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Olympus Trip 35 – Camera Review

Josh solomon.

  • October 3, 2016

olympus trip 35 opinie

As enthralling as photography can be, long days, months, and years spent shooting can wear you out. In the worst case, it can lead to a photographic malaise that can dismantle even the most well-built minds from the inside out. It can render the best shooters incapable of even the simple task of pressing a shutter button. It’s shooter’s block, our equivalent to writer’s block, and it hit me hard over the summer.

I jumped out of bed one morning full of energy, ready to take on the world with my trusty Nikon F and Leica M2. But instead of plunging into a world filled with beauty, intrigue, and possibility, I found my surroundings cold, ugly, and indifferent. The images I tried to form seemed trite and overplayed, and I soon lost confidence in my ability to make a decent picture. Even the storied reputations of my F and M2 failed to inspire me. Every time I peered through their viewfinders I saw nothing but dust in the pentaprism and emptiness between the framelines.

Sufficiently depressed, I decided to stay home and put my cameras on the shelf. And it was while I was lying face down on a pillow listening to the opening lines of Chicago’s “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” that I realized I did, in fact, need a little time away. But I didn’t need a full-on vacation from the hobby itself – no, that would be too drastic. I just needed a change from the manual cameras that sat on my shelf. I needed an easier camera, and I had a feeling one camera in particular could fit the bill – the Olympus Trip 35.

Olympus Trip 35 003

The Olympus Trip 35 is a camera I’d heard a lot about but had never tried myself. Its reputation for ease of use and high quality seemed the perfect cure for my shooter’s block. And if the Trip 35 was the prescription, the Pasadena Camera Show was the pharmacy. There I found a beautiful Trip 35 for an absurdly low price, bought it, and quickly threw it in my bag.

One would think the Olympus Trip 35 would seem out of place next to legendary cameras like the aforementioned Nikon and Leica, but it actually fits right in. This camera, although not as capable as the other two, holds an equally lofty place in photographic history. Just as the F and the M defined the SLR and rangefinder genres respectively, the Trip 35 defined the point-and-shoot game. More impressive still, the Trip 35 actually outsold the Nikon F and the Leica M2 by millions. Take that, fanboys.

Olympus achieved these massive numbers by appealing to the casual shooter rather than pro photographers, specifically focusing on the new generation of moneyed vacationers. Racing from landmark to landmark and airport to airport, these sightseers simply lacked the time and interest needed to learn the boring particulars of photography required to operate a camera. Instead, they required a camera that was simple to use, but sophisticated enough to beautifully capture their memories.

Good design marries aesthetics to functionality, and the the camera gods couldn’t have picked a better company to bring the Trip 35 to life. Olympus’ design house, fresh off the ingenious half-frame Pen F, struck gold again with the Trip. The design is classic Olympus; clean-cut lines and an impossibly small form factor, the Trip wastes no time and gets straight to the point. It’s as well designed as any machine of its day, more impactful when we recall that the Trip came of age in an era where cameras were still fully mechanical, save for the occasional battery powered light meter. Automation seemed a distant (and expensive) fantasy, so when Olympus created a genuine auto-exposure camera out of primitive nuts and bolts, the world took notice. This was in no uncertain terms an engineering miracle.

The Trip 35 accomplishes this sorcery by determining the amount of light that enters a Selenium photo cell surrounding the lens, and choosing a correct aperture based on this reading. The camera then chooses a shutter speed of either a 1/200th or 1/40th of a second and we get a perfect exposure. When the camera’s incapable of making an acceptable exposure, a little red flag shows up in the viewfinder and the shutter locks out. The magic of this system is that it takes all exposure-related worry out of our minds. We don’t have to agonize about aperture, shutter speed, or even battery life, a godsend for vacationers and anxious photo geeks.

But before we experience it, it’s quite easy to question the Trip 35’s simplicity. After all, how accurate could a camera this old and primitive be? And could the lens be good enough for our 21st century eyes? As I drove home from the camera show, my new Trip in the passenger seat next to me, these questions rolled through my mind. I really needed this camera to be decent, if I was to pull out of my photographic death spiral.

Just then, I received a text message from my sister. Can you pick up some pork buns in chinatown? thx. With this, I had my mission; buy some pork buns, shoot the Trip, and see if this ancient camera could walk the walk.

The first thing I noticed was its build quality. Comprised of metal and plastic, the Trip 35 is solid, but never heavy; lightweight, but never flimsy. The only disappointing aspect of the camera’s feel is its film advance wheel. A dinky plastic affair reminiscent of disposable cameras, this lackluster cog is forgivable when we remember that the Trip was built to be a consumer-level camera.

Peering through the viewfinder showed bright frame-lines with tick marks both for up-close shots and for landscape shots. These are helpful in view of the Trip’s lack of automatic parallax correction. Having used fancy Leica , Nikon , and Contax rangefinders renowned for brightness and clarity, the Trip’s viewfinder beats most of them. Its relative simplicity is a nice change from the cluttered and overly complex viewfinders of other machines. The Trip 35 also features a small window in the bottom right of the VF (affectionately dubbed the “Judas Window” by Trip 35 disciples) which shows both the chosen aperture and exposure setting on the camera.

Olympus Trip 35 009

So far, so good. But how was I to determine focus? I quickly realized that the Trip’s a scale-focus camera, which is not ideal for accuracy. But before I started feeling like Olympus left me all alone and helpless, I realized that they were kind enough to provide some handy distance-measuring tools. Settings along the lens barrel show a picture of one person for portraits, two people for pictures of two people, three people for group pictures, and a mountain symbol for everything in the distance, including mountains. I stopped hyperventilating, and realized that, for a point-and-shoot camera, this is more than enough. And for all you nitpickers, Olympus also included precise distance measurements in both meters and feet on the underside of the lens. Phew.

Once shooting the Trip started to shine, and I was easily able to focus on exactly what matters most in photography – composition. From the first frame I found myself joyfully snapping away at whatever tickled my fancy, even though I didn’t know what aperture values and shutter speeds the Trip 35 was choosing. Frankly, I didn’t give a damn. All that mattered to me was finding different angles, new ways to play with light, and how to capture Chinatown’s unique charm. It felt like with each and every frame, the Trip was dissolving my shooter’s block more and more, and I wanted to just keep shooting.

So the little Olympus and I danced through Chinatown’s colorful landscape, happily snapping away. In no uncertain terms, it was the most fun I’d ever had with a camera. Even though the heat of the afternoon beat on my shoulders and the sweat sizzled on my brow, the Trip 35 and I ran through the city without a care in the world. The streets led us to the door of a steamy Chinese restaurant, then a pile of steaming pork buns, then back to the equally steamy interior of my car. I didn’t care how long the journey took or how much fluid I lost in that heatwave. It seemed like I sweated out my shooter’s block, and I eagerly raced home to deliver the buns, and develop the film.

But something was nagging me about the camera the entire way home; the focus issue. Had I gotten the focus correct for every shot? How was I to trust those markings? How could I possibly live without a focusing aid? Anxiety began to rear its head again and I had to stop myself from speeding over to a one-hour photo lab to assuage my fears. I gripped the steering wheel tight and told myself to trust the Trip. Besides, I still had a job to do. These pork buns weren’t going to deliver themselves.

After delivering and munching on said pork buns with my contented sibling, I decided to get the roll developed and scanned. My fears were partially founded. Some of the shots, especially photos of close subjects or darker scenes, came back fuzzy due to a combination of my poor distance estimation and the nature of the Trip’s exposure and focus systems. While the Trip automatically helps achieve sharp focus by selecting a smaller aperture for greater depth-of-field, this is only possible in bright light. As things get dark, the ability to shoot at a smaller aperture quickly disappears. In these situations it can be really difficult to nail correct focus. One minor consequence of this is that shooters with an affinity for portraiture and those sweet bokeh balls will probably be disappointed by this camera.

