque areas of the southern half of the country.

Southern Tour 10 Night

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Explore Ireland with us on this family vacation which includes a combination of our favourite family hotels and an unforgettable overnight family stay in the 5* Dromoland Castle

Ireland with Kids – 5 Star Castle Adventure

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This package includes seven nights’ in Adare’s most family friendly hotel and on booking your package with us you will receive a comprehensive tour pack which will include several day tours that you may choose to take from this historic location. .

Ireland with Kids - Adare

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Ballycotton Bay in East Cork is your base location for this Ireland Family Vacation. With a rich maritime and historical heritage, East Cork has a unique variety of attractions to offer the discerning family.

Ireland with Kids - Ballycotton 7 Nights

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For this Irish Tourism family vacation we have chosen Dingle as your base location. The Dingle Peninsula offers some of Ireland’s most stunning scenery from the towering Brandon Mountains to the spectacular seascapes of Dingle Bay.

Ireland with Kids - Dingle 7 Nights

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Kilkenny is famous for its medieval building and castle. The atmosphere and character of this unique city makes it a great base for touring Ireland with kids.

Ireland with Kids - Kilkenny

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As well as cosmopolitan Dublin City and traditional Irish music loving Galway City, this tour includes the renowned Cork Film Festival which runs from 09-17th of November.

6 Night Ireland’s Cities Vacation Including Cork Film Festival

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Get away from it all to the unspoilt West of Ireland and explore rugged Connemara, Galway City, Cliffs of Moher, Westport & much more!

Way out West Tour (7 Night)

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Get away from it all to the unspoilt West of Ireland. By day enjoy the magnificent scenery including, The Cliffs of Moher, The Aran Islands, Killary Harbour and the stark Burren Landscape of County Clare.

Way out West Tour (8 Night)

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Spend 10 nights exploring Ireland while staying in the comfort of some of our best 4-star hotels. Highlights include the stunning Waterford Castle and Greagan's Castle Hotel.

Irish Delight Luxury Getaway 10 Night Tour

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Spend time in the cosmopolitan city of Dublin, Romantic Waterford, Historic Cork, Beautiful Kerry, Clare, Connemara and the Garden of Ireland, Wicklow. Stay in beautiful 4-star hotels and castles.

Irish Delight Luxury Getaway 12 Night Tour

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Ireland will give you a great opportunity to see all aspects of our culture and history. Spend time in the city of Dublin, Waterford, Cork, Kerry, Clare, Galway.

Irish Delight Luxury Getaway 14 Night Tour

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Experience some great 4* luxury hotels on this honeymoon tour of Ireland. Package includes Dublin and scenic Kerry as well as an overnight stay at Waterford Castle.

Irish Delight Luxury Getaway 6 Night Tour

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This honeymoon tour of Ireland will help you experience some great 4* luxury hotel. Package includes Dublin and scenic Kerry as well as an overnight stay at Waterford Castle and Gregan's Castle in Clare.

Irish Delight Luxury Getaway 7 Night Tour

self guided tour in dublin

Discover Dublin, Waterford, Kerry and Clare on this honeymoon tour of Ireland. The accommodations we have chosen for this tour are all four star luxury and you will stay at the authentic Waterford Castle.

Irish Delight Luxury Getaway 8 Night Tour

self guided tour in dublin

Our Irish Welcome tour will give you a taste of both traditional community life and the spectacular natural scenery that it nestles in.

10 Night Irish Welcome Tour

self guided tour in dublin

See locations associated with Ireland's contribution to world literature. Many world famous writers, poets and playwrights were born and lived here and were inspired to write about the spectacular beauty, culture and history of their native isle.

Literary Tour of Ireland (8 Night)

self guided tour in dublin

Join us in Dublin for St. Patrick's Day and immerse yourself in the vibrant atmosphere of Dublin’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, feel the energy, enjoy the sights and sounds and marvel at the spectacular performance of the parade participants. .

St. Patrick’s Day Festival Tour

self guided tour in dublin

Get involved and celebrate being Irish with the Gathering Ireland. Ireland will open its arms to the many millions of friends, family, loved ones and connections overseas, inviting them home to celebrate.

The Gathering Ireland Tour (8 Night)

self guided tour in dublin

Discover Viking Ireland for yourself on this six night tour of Ireland.

6 Night Viking Tour of Ireland

self guided tour in dublin

Discover how the Vikings influenced the development of the modern Ireland that we know today.