Olympus Trip 35 004

But expecting creamy bokeh and close range performance from the Trip 35 (or most point-and-shoots for that matter) is like expecting a ‘93 Honda Civic to outpace a Tesla Model S. It just won’t happen, and trying will lead to frustration. But just like that Honda, if you regard the Trip 35 as a reliable machine good for an occasional joyride, it will never disappoint. The Trip 35 is capable of a great many things , but we must be careful to recognize and respect its own limits.

When we get the focus right, the Trip’s fantastic 40mm F/2.8 Zuiko lens delivers in spades. The lens is a front-focusing Tessar type lens, which means that it’s very simple and very sharp, and it retains this sharpness edge to edge without chromatic aberration, spherical aberration, or any kind of distortion due to its simple optical formula and Olympus’s masterful execution. The lens’ quality even overcame the limitations of expired film, and ended up giving me some great results.

For whom is this camera best suited? First and foremost, the Trip 35 might just be the perfect camera for the casual photophile. Olympus built this camera to document the daily adventures of the everyman, and the Trip does this beautifully. And for experienced shooters, the Trip 35 can be a great way to break free of shooter’s block, or inject our shooting with something fun and carefree. It emphasizes the art of composition rather than the cold calculations of exposure, but even more importantly, it reminds us to relax, have a pork bun, and not take ourselves too seriously.

Want to try the Trip 35 for yourself?

Buy it on ebay, buy it on amazon, shop b&h photo’s vintage gear, follow casual photophile on facebook and instagram.

[ Some of the links in this article will direct users to our affiliates at B&H Photo , Amazon , and eBay . By purchasing anything using these links, Casual Photophile may receive a small commission at no additional charge to you. This helps Casual Photophile produce the content we produce. Many thanks for your support. ]

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  • Camera Review
  • film camera
  • olympus Trip

olympus trip 35 opinie

Josh Solomon is a freelance writer and touring bassist living in Los Angeles. He has an affinity for all things analog. When not onstage, you can find him roaming around Southern California shooting film and humming a tune.

29 comments

olympus trip 35 opinie

Very nicely done.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Great review of the Trip! This is the camera that lured me away from Lomography and the whole low-fi aesthetic. While the metering system is somewhat primitive and the zone focusing can be imprecise, especially in low light, it’s obvious that all the money and work went into the lens. In the right circumstances it’s absolutely tack sharp. Once I started getting sharp images from my Trip, the Lomo LC-A+ and the Holga started looking a lot less appealing.

The Trip definitely has some big limitations but on its own terms it’s a great camera.

Here’s my Trip album on Flickr to get an idea.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/21156896@N07/sets/72157645739914959

olympus trip 35 opinie

Thanks for adding your Flickr album. It’s great for people to be able to see what these cameras can do in varied situations.

Thanks so much! Those images are fantastic; they really showcase what that lens can do. Funny you mention the LC-A+… ?

Thanks! The LC-A+ was the camera that got me back into using film after an extended dalliance with digital photography. I used it really heavily for about 2 years before becoming curious about other cameras. The fact that the Lomo is also a zone focuser made it very easy for me to switch to the Trip and the XA2.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Great write up Josh, and really nice album Neilson! I had to do a double take on some of those shots, especially the close up portraits, realizing that you had used a Trip.

olympus trip 35 opinie

I agree, what a great review and some fine shots on that flickr gallery. I’ve just bought my 50th Olympus Trip 35 and am steadily rebuilding them from head to toe. I’ve posted some reviews and other helpful reviews on my site https://trip35.co/

olympus trip 35 opinie

Great pictures from the Trip. You got to love these little cameras!

olympus trip 35 opinie

The Trip 35 was *made* for landscapes and group photos in good light outside. It’s really dang good for those things. For everything else, not so much! But like you, on a day when I’m just out and about shooting stuff, I find the Trip 35 to be big fun.

My last outing with my Trip 35: https://blog.jimgrey.net/2015/04/20/olympus-trip-35-revisited/

If I ever get on an airplane again I think I’ll be bringing this camera… We’ll see. Josh and your post have helped convince me. Thanks for sharing.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Great review of one of my favourite cameras and one of the best free cameras I’ve ever been given. The quality you can get from this little package has always astounded me, this is an example taken with just bog standard Poundland special film (Agfa Vista 200) https://the6millionpman.wordpress.com/2016/09/30/cardiff-bay-sunset-3/

And yet again I confess to being an Olympus fanboy.

Beautiful colors and range on that.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Great article Josh, and thanks for publishing it James. There wasn’t a link, but I started the Olympus Trip 35 users group on Facebook, here is the link. P.S. A few famous photogrpaphers in the group.

http://www.facebook.com/groups/OlympusTrip35

Hey my friend! Thanks for commenting. We did include a link there, it’s in the third to last paragraph where it says the Trip is “capable…” etc.

And for anyone down here in the comments, do check out the FB group. Amazing talent there shooting with all kinds of Trips.

The Trip Flickr group is worth checking out too. Lots of good stuff there.

https://flic.kr/g/5jsssh

olympus trip 35 opinie

Great write-up! I have three of these and, while I’m by no means a great photographer, I do love the pick-up-and-go nature of the Trip 35. For those who are interested, I spent an entire day refocusing the lens on one of mine;

https://teeritz.blogspot.com.au/2014/04/re-focusing-lens-on-olympus-trip.html

Almost drove me nuts!

That post is scary. You’re a brave man.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Bought a Trip after reading a recommendation by Ken Rockwell. At the time I thought I only ever needed one camera – an FE – and I had one. However, the Trip is great for other things. As you say, the pictures are so sharp. And its so easy to use.

olympus trip 35 opinie

I love my Trip 35. Fantastically sharp lens and incredibly easy to use! The zone focusing took a bit getting used to and I do still occasionally misfocus, but when that happens I embrace my inner William Klein. Also, my copy came with a lens cap and zipped up in a bag so the selenium is not at all worn out and the AE is spot-on. I actually trust shooting slide film in this camera more than any of my all-manual cameras!

olympus trip 35 opinie

Hi! Thank you so much. I am seriously considering to buy a Trip. I want to go traveling and bring a good camera. Do you think this one will do? And some people say it’s not really for taking photo’s in the dark/on parties. Are they right?

Thanks again 🙂

Hey Nikki! The Trip is the perfect camera for travel and casual outdoor shooting IMO, but it does suffer in low light without a flash. A little compact flash will help, and it does have a manual aperture override for accurate flash exposures.

If you’re going to be spending lots of time indoors I would suggest either picking up a cheap P&S with a built in flash, or upgrading entirely to a compact SLR/fixed-lens rangefinder with a fast (f/2 and under) lens for low-light shooting without a flash. Hope this helps!

Hello Nikki, I am the Admin of the Olympus Trips 35 Users Group, I recommend you join to get advice, and there are trustworthy sellers in the group.

See the website link below my comment

olympus trip 35 opinie

I’ve recently picked up aTrip 35 and have been very pleasantly surprised by the ease of use and picture quality. I even tried some low light close shots and had better results than I expected. Tip #1: use 400 speed film to increase versatility. You get more depth of field in any situation and therefore more focussing accuracy. You will also hold off the “red flag” for a stop or two. Tip #2: learn how to guesstimate the zone distances as accurately as possible. If you’re shooting close-up in lower light try to nail the actual distance e.g. set the lens on 1 meter and try to be 1 meter away. Use a tape measure at first so you can see what the distances look like. As the light falls or distances get closer then more accuracy is required from the photographer. Tip #3: remember that you can press the shutter button half way down to lock the exposure. Meter off a mid-tone then recompose and shoot. This will help with back lighting and other tricky light. Tip #4: try to shoot within the limits of the design and you will get good results. The Trip 35 was meant for family holidays and a whimsical approach to photography. If you require critical focussing or metering the Trip was never really designed for that. Enjoy!

olympus trip 35 opinie

Hi, Josh. Great writing. I enjoyed reading your review and laughed so much at the pork bun adventure! Thanks!

olympus trip 35 opinie

Thirty-seven years of shooting film and the Trip 35 was a camera I’d always ignored for being ‘too simple’. I spotted one in a local charity shop last week that was cased, boxed and in lovely condition and I got it for next to nothing. I ran half a roll of FT-12 ASA50 cinema film through and the results were far better than I expected. I started out on Olympus all those years ago (still use them) but I’m a bit ashamed of myself for ignoring this little gem. My 8 year old is just starting to take an interest in photography and this is going to be ideal for her.

Thanks for a great review and for pointing out a couple of little features I hadn’t spotted.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Quick pedantic note: In virtually everything I’ve seen online about the Trip 35, there’s one thing that nobody ever seems to say:

The Trip 35 is essentially the full-frame version of the earlier half-frame Pen EES and EES-2.

I had an EES-2 and it was a great shooter for an inexpensive camera. It worked exactly the same way as the Trip: the selenium meter around the lens chose one of two shutter speeds or raised a red flag if there wasn’t sufficient light; it had a four-icon zone focus lens; there was one manual speed for flash along with adjustable f-stops when not in Auto. Of course, the Trip had a different focal length lens to produce a full-frame image, but I suspect it’s of a very similar design to the EES-2’s. And note that the Trip 35’s top plate includes the EES-2’s hot shoe, along with the back cover/rewind knob from the Pen series (and frame counter from the Pen F series), and the viewfinder is essentially the same as the EES-2’s.

My point is: the Trip 35’s super-successful design wasn’t actually new, the camera was scaled up from the already successful Pen EES series.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Thank you… Now I’m on my way for fun an Mindfulness 🙂 A very brilliant text who give me interests and energy. Thank you 🙂

olympus trip 35 opinie

Just bought one, trying it out tomorrow. I would suggest to buy a tripod and a self-release cord, set it to A and just set for the distance. I used to carry a 110 film camera back in 1977 and was taught photography back in 1981 from a WW2 vet. Warhol used a Pentax 35afm because he could set a high iso without flash.

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New york city and the half-frame 35mm olympus pen d, the cinematic point and shoot – minolta p’s (freedom vista) review, olympus xa2 – point and shoot 35mm film camera review.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Shoot It With Film

How to Shoot Night Photography with the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box

  • Learn to Shoot Film: Tips & Tutorials
  • January 25, 2019

Night Photography on the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box on Shoot It With Film

Written by  Tom Box

Night Photography on the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box on Shoot It With Film

I would imagine most, if not all, of the people reading this have heard of the Olympus Trip 35

Over 10,000,000 units of the camera were sold during it’s lifetime, and the solid build, simple operation, and wide availability have made the Trip a hugely popular option for the modern film crowd.

I’m not going to review the camera, as this has been done dozens of times across the internet, but instead explain how to use the Trip outside of its limits, specifically with low light and night photography.

Find the Olympus Trip 35 at KEH Camera or on eBay .

Night Photography on the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box on Shoot It With Film

Hacking the Olympus Trip 35 to Work in Low Light

The Olympus Trip 35 uses a selenium light meter to adjust aperture and shutter speed automatically, locking the shutter release if there is insufficient light which would result in underexposure.

However, the Trip also has a flash sync mode, whereby the aperture is manually selected and the shutter is set to it’s slower speed of 1/40th of a second.

This is, of course, designed to be used with a flash, but the manual aperture settings coupled with modern high speed films means you can also use the flash setting to successfully shoot the Trip at night. Don’t let that little red flag stop you…

Load a roll of 400 or 800 speed film, set the ASA to 400 and the aperture to it’s widest setting of 2.8, and you’re ready to go. That’s all there is to it.

If the scene is too bright for the set aperture of 2.8, don’t worry, the Trip’s meter is still active in flash mode and will stop down the aperture to prevent overexposure.

Related: Five Tips for Shooting Film at Night

Night Photography on the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box on Shoot It With Film

Working With the Shutter Speed and Aperture Limitations

Now, 1/40th at f/2.8 really doesn’t seem slow or wide enough to shoot at night, even with 800 speed film. But I’ve found that I get excellent results if there are enough bright lights in the scene.

I used to shoot SLRs at night on aperture priority, lens wide open to f/1.4, and, even pointing at a shop window, I’d be struggling to hand hold the camera’s chosen 1/15th or 1/8th shutter speed.

The thing is, most auto-exposure cameras will be metering for the whole scene, taking into account the vast expanse of black just as much as any light sources.

More often than not, auto-exposure for a scene like a shop window at night would result in a blown out light source and mucky shadows, and not look at all how you remember seeing the scene with your own eyes.

Have you ever tried to take a photo of a sunset with your phone camera and it’s blown out the colors and tried to expose for the foreground? Every time.

Night Photography on the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box on Shoot It With Film

What to Expect While Shooting the Olympus Trip 35 at Night

I won’t lie and tell you that using the Olympus Trip ( find on eBay ) at night will always produce perfect results. (It works best in an urban area with lots of artificial light.) But I do believe that shooting film at night can be as simple as setting the exposure once and getting on with taking photos.

An underexposed photo is better than a 2 second long exposure of motion blur!

Any grainy shadows can be clipped in using Photoshop or another image editing program to bring true black back into the shot and increase contrast.

That and slightly boosting the mid tones is pretty much the only editing I need to do to my Night Trip photos.

Night Photography on the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box on Shoot It With Film

Related: Olympus Stylus Epic Point & Shoot Film Camera Review

The Olympus Trip 35 is a quintessential point-and-shoot camera, and that doesn’t have to stop when the sun goes down.

Try it yourself with some 400 or 800 speed film and see if you agree that night photography doesn’t always require tripods and fast lenses…

All of the photos in this post were taken on a trip to Japan, using Fuji Superia Premium 400 speed film and my Trip 35 set up as I’ve described. Developed and scanned at home.

I also double exposed a roll of CineStill 800T in the Trip. Photos below.

Night Photography on the Olympus Trip 35 by Tom Box on Shoot It With Film

On a tangent…

It’s always worth checking over a ‘dead’ Olympus Trip 35 because it’s quite likely the meter is fine, and the problem is with gummed up aperture blades or other internal gubbins.

On two occasions, I’ve acquired a Trip which refuses to raise the red flag, suggesting the meter is dead, only to remove the top plate (held on by 3 easily accessible screws) and see that the meter needle is moving fine.

The problem both times lay in the sliding plates that determine aperture and shutter speed. A quick clean with naptha and it was working perfectly.

I’ve had a similar experience with an Olympus Pen EES-2 (basically the half frame Trip 35) which merely had sticky aperture blades. Half an hour of disassembly and cleaning and it’s working beautifully.

Thank you so much, Tom! Tom is a regular contributor here at Shoot It With Film, and you can check out his other articles here , like an intro to pinhole film photography and how to use prisms for creative effect . You can also check out Tom’s work on his  website  and  Instagram .

Leave your questions about shooting the Olympus Trip 35 at night below in the comments, and you can pick one up for yourself at KEH Camera or on eBay !

Shoot It With Film Magazine Issue 01 Promo Image

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Night photography on film - Tips for Shooting Film at Night by Sara Johansen on Shoot It With Film

Blog Comments

Noor Hashem

January 1, 2020 at 7:38 pm

Can i use a 200 speed film or does it have to be 400 or 800?

July 27, 2020 at 5:54 am

Hi Tom, Can you use the Fuji Superia Premium 400 speed film also during the day or you would recommend it only for night shots?

Many thanks! Px

shootitwithfilm

July 27, 2020 at 2:48 pm

Thanks for your comment, Pilar! Fuji Superia 400 is a great film to use during the day. You can check out this post for examples of what it looks like during the day: https://shootitwithfilm.com/how-to-shoot-fujifilm-superia-400/

January 22, 2021 at 8:21 am

How did you do the double exposure on the Cinestill 800T’s pics ?

January 25, 2021 at 2:22 pm

The double exposures were totally random, done by shooting a full roll, rewinding it almost to the end and then shooting over it again. – Tom

April 12, 2022 at 7:59 pm

Hi, I´m planning to use a Fuji 500T for night concert shots in my Olympus trip. Do I have to detail this to the photography laboratory? Any recomendation?