7 Night Viking Tour of Ireland

self guided tour in dublin

This 8 night/9 day tour of Ireland will take you through Ireland’s Viking heritage beginning in the city of Dublin where our Viking history can easily be seen.

8 Night Viking Tour of Ireland

self guided tour in dublin

The counties of Cork & Kerry, including the towns of Kinsale, Killarney and Dingle lay claim to some of the most varied and spectacular scenery in the country.

Scenic South West Ireland Tour (8 Night)

self guided tour in dublin

If so, Go-As-You-Please Ireland B&B Vouchers are for you. The ideal alternative for the independent traveller, Go-As-You-Please Ireland B&B Vouchers provide total flexibility.

Bed and Breakfast Vouchers Ireland

self guided tour in dublin

Nothing captures the romance, architecture and history like the castles of Ireland do.

Luxury Irish Castles & Hotels Tour (14 Night)

self guided tour in dublin

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self guided tour in dublin

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self guided tour in dublin

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self guided tour in dublin

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Self Guided Trinity Trails

Book your self-guided tour.

The Trinity Trails self-guided tour takes you through 14 points of interest across the campus, interwoven with engaging augmented reality elements and compelling audio from subject matter experts.

The self-guided tour costs €5 and you can take it anytime at your own pace. The tour gives you exclusive access to an extensive audio guide featuring Trinity students and academics.

To access your tour, firstly download the FREE Visit Trinity app, which is available from all app stores and book your ticket to unlock the audio guide content here:

visitor on self guided tour around trinity college

Self Guided Trinity Trails Highlights

tourists on self guided tour of trinity with earphones

Ticket FAQs

Answers to your questions.

Do I have to book tickets online?

The self-guided tour costs €5 and it needs to be purchased online via the Book Now button.

What are your opening hours

You can take your self-guided tour at any time of the day. However, we recommend taking the tour during daylight hours.

Is the self-guided tour wheelchair accessible?

Our guided walking tours follow accessible walkways across Trinity campus. Please be advised that from time to time, there may be an area that is not entirely suitable, in which case there will simply be a slight delay on route.

If you would like further info please email us at: [email protected]

Are there toilet facilities on campus?

Yes, campus has accessible toilets for visitors:

Monday – Friday: The Arts Block (beside the Perch Café)

Saturday – Sunday: The Berkeley Library (inside the front door on the left)

I am a Tour Guide. Can I guide groups through Trinity campus?

Tours of the campus can only be conducted through Visit Trinity’s official tour guides and authorized staff members. For further information email: [email protected]

Does the self-guided tour include access to any buildings?

The self-guided tour is a fully external tour of Trinity campus, with content accessed via the Visit Trinity App.

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Guided Garden Tours

self guided tour in dublin

Thursday, 23 May 2024 - Thursday, 29 August 2024

Event times :

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About this event

On this guided walking tour expect to see rare and beautiful plants and exotic butterflies in Ireland’s only Butterfly House, not forgetting The Cambridge House a Greenhouse that plays an integral role for Lord Milo’s horticultural studies. The Pond which is the most meditative part of the walled garden is also home to spectacularly colourful botanical flowers from places like South America.

You will see the Rose Garden which was Isobel Talbots favourite garden, old varieties of roses, magnolias and lilies and a riot of colour when in bloom. The Dutch House and The Peach House – the oldest greenhouses in the garden holding rare plants – the former housing Mediterranean plants like pink peony and the later given over to Australasian shrubs.

self guided tour in dublin

Thu, 13 Jun - Sun, 16 Jun

self guided tour in dublin

Wed, 26 Jun

Chester Beatty

self guided tour in dublin

Wed, 19 Jun

self guided tour in dublin

Wed, 12 Jun

self guided tour in dublin

Wed, 29 May

self guided tour in dublin

Thu, 30 May - Mon, 3 Jun

Phoenix Park

self guided tour in dublin

Fri, 31 May

Pavilion Theatre

self guided tour in dublin

Fri, 21 Jun - Sun, 23 Jun

The Dot Theatre

self guided tour in dublin

Fri, 31 May - Sun, 2 Jun

Richmond Barracks

self guided tour in dublin

EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum

self guided tour in dublin

Thu, 13 Jun

Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre

self guided tour in dublin

Sun, 16 Jun

IMAGES

  1. A Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin

    self guided tour in dublin

  2. Free & Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour, Ireland, Europe. Highlights of

    self guided tour in dublin

  3. Dublin Walking Tour: A Self-Guided Walk To Dublin, Ireland Sights

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  4. Dublin Self Guided Audio Tour

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  5. Follow these expert designed self-guided walking tours to explore

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  6. 15 Sights in One Day

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COMMENTS

  1. Best Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin (With Map)

    7. The Custom House. Photos via Shutterstock. The next stop on our self-guided walking tour of Dublin is the magnificent Custom House, a 4-minute walk from Mulligan's. This is an architectural marvel on Dublin's waterfront and it was designed by James Gandon in the late 18th century.