April 12, 2022 at 11:14 pm

Hi Morena! If you want it developed and scanned normally, you don’t need to let the lab know any special information. You’ll only want to let the lab know if you want the film pushed in development or if you want the film scanned a specific way (such as having it scanned for highlights to bring out the nighttime atmosphere of the images). And while you don’t have to let the lab know any special info, if you feel like it was a tricky shooting situation, you can always reach out to the lab and ask their advice for developing and scanning.

September 10, 2022 at 4:07 pm

I just purchased this camera and the red shutter flag appears over my view finder whenever it is set to automatic. I have not yet tested with film yet but my run through seems to work okay when the apture is set to any other setting (2.8-end). What does this mean? That my internal light source is dead? And if so what does this mean when shooting? Shall I just set it to sunny 16 (as a rule of thumb) but how will this look in low light?

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The Olympus Trip 35 Review: Everything You Need To Know

I’ve worked with many Olympus Trip 35s over the years and I’ve discovered the pros and cons of this brilliant little rangefinder camera!

The Olympus Trip 35 is so popular because it’s very easy to use, it has a great lens and it’s ideal for the novice photographer. Also, the Olympus Trip 35 is one of the only 35mm cameras powered by the sun, making it really handy to take on holiday with you. Since 1967 10 million units have been sold, which is a tremendous amount even today.  

If you want to know how this camera compares to others, how much you should be paying, some of its common issues and much, much more then read on!

I’ve worked with a hell of a lot of Trip 35s over the last few years and I like them because they’re really simple. If there’s something wrong with a Trip 35 I usually know it pretty much instantly because they aren’t especially complicated.

I’ve sussed out all the common issues, what can be fixed easily and what spells the end for an individual Trip 35. Usually, it’s lens fungus or an unreactive aperture that means doom for this little camera.

After years of working with them, I took one to the south coast of England to do a full review and I was actually pleasantly surprised by it. As you’ll see throughout the article, there are actually some good pictures that came from this ancient camera.

Some shots were let down by the very real limitations of this camera but on the flipside, due to the brilliant 40mm Zuiko lens, when the exposure is correct, its shots are great.

There are a lot of pros and cons to this camera so it’s well worth reading up on it to figure out if it’s the right fit for you. I enjoyed shooting it more than I expected but it wouldn’t be a camera that I’d rely on regularly.

Olympus Trip 35 Specs

Format – 35mm

ISO – 25 – 400

Battery – Solar Powered Selenium Battery

Exposure – Automatic

Shutter Speeds – 40 – 200

Flash – Hot Shoe

A Brief History Of The Olympus Trip 35

Introduced in 1967 and rolling on until 1984, the Olympus Trip 35 was completely ahead of its time. Sporting a solar-powered light meter in the late 60’s was pretty special.

Of course, Olympus’ market audience was pretty obvious, being named ‘Trip’, it’s kind of spelt out for you. Strong, reliable, doesn’t need any batteries, anyone could use it, that pretty much ticks all the boxes when it comes to a holiday camera.

Incredibly, over 10 million Trips were sold (Up for debate) and of course, they’re still being bought and sold to this day.

How Does The Olympus Trip 35 Battery Work?

The Olympus Trip 35 is powered by the sun using a selenium light meter which is the ring around the lens. This powers the light meter and allows the camera to choose the shutter speed and aperture (depending on which settings you have on). This would have been very unusual in its time but the fact that it’s still reliable today is brilliant.

Is The Trip 35 Lens Good?

Yeah, the Olympus Trip 35 has a pretty good lens but I’ve got to say, there are quite a few drawbacks. The lens itself is a beautiful 40mm 2.8 Zuiko lens, it’s pretty high quality for a camera that feels like a point-and-shoot.

I’d say the main drawback is that the focus is zonal and you only have 4 options. You should be able to see above, there’s a picture of one person, then two, then a group and then a landscape symbol. These are your focus options and it’s basically, 1.5m, 2m 3m and 6m and beyond.

This does limit the camera quite a lot but you’ve got to forgive a 50-odd-year-old camera sometimes.

The focal length is interesting, 40mm is pretty unusual but it’s still just wide enough to take the kind of pictures you’d usually take when you go on your holidays. It’d probably be preferable to have a 35mm lens but beggars can’t be choosers.

The Olympus Trip 35 Compared To The Olympus OM10

It’s worth comparing the Olympus Trip 35 with the Olympus OM10 as they’re currently at similar prices.

The Olympus Trip 35 isn’t that similar to the Olympus OM10, the Olympus Trip 35 is a small point-and-shoot rangefinder and the OM10 is an SLR however, it’s good to see what the Olympus Trip 35 is like in comparison to another well-known camera.

The Olympus OM10 would provide much better shots as it has better quality lenses and more control however, the Olympus Trip is more convenient, more compact and easier to use.

How Much Is The Olympus Trip 35 Worth?

Currently, the Olympus Trip 35 is worth around $100-125 or £70-100. You can of course get the Trip 35 for less if you try bidding for it on eBay or search thrift stores and flea markets but it’s worth trying to make sure that your Trip 35 is all working correctly.

What Kind Of Photography Is The Olympus Trip 35 Best For?

The Olympus Trip 35 is unsurprisingly best for travel-type photography. This camera was made with travel in mind as it’s small, compact, strong, easy to use and doesn’t require any batteries. Otherwise, this is also a good camera for day-to-day use. Photographers like David Bailey championed the Olympus Trip 35 believing that it was an incredibly high-quality camera. 

Although the Olympus trip 35 has a great lens it’s not necessarily overly accurate and it’s not easy to focus correctly so despite the fact that it has a 2.8 lens it doesn’t mean it’s very likely that you’ll be able to focus correctly close range and get the most out of that lens. 

This is not necessarily ideal for more professional types of photography and is definitely better to be used in day-to-day life and travel photography. 

Is The Olympus Trip 35 Fully Manual?

The Olympus Trip 35 has two settings, one is an automatic setting that chooses your aperture and shutter speed for you, it decides between a shutter speed of 40 and 200 and between apertures of 2.8 and 22.

Alternatively, you can decide the aperture and the shutter speed will be decided by the camera. All focusing is manual and all ISO needs to be changed manually.

How To Use The Olympus Trip 35

Olympus Trip 35 is a very simple camera to use once you get the hang of it, until then understanding its limitations can be slightly hard. 

If your camera seems not to be working properly try to leave it in the sun for some time to effectively charge its battery.

To open the back of the camera there is a small lever on the bottom of the side of the camera which just needs to be pulled down until the back pops open. 

To change the aperture just rotate the ring at the base of the lens, this ring will show numbers from 2.8 two 22. If you want to shoot in automatically then turn it all the way around until the red ‘A’.

To change the ISO you just need to rotate the ring on the outer edge of the lens until you are to the correct ISO.

In order to focus you need to rotate the black ring on the lens. The closest focus mode is portrait mode, then there is middle-range portrait row mode, next, there are people standing further away from you and finally, there is a full landscape mode.

To attach a flash you simply have to slide it into the hot shoe located on the top middle of the prism. 

To shoot and wind on you just have to press the shooting button on the top of the camera and then wind the black winder on the back of the camera until you can’t wind it any further.

To rewind the film you must first press the black button on the bottom of the camera to release the film and then wind the silver winder on the top left of the camera all the way back until it feels loose. 

Common Faults Of The Olympus Trip 35

As the Olympus Trip 35 is a very old camera it has a number of common faults, hopefully, I can shed some light on these and help you avoid them or potentially fix them.

Commonly the red flag of the Olympus trip 35 will stop working, the red flag usually shows you when the scene would be too under-exposed. The red flag would appear at the bottom of the viewfinder when you are looking through it and would usually stop you from taking a picture if it’s too dark.  

Sometimes the lens won’t react correctly to light, this is a great thing to check because if this is happening then it’s not really something that you can stop and it will ruin your photos. If this is happening the only advice I can give is to put it in the sun for a bit to see if this charges your selenium battery.

It’s likely that the light seals have worn away unless you bought your camera from a reputable dealer. You will probably have to replace a small number of light seals just to ensure that you do not get light leaks, this is fairly easy and if you want to find out how to do it then go to this link .

Lastly, the lens may have fungus and if the fungus is internal and it’s not something that would be easy to fix it would be much simpler just to get another one.

Final Word On The Olympus Trip 35

This is a great camera for travel and is certainly a camera to consider using. Personally, it’s not my kind of camera, I prefer more control and this just doesn’t cut it for me!

For a camera of its age, it truly is fantastic, a solar-powered vintage wonder that can still produce some beautiful shots!

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Hey! I've been shooting film for a very long time and throughout all of my 20's it's been my main format. In 2019 I started to buy and sell film cameras and I became a top rated seller on Etsy and eBay. I've built up a wealth of knowledge about different kinds of film cameras and their common issues.

Since I started photography I've produced a number of zines/prints and more recently made a book called 'So Far So Good'.

I started this website in late 2021 with hopes of helping out people who had been looking for similar information to me and so far, I'm really enjoying it.

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olympus trip 35 opinie

olympus trip 35 opinie

Olympus Trip 35 – A Fully Mechanical Vintage Point and Shoot Camera (Review)

  • May 31, 2022

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Cool to see a new review of the old analog Olympus TRIP 35 (here on eBay) ! Analog Insights writes:

In today’s episode, Jules, Paul and I review the Olympus Trip 35 – a beautiful, compact 35mm viewfinder camera with built-in selenium light meter, an excellent 40mm f/2.8 Zuiko lens and an automatic exposure mode. The camera was first introduced in 1967 and built until 1984. According to most online sources, about 10 million units were produced in these 17 years, yet this number is likely to include later plastic versions with some form of Trip branding. Looking at the actual serial numbers, it is more likely that Olympus built around 5.4 million units of the Trip 35. Paul is also known as Trip Man (https://www.tripman.co.uk), selling refurbished classic Trip 35 cameras and accessories online out of England. He is a true authority and thus my perfect guide to this wonderful little camera. I cautiously reached out to him asking whether he would be available for a conversation via Zoom and he decided to spend a short spring vacation here in Munich. We used the opportunity to take the Trip 35 out on a photo walk in Munich’s Westend district shooting Ilford Pan 400 on a cloudy day. Paul could use the Trip 35 here in Munich as it was originally intended – as a light, easy-to-use travel camera that lets you explore the world, focus on your subject and nothing else. I also took the camera out together with Jules on a photo walk around dusk in a former industrial area. To match the beautiful golden light, we shot a roll of Kodak Gold 200 rated at ISO 160 and got some excellent results as well. Let’s get started and learn more about the Trip 35.

**This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking through my links.

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Olympus Trip 35: The Light Fantastic!

I can’t remember why I actually gave up analogue photography for a few years. I think I got disillusioned with the declining quality of my prints after getting them developed cheaply at a poor quality high street developers. Digital came along and initially seemed impressive so I converted to the dark side, but after a while, I realised 2 things seemed to be missing from my photos – warmth and soul.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Then I chanced upon the joys of toy photography after buying my first Holga cameras and rediscovering the delight and excitement of those few days waiting for your photos back from the developer. Medium format photography was a lot of fun but only 12 shots on each 120 film can be prohibitive and expensive, so I decided to go to 35mm again with the Olympus Trip 35.

olympus trip 35 opinie

While I was deciding on which camera to get, I came across a Flickr site devoted to pictures taken on the Olympus Trip. I was amazed at how sharp and beautiful the photos were, so when I found a UK company selling reconditioned Trips at a very reasonable price, I knew I‘d found my new camera.

I’ll spare you the usual facts you always hear about the Trip… “selenium lens blah blah no batteries blah blah David Bailey TV adverts blah, blah, blah ". All I can say is when I received this baby and took it out of the box, it just felt SO good – wonderfully light to hold in the hand, great classic looks – and the soft sensual click of the shutter button was sexy beyond belief. I couldn’t wait to get snapping, and was so lucky not only to be living in London (one of the most photo-friendly cities in the world) but also to have plenty of the Lomographer’s best friend available to me – brilliant sunshine. So over one of the sunniest summers in years, I spent my days walking around town with my Trip.

olympus trip 35 opinie

The lightness of the camera makes you want to carry it everywhere and get as close to your subject as possible. Various colour and black and white films all gave me great results, but the real eye-opener for me was using cross-processed slide film for the first time. The sun made the colours gorgeously rich and saturated which along with the wonderfully sharp Zuiko lens helped capture that summer perfectly.

The simplicity of this camera is a joy. Its automatic exposure means you only have to worry about choosing the correct distance setting, which frees you to concentrate more on composition and subject (But you can also trick the camera into taking wonderful existing light night time shots by turning the aperture ring onto 2.8).

This simple approach helped me to take some of my best pictures ever. I entered my photo shown here of 2 lovers in Trafalgar Square in an online photography competition, and it won first prize! I am now getting paid work as an analogue photographer again, and it’s all thanks to wonderful cameras like The Olympus Trip 35. You owe it to yourself to get one.

olympus trip 35 opinie

This review was written by Lomographer droogieboy . For more analogue gear reviews from Lomographers, follow fellow analogue spirits by creating your own LomoHome .

written by droogieboy on 2011-05-24 #gear #review #olympus-trip-35 #lomography #film-photography #user-review

bradsimpson719 , clennam , johbeil , lyds95 , rowanpatrick , martinpruv , andrewdhall1988 , jazzy0o0 , af-capture , vanclecio , natran , jaszee , loulounaomi , lomonumancia65 , larissaaguiar , eola21 , blurry , sammyjames , hewzay , clogged , gborin , fairysari , bulletofmine , stouf , joepril , lu_bettyb00p , squamy , nicolas_noir , zark , life_on_mars , gvelasco , i_fung , adi_totp , superlighter , vicuna , mcrstar & panchoballard .

19 Comments

superlighter

won-der-ful gallery!

wuxiong

nice review, with great fotos...<:)

i_fung

I juz bought my olympus trip 35 from ebay~ now I juz load first film for it , thanks for you reviews and your photos are nice~!!

gvelasco

eh) great street shots

zark

I love pic no 2!

nicolas_noir

such a great gallery!

droogieboy

thank you for your kind words, people x

clogged

i love mine! that picture of the lady with the wine is my favorite. they're all wonderful :)
why thank you, clogged :)

kokokprimitif

very nice..i love my TRIP 35

cool-daddy

oh for pete's sake...I know you from the trip 35 group on that "other" site....
haha. I guess it's a small world if you're a Tripster :)

af-capture

I just started with my Trip 35 and I love your gallery ! wondering what slide film you usually use ? mine always turned out so dark after cross-processed....thank you :]
Hey jazzy0o0 ! Thanks for the kind comments. I'm trying to remember which slide film I used -I think it was possibly Fuji Velvia 400? Getting slide film cross-processed can be a bit of a lottery, but i guess the unpredictability adds to the fun. Happy snapping!

lyds95

Hey, Nice photos :) I've just bought an Olympus Trip 35. I was wondering if I take photos with it at gigs/concerts and use 200 ASA film do you think 2.8 aperture will make decent photos? Or should I use a different aperture etc?
P.S Tips would be great! As i'm new to film cameras
Sorry to get to this late LYDS95 - but I would use a good quality 400 ASA b+w film like Fuji Neopan for gig shots rather than a 200 ASA film. That way you should be fine with the 2.8 aperture. :)

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My Wandering Voyage

The Olympus Trip 35 – a perfect travel film camera

Discover the Olympus Trip 35, a film camera made for travelling | My Wandering Voyage #filmphotography #Olympus #Travel #Travelphotography

The Olympus Trip 35 is a compact, battery-free point-and-shoot 35mm film camera known for its ease of use and quality. When it was released in 1968, it was marketed as the perfect film camera to take on your travels.