  2. 15 Sights in One Day

    G. Saint Patrick's Cathedral. Located 5-10 minutes down St Patrick's Street, Saint Patrick's is Dublin's second cathedral. Jonathan Swift, best known as the author of Gulliver's Travels, is buried under its floor. He was Dean of the Cathedral from 1713 to 1745. Tickets must be purchased to enter the edifice.

  3. Epic Dublin Self Guided Walking Tour

    Several attractions from Dublin Self Guided Walking tour located in Merrion Square . It is an attractive park on the south side of Dublin that retains its Georgian character. Surrounded on three sides by red brick Georgian town houses and closed off by the Duke of Leinster's palace, Leinster House that is Ireland's Parliament is located ...

  4. Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin

    This post is a self-guided tour of Dublin that covers all the iconic sites on the city's south bank as well as some lesser-known haunts.. The tour should take approximately 1.5 hours or just a bit less than that. The walk is approximately 1.5 km (just over 1/2 a mile).

  5. Dublin Walking Tour: A Self-Guided Walk To Dublin, Ireland Sights

    Free Walking Tour Dublin, Ireland. Our free walking tour of Dublin is a self-guided adventure to top attractions. The walk focuses on downtown Dublin and is an easy, flat stroll through the city center. Our Dublin sightseeing tour, without any stops, should take about 2 hours at a casual pace.

  6. One Day in Dublin: A Relaxed Self-Guided Tour (A Local's Guide)

    Or, you could base yourself in Dublin and visit some of Ireland's top attractions on Dublin Day Trips. Below are some of my favourites: The Cliffs of Moher is Ireland's leading tourist attraction. It is possible to visit the famous cliffs on a short day trip from Dublin. The drive takes 3 and a half hours in Total.

  7. A Self-Guided Walking Tour of Dublin

    A walking tour of Dublin, self-guided, does it need a lot of preparation and map-work? Actually, it does not, as Ireland's capital is ideal for a leisurely stroll that will take in most of the top attractions too. Most of the best sights of Dublin are situated in a comparatively small area. To get a good impression of this lively and historic ...

  8. Dublin: City Highlights Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Dublin's self-guided walking tour allows visitors to explore the city's iconic districts, providing a comprehensive and interactive experience. Here are three highlights of the tour: Discover Dublin's hidden gems: The tour takes you off the beaten path to uncover the city's lesser-known treasures. From charming side streets to tucked ...

  9. A self-guided walking tour of Dublin

    The highlights of Dublin: one day walking tour. This self-guided walking tour of Dublin is approximately 8km (5 miles) long and can easily be covered in a day, including visits to some of the attractions along the way. I ventured off this route many times whenever I spotted something interesting, which resulted in a total walking distance that ...

  10. Free & Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour

    The Brazen Head. The oldest pub in Dublin, and indeed all of Ireland, can be found in the form of The Brazen Head, a drinking establishment dating all the way back to 1198. Historically, the tavern has seen plenty of events over the years. After all, the pub is referenced in James Joyce's iconic work, Ulysses, and Jonathan Swift (author of ...

  11. 11 Self-Guided Walking Tours in Dublin, Ireland + Maps

    Self-Guided Walking Tours to Explore Dublin, Ireland Follow these 11 expert-designed self-guided walking tours to explore Dublin, Ireland on foot at your own pace. You can also create your own self-guided walk to visit the city attractions which interest you the most.

  12. Complete Dublin Walking Tour

    There are three separate Dublin self guided walking walking tours: Tour 1- Downtown Central Dublin located north of River Liffey, Tour 2 - Temple Bar Region, St Stephens Green and Grafton Street located south of River Liffey and Tour 3 - Historic Dublin includes Dublin Corporation, Dublin City Hall (and includes parts of the Temple Bar ...