NOTE: Travel is not recommended at this time. These posts are here to serve as inspiration when we can explore again. Hey there – this post likely contains affiliate links, which means I earn a commission (at no extra cost to you) if you purchase from them. This helps me earn a few dollars to run this website.

Discover the Olympus Trip 35, a film camera made for travelling | My Wandering Voyage #filmphotography #Olympus #Travel #Travelphotography

Imagine yourself as a traveller in the 1970s . Airlines were becoming more popular than ever, with more and more destinations opening up to international exploration. The Grand Tour of the 19th century had felt a resurgence for the everyday person. You only connected with those back at home by postcard and you took photos on film, waiting to share them once you returned.

With over 10 million units sold during its 16-year run, it would be likely that as a traveller in the 1970s, you would have had (or would have wanted) the Olympus Trip 35. How about today? With film photography becoming more popular again, is the Olympus Trip 35 a worthwhile film camera to take on your travels?

What is the Olympus Trip 35?

The Olympus Trip 35 is what is known as a point-and-shoot camera – one that does most of the work for you. The camera has a fixed 40mm f/2.8 lens. The camera uses just two shutter speeds and a selenium photocell as a light metre.

The Olympus Trip 35 was marketed as an easy-to-use, compact camera to take with you on your travels. They are super lightweight, take regular 35mm film and work with a click of a button.

Oastler Lake camping | Olympus Trip 35

How does the Olympus Trip 35 work

The Olympus Trip 35 doesn’t need a battery to operate, which is pretty darn cool if you ask me. It uses a solar-powered selenium photocell light metre to automatically set the aperture and select a shutter speed.

First up, the Olympus Trip 35 has an ISO range of 25 to 400, which makes it perfect for a film stock like Kodak Gold 200. You can use (the crème de la crème) Kodak Portra 400, but because that film stock is so expensive, I’d use the cheaper Kodak Gold 200 or Kodak Ultramax 400 in this point-and-shoot camera. You could even try a nice black and white film stock, although I haven’t done that yet myself.

The Olympus Trip 35 just has two shutter speeds – 1/40s or 1/200s, which the camera chooses automatically based on the available light. The camera’s aperture ranges from f/2.8 to f/22, which it also chooses automatically when in “A” mode. You can take the camera into Aperture-priority mode by twisting the aperture ring on the lens, but there’s really no need to.

The camera has a hot shoe where you could sync with a flash, although I’ve not tried that yet.

Lastly, the only thing you really need to think about when using the Olympus Trip 35 is the focus setting. The camera has four focus zones marked by four symbols: portrait, two people, a group of people and landscape. It’s relatively easy to figure out what focus range you need, but if you need more specifications, the focus zones are 1 metre, 1.5 metres, 3 metres and infinity. For most travel photos, you’re going to stick to the landscape focus zone.

Olympus Trip 35 film camera

Is the Olympus Trip 35 easy to use?

Once you get the hang of it, yes, the Olympus Trip 35 is so easy to use! The first step is to choose your film stock. The ISO ranges from 25 to 400 so you’ll want to choose a film stock in that speed. (Kodak Gold 200 and Ultramax 400 are some of my favourites).

Next, you need to load the film. There’s a small release button on the left-hand side to pop open the back cover. The 35mm film loads in like most other 35mm film cameras. You need to pop the rewinder knob up, fit in the film and push the rewinder knob back in. Then thread the leader part of the film into the take-up spool making sure that the teeth are grabbing onto the perforated part of the film. Tighten the film by using the film advance wheel, making sure the rewinder knob is turning as you crank the film advance. Close the back of the camera and advance the film three times until the counter is at 0.

Make sure you’ve set your ISO to match your film stock. You can do so by twisting the outer ring of the lens.

Make sure the aperture is set on “A” so that the camera can decide what aperture to use. Once you do that, the camera will decide on either 1/40s or 1/200s for the shutter speed based on the available light.

close up of Olympus Trip 35 lens and controls

Next, choose your focus zone. If you’re taking a portrait, use the portrait focus zone, if you’re taking a landscape, use the landscape focus zone. It’s pretty simple.

Then you look through the viewfinder you’ll notice that you can see the lens in the viewfinder. That’s because it’s a parallax viewfinder, rather than a mirror system like you see in most DSLR cameras. The viewfinder in the Olympus Trip 35 has parallax markings, which help you frame up an image when your subject is close to correct for this viewing error.

The second, very small window you see under this (which is called the Judas window – don’t ask me why) shows the aperture session and distance symbol that you’re using.

Once you look through the viewfinder, click the small shutter button on the top right to take the picture.

If a small red flag appears in the viewfinder, it just means that the camera has decided there’s not enough light and won’t take the photo.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Finding an Olympus Trip 35

I think what sold me on the Olympus Trip 35 was how easy it was to use. I had just started my journey back into film photography and I already had the 100% manual Canon AE-1. I wanted something light, enjoyable and fun to use, while still being vintage.

I think I stumbled across the camera while perusing YouTube and thought I’d look it up. I was surprised at the range of cost. Some were selling for over $300 CAD, while others were listed for only $60 CAD.

I learned that people were buying these cameras cheap, replacing the exterior with new leather and reselling them for a lot more, which is why you see Olympus Trip 35s in fun colours. I ended up looking at three Olympus Trip 35s that were for sale but weren’t functional before buying the one I found. There are two major things you need to look out for when searching for an Olympus Trip 35.

First, make sure the aperture blades aren’t stuck. Sticky aperture blades is pretty common in these vintage cameras. You can test to make sure the aperture works correctly by looking through the front of the lens as you change the apertures and pressing the shutter. The aperture blades should change accordingly, opening and closing with ease. If it doesn’t it’s not the end of the world. There are a couple of tutorials on how to fix this online.

close up of Olympus Trip 35 viewfinder and Judas window

Second, make sure the selenium photocell functions. This is key because if doesn’t work properly, the camera won’t metre light properly and your images won’t come out. To test this, you can place your hand in front of the photocell, covering it completely. Try to take a photo, if the red flag appears, it means that it works. If it takes a photo, then it means the selenium photocell isn’t working.

I looked at three different Olympus Trip 35s where the sellers didn’t know if it worked properly or not. I ended up passing on all three before finding one at a camera store in Collingwood that actually worked.

Then I put just one roll of (relatively) cheap film through it and found it worked perfectly.

The tip is to keep a lens cap on it or in a case while not using the camera. Use this handy guide for more tips when buying an Olympus Trip 35.

Why the Olympus Trip 35 is a great travel film camera?

The Trip name is a reference to its intended market—people who wanted a compact, functional camera for holidays.

For me, I think the joy of it is wrapped up in one image I took while on a camping trip in the summer. I was headed out on a kayak on Stormy Lake near Restoule Provincial Park. I wanted to bring my camera, but because I use my camera for my wedding photography business, there was no way in hell I was putting it in a kayak, even if it was protected by a dry bag. I just didn’t want to take that chance. So I put my phone and my Olympus Trip 35 in a dry bag and set off.

I had just brought my film camera out to take a photo when suddenly, a loon popped out of the lake in front of my kayak. I love the sounds of a loon and had heard them often, but I had never seen one so close. I snapped a quick photo of it with my Olympus Trip 35. I didn’t have to worry about aperture, shutter speed and I knew I already had it on landscape focus, so I just pointed the camera at the loon and snapped the photo.

By the time I put down my film camera and picked up my phone to take another photo, the loon had dove back into the depths and when it resurfaced again a few minutes later, it was too far away.

I had to wait another 3 weeks before I saw that photo, and it was even more magical once I saw the image developed.

So why is the Olympus Trip 35 such a great travel film camera?

Hopefully, by now I’ve convinced you that it is easy to use. The camera is lightweight and compact, plus it won’t accidentally take a photo if you’ve got it stashed in your bag. Plus, since it doesn’t need batteries, all you really need to worry about is making sure you have enough film!

Loon on Stormy Lake | Olympus Trip 35

Olympus Trip 35 sample photos

So far, I’ve put four rolls of film through this camera and I’ve loved how it turns out every single time. The camera is so light, it fits in my waist bag, and makes shooting a breeze. I can’t wait to take this on my next photography adventure! Here are some sample photos from the Olympus Trip 35.

little daisies | Olympus Trip 35

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How to take better travel photographs - tips and ticks | My Wandering Voyage travel blog

How to take better travel photographs

What's in my camera bag? Camera gear for travel photography | My Wandering Voyage travel blog

What’s in my camera bag? Camera gear for travel photography

olympus trip 35 opinie

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Olympus Trip 35

The Olympus Trip 35 is a fully-automatic 35mm compact camera , manufactured by Olympus from 1967 [1] to 1984, during which time over ten million units were sold, [1] though this oft-quoted figure is likely to have included later plastic-bodied Olympus cameras with Trip branding, as the original Trip 35 had serial numbers going up to around 5,400,000. [2] The auto-exposure mechanism is effectively solar-powered by a selenium cell surrounding the lens, and consequently the camera runs without batteries. Until June 1978, the shutter button was silver-coloured metal. After that date, all Trips had a black plastic button.

  • 1 Auto-exposure mechanism
  • 3 Viewfinder

Auto-exposure mechanism

With the aperture ring set to "A", the camera operates as a program automatic with a working EV range of 8.32-17.4 at ASA 100. [3] Half-pressing the shutter-release button locks the exposure with both the aperture and shutter speed (of which there are only two, 1/40 and 1/200s) fixed by a delicate but accurate mechanism. As explained by one repair page ,

The combination of aperture and shutter speed that the exposure mechanism chooses depends on the amount of light available. The precise amount of light that triggers a change of the shutter speed is not documented in the user manual, but it is believed to be around EV 13. When brightness of EV 13 or more is detected, the Trip 35 will increase the shutter speed to 1/200 sec in preference to using a smaller aperture, and use a narrower aperture as light levels increase from there, presumably to avoid the diffraction effects that affect all 35mm cameras below f/11. [4] Below EV 13, it will use the 1/40 sec speed and widen the aperture for lower light levels. The camera will refuse to fire if there is not enough light, with a red plastic flag appearing simultaneously in the viewfinder. This mechanism makes it impossible to make the error of shooting with the lens cap in place.

When the aperture is set manually (primarily for flash photography), the shutter speed is set to 1/40th of a second. However, the meter is still active even in this "manual" mode. Setting the aperture manually merely sets the widest permissible aperture, and the auto-exposure mechanism may still choose to set a smaller aperture than this if it sees fit. [4]

Other than this, the camera offers no controls for setting exposure manually, though one can easily set exposure compensation by changing the film ASA dial to a higher or lower value.

The Trip 35 has a 40mm f/2.8 Zuiko non-interchangeable lens, with four elements in three groups. Ken Rockwell suspects this to be a front-element focusing Tessar . [5] This lens has a reputation for being extremely sharp, even in the corners; in Rockwell's tests, Costco-scanned Fuji ISO 400 print film loaded into this camera out-performed a Canon 17-40 f/4 L lens in the corners. [5]

The lens provides simple zone-focusing with 4 cute distance symbols marked on the top-left of the lens. These correspond to the real distance markings on the underside of the lens: 1 meter, 1.5 meters, 3 meters, and infinity. Filter ring is 43.5mm.

The viewfinder is an albada-type, with parallax markings for closer focusing. There is a second, very small window under this, nicknamed the "Judas window", which shows the current aperture setting and distance symbol which are on the lens barrel.

A small red flag will appear in the viewfinder if the auto-exposure mechanism decides there is not enough light and refuses to fire.

This camera's aperture blades (there are two blades) tend to be become sticky over time. Before purchasing an old Olympus Trip 35, ask the seller if the aperture is properly opening and closing at all values (f/2.8-f/22). This can be done by manually selecting each aperture value and half-pressing the shutter button. Otherwise, the lens unit would have to be disassembled and cleaned.

  • ↑ 1.0 1.1 Olympus' history of EE-equipped cameras (archived)
  • ↑ Serial numbers collected by the Olympus Trip Flickr group
  • ↑ Specifications in the user-manual.
  • ↑ 4.0 4.1 See the Trip 35 program graph , and the explanation in this thread .
  • ↑ 5.0 5.1 http://www.kenrockwell.com/olympus/trip-35.htm
  • Manual available from UCL
  • Olympus Trip 35 group on Flickr
  • A modification that allows a 1/200 shutter speed with manual aperture control
  • Illustrated instructions for repairing a Trip 35
  • Trip 35 in the Olympus Global History (archived)
  • This is a trip at Classic Cameras by RaúlM.
  • Lionel's Olympus Trip 35 page in French at 35mm-compact.com
  • Olympus Trip 35 on www.collection-appareils.fr by Sylvain Halgand (in French)
  • Flickr image
  • Image by rick soloway
  • Japanese 35mm viewfinder
  • Image by Michele M. F.
  • Image by Hans Jan Dürr
  • Image by vincentnip
  • Image by Ênio Resende

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Why the Olympus Trip 35 is a Classic Camera Worth Owning

Why the Olympus Trip 35 is a Classic Camera Worth Owning

David Johnson | April 14, 2023

olympus trip 35 opinie

History of the Olympus Trip 35

Design and build quality.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Zone Focusing

Light metering, easy to use.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Affordable Price

Shooting experience.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Film Availability

Repairs and maintenance.

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olympus trip 35 opinie

If you're the proud new owner of a vintage Olympus Trip 35 film camera, you're in for a treat! This classic piece of photographic history is perfect for capturing memories with a unique analog touch with ease. In this guide, I'll walk you through the step-by-step process of using your Olympus Trip 35, complete with images and important precautions to ensure you get it right every time.

Expand the relevant guide:

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Loading film into the olympus trip 35:.

Step 1: Choose your film

Select your preferred 35mm film roll, keeping in mind that the Olympus Trip 35 is compatible with ASA/ISO speeds ranging from 25 to 400. 

olympus trip 35 opinie

Popular film brands include Kodak, Fujifilm, and Ilford. This post I wrote might be useful:  Buying 35mm Film - A Complete Guide

Step 2: Set the film speed and set the camera to manual for film loading

Set the appropriate ASA/ISO speed for your film using the dial located on the front of the camera, near the lens.

Set ISO on Olympus Trip 35 and Set to Manual F Stop

Also turn the aperture ring to any manual f number against the red line so that it isn't set to 'A'. The shutter can now be released regardless of light conditions.

Step 3: Open the camera back  

[Image 2: The Olympus Trip 35's back lock tab]

Locate the back cover lock tab on the bottom of your Olympus Trip 35. Pull it down and the camera back should pop open.

Step 4: Insert the film cartridge  

[Image 3: Film cartridge being inserted into the camera]

Lift up the rewind knob and insert the film cartridge into the film chamber on the left side of the camera, making sure the tip of the film is pointing toward the take-up spool on the right side. Then push the rewind knob back down into the roll of film (sometimes needs a wiggle or slight rotation to go all the way back down).

Step 5: Engage the film leader into the take-up spool

[Image 4: Film leader inserted into the take-up spool]

Pull the film across the camera and insert the tip securely through and into a slot on the take-up spool. Advance the film using the wind-on wheel.

Step 6: Align the film perforations  

Ensure that the film perforations are aligned with the sprocket teeth on both sides of the film.

[Image 4: Film leader inserted into the take-up spool]

This ensures the film will advance smoothly when winding.

Step 7: Close the camera back

Close the camera back tightly. The camera back should click shut, indicating it is securely closed. 

[Image 6: Closing the camera back]

IMPORTANT: Never open the camera back before fully rewinding the film, as this can expose your film to light and ruin your photos. Make sure to rewind the film completely after taking all 24 or 36 frames before unloading it.

Step 8: Advance film to '1'

Keep winding film and releasing the shutter until the film counter points to "1".  This ensures the unexposed part of the film is ready for your first photo.

olympus trip 35 opinie

IMPORTANT: Watch the rewind knob when you wind the camera on ; it should start to rotate at the same time as you wind, indicating that the film has been taken up correctly   - this is key, if this is not happening after a few shots then it probably means that the film has not been securely engaged by the take-up spool and the loading process will need to be repeated.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Step 9: Set the camera back to "Automatic" and get ready to shoot!  