  13. Self-Guided Dublin Walking Tour: Dublin's Top Sights

    These photos show O'Connell Street that is the main street between north and south in Dublin. There is the Old Post Office, in fact it's only the facade of it. The rest was destroyed in an uprising in 1916 that finally led to Irish independence. Dublin self-guided walking tour: the Monument of Light. This is the Spire.

  14. Dublin travel guide: Self-Guided Walking Tour / Authentic Europe

    About this Self-Guided Walking Tour in Dublin. In 3 hours, explore Dublin and discover some of the city's most famous attractions, including the Spire, Dublin Castle, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Trinity College and much more. We've carefully curated this itinerary to ensure you get the most out of your time in the city. Duration: 3 to 4 hours.

  15. Ultimate Dublin Walking Tour Map

    Dublin: Explore central Dublin on foot with these three self guided walking tours and map: Dublin Walk 1 - Top 18 Attractions, guide to Dublin City Center, North of the River Liffey Dublin. Dublin Walk 2 - Top 16 attractions, guide to attractions South of the River Liffey, including the Temple Bar Region. The Book of Kells and Trinity ...

  16. THE TOP 10 Dublin Self-guided Tours (UPDATED 2024)

    Dublin Self Guided Sherlock Holmes Murder Mystery Game. 1. Explore the city at your own pace while playing the Sherlock Holmes City Game, a self-guided tour that offers a lot of freedom and flexibility. You can play when, where and with who you want. Whether you want to play alone for personal excitement or with a group of people this is the ...

  17. Dublin: City Highlights Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Dublin: City Highlights Self-Guided Walking Tour. Activity provider:lialo.com. 3.7 / 5 3 reviews. From $13.06 per group up to 4. ... 19 Dublin Guided tours. 20 Dublin Family-friendly activities. Cities in Ireland. 1 Galway. 2 Cork. 3 Killarney. 4 City of Limerick. 5 Kilkenny. 6 Baltimore, Ireland. 7 Waterford. 8 Sligo. 9 Doolin.

  18. Dublin: Self-Guided Audio Tour in English

    Stroll the streets of Dublin at your own pace on a self-guided, English-language audio tour. Journey through more than 1,000 years of history as you discover monuments to legendary Irish figures, such as Molly Malone and Wolfe Tone.

  19. Trinity Trails

    Take a guided tour through the grounds of Trinity College Dublin and discover the hidden gems that make Ireland's oldest university such a special place. Make the most out of your day in Dublin with a Book of Kells Experience & Trinity Trails bundle. This combined ticket includes a guided campus tour followed by access to the Book of Kells ...

  20. A Self-Guided Walking Literary Tour of Dublin for Bookworm Travelers

    A Self-Guided Walking Literary Tour of Dublin for Bookworm Travelers. December 6, 2017 by Allison Green. Nerd alert: I went to Dublin for a weekend in 2009 solely to retrace the footsteps of one of my favorite authors, James Joyce. Double nerd alert: I named my (male) cat Joyce after him, thoroughly confusing everyone less geeky than myself ...

  21. Walking self tours

    We are then leaving Dublin for a self-guided walking tour. At the end of our adventures, we'll be back in Dublin for a few days. I'm thinking one additional day of touring around the city and then maybe take a 1-day guided tour of an outlying area like Wicklough. Here's my 2nd Dublin city day proposal, after doing all the above in the first go:

  22. Ireland Self Drive Tours

    Each of our vacation packages come with a personal travel advisor and backup service. We provide a number of specialist driving tours to cater for all your vacation tastes, such as the Gourmet Tour of Ireland, the 3 Centre Tour of Ireland and the Irish Pub & Folk Tour. All of our self drive tours are specifically designed to deliver an ...

  23. Self Guided Tour

    The Trinity Trails self-guided tour takes you through 14 points of interest across the campus, interwoven with engaging augmented reality elements and compelling audio from subject matter experts. The self-guided tour costs €5 and you can take it anytime at your own pace. The tour gives you exclusive access to an extensive audio guide ...

  24. Guided Garden Tours

    Guided Garden Tours; Guided Garden Tours. Thursday, 23 May 2024 - Thursday, 29 August 2024. Event times: 11:00 - 12:30. Event location: Malahide Castle & Gardens. Event price: ... Ghosts and Ghouls of Dublin | Walking Tour. Sat, 18 May. 82 Merrion Square. Visit website Opens in a new window. Festivals & events Lectures & readings . Dublin True ...