Turn the aperture ring until the 'A' mark is aligned with the red line in front of the viewfinder (click stop).

olympus trip 35 opinie

Your Olympus Trip 35 is now loaded with film and ready to capture amazing photos.

olympus trip 35 opinie

Taking Photos with the Olympus Trip 35:

How to take photos with the olympus trip 35:.

Step 1: Ensure the camera is wound on

This gets the shutter ready and primed to take a photo.

Step 2: Set subject zone focus distance on the lens

The Olympus Trip 35 has 4 settings which equate to focusing zone distances away from the camera (shown on the underside of the lens barrel):

olympus trip 35 opinie

  • 🧍‍♀️Close focus  ≈  1 meter. This setting is used for focusing on anything ~1 meter away from the camera, be it close headshots or other close up details.
  • 👥 Portrait  ≈ 1.5 meters. Used for focusing on anything ~1.5 meters away from the camera, for example portraits or capturing wider details in the photo.
  • 👯    Group   ≈ 3 meters. Focusing on anything ~3 meters away from the camera, eg. full length body shots/group photos.
  • 🌄  Scenery  ≈ 5+ meters. Focusing on everything 5+ meters away from the camera, great for landscapes or subjects far away from the camera!

olympus trip 35 opinie

Step 3: Ensure aperture ring is set to 'A'

For 99% of situations in good light without a flash, it's best to leave the camera set to the red 'A'.

olympus trip 35 opinie

This lets the camera's solar powered meter set the exposure settings automatically and ensures a good exposure.

Step 4: Compose the photo using the viewfinder

olympus trip 35 opinie

Use the projected frame lines to see the area that will be captured in your photograph.   There are hash marks to indicate the change in frame at close focus.

Step 5: Take photo by pressing shutter button

olympus trip 35 opinie

There should be a small click as the shutter fires - indicating a photo has been taken! 🙌 If instead a red flag appears in the viewfinder, this is a warning that there is not enough light in the scene for a proper exposure. 

olympus trip 35 opinie

You can manually disable the red flag low light warning and take a photo anyway in low light by setting the aperture to '2.8'.

Towards  the end of the roll it is important to not try to wind on the camera hard when you start feeling quite a lot of resistance or cannot wind on further -  this signifies that the roll is finished, but if pushed too hard at this stage can result in the film snapping in the back of the camera.

Unloading Film from the Olympus Trip 35:

Step 1: Check the film counter 

Once you've taken all the photos on your film roll (either 24 or 36 frames), check the film counter to ensure you've reached the end.

[Image 10: Film counter indicating the last frame]

Towards  the end of the roll it is important to not try to wind on the camera hard when you start feeling quite a lot of resistance -  this signifies that the roll is finished and if pushed too hard can sometimes result in the film snapping in the back of the camera.

Step 2: Press rewind button in

olympus trip 35 opinie

Find the small black button on the base of the camera and push it in to disengage the film from the winding mechanism and allow the film to wind back into the film canister inside the camera.

Step 3: Rewind the film 

Press the rewind button located on the bottom of your Olympus Trip 35. Then, turn the rewind knob clockwise to rewind the film back into the cartridge. Keep rewinding until you feel the tension release, indicating that the film has been fully rewound.

Step 4: Open the camera back

olympus trip 35 opinie

Following the same steps as when loading the film, locate the camera back lock tab on the bottom of your Olympus Trip 35. Pull it outwards to open the camera back.

Step 5: Remove the film cartridge

[Image 13: Film cartridge being removed from the camera]

Pull up the rewind lever and lift the film cartridge out of the film chamber.

Step 6: Store and develop your film 

[Image 14: Film cartridge ready for storage or development]

Place the film cartridge in a light-tight container to protect it from light exposure. Take or send your film to a lab for development or develop it yourself using the appropriate chemicals and techniques.

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Cameras By Max Ltd

Should I Buy An Olympus Trip or Olympus Pen?

September 30, 2023 By Cameras By Max

A lot of customers email us asking for help choosing between the Olympus Trip and Olympus Pen camera when buying a 35mm film camera. We have written this article to help you make your decision and shed some light on the best parts of both these cameras.

Olympus Trip or Olympus Pen 35mm film cameras

DISCLAIMER: for this article, when we refer to the Olympus Pen , we are referring to the EE range of cameras, such as the Olympus Pen EE-3 , Olympus Pen EE-2 , and Olympus Pen EF . We also occasionally refer to the Olympus Pen EES-2 .

To start off, let's recap on each of these cameras and their features individually.

What is the Olympus Trip?

The Olympus Trip 35 was introduced in 1967, and discontinued in 1984, which is considered a long production run for a 35mm film camera. Over ten million Olympus Trip cameras were sold in this time.

Many people wrongly call the Olympus Trip a rangefinder camera, however we would classify it more as a point and shoot with zone focusing.

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You can read more about the Olympus Trip here:

Different colours of Olympus Trip cameras

Featured Camera: The Olympus Trip 35

Wood covered Olympus Trip 35mm film camera for beginners

How To Use The Olympus Trip

Olympus Trip camera with flash attached - can you use the Olympus Trip at night?

Can You Use the Olympus Trip At Night?

Singapore with the Olympus Trip 35mm film camera review

Singapore with the Olympus Trip: A Gallery by Daisy

But otherwise, here is a quick breakdown of its main features:

  • Zuiko 40mm f/2.8 lens
  • Focus settings (zone focusing)
  • ISO settings 
  • Red flag feature
  • Powered by selenium light cell
  • Manual advance and rewind 
  • Flash hotshoe

The Olympus Trip has a great range of features, and a lot of photographers love the red flag feature, which is common across the range of Olympus Pen cameras as well.

The main thing to remember about the Trip when comparing it to the Olympus Pen cameras is that it is a full-frame camera and has focus settings.

Olympus Trip35mm film cameras

What is the Olympus Pen?

OK, hold your horses. There are a few different types of Olympus Pen that we are talking about here in this article. All of them are excellent cameras, and we want to help you make the best decision for you!

All of the Olympus Pen cameras we are talking about have the same principal features.

Here is a breakdown of the main features on the Olympus Pen range of cameras:

  • ISO settings
  • Manual advance and rewind

These cameras begin to differ when you look at the finer details of the camera, such as the focus settings and the type of lens the camera has. 

The first, and most popular, Olympus Pen we are talking about is the Olympus Pen EE-3 . 

This Olympus Pen has a 28mm f/3.5 lens. This makes it the most wide angle of the Olympus cameras in this article (not including the EE-2, which is its baby brother.)

This Olympus Pen has no focus settings and is considered a true point and shoot film camera.

You can read more about the Olympus Pen EE-3 here:

Olympus Pen EE-3 camera

Featured Camera: The Olympus Pen EE-3

Olympus Pen EE-3 35mm film camera

How to Use The Olympus Pen EE-3 and EE-2

We will glance over the Olympus Pen EE-2 here. It is identical to the Olympus Pen EE-3, except that the trim and details are grey rather than black.

We stock this camera in a small range of pastel colours for those who like the lighter things in life.

The next Olympus Pen that we think is worth comparing against the Olympus Trip is the Olympus Pen EES-2.

The Olympus Pen EES-2 has a 30mm f/2.8 lens and focus settings. These are the same zone focus settings you will find on the Olympus Trip.

The Olympus Pen EES-2 is one of our favourites, but increasingly hard to get hold of. So if you see one in stock and would like, we recommend being as quick as possible!

Last, but not least, we have the Olympus Pen EF. 

Similar to the Olympus Pen EE-3, in that it does not have focus settings, the Olympus Pen EF stands apart from the rest of the Pens as the only one with a built-in flash. This is the camera for the night-time shooters.

OK, now we've got through all the different types of Olympus Pen that we want to discuss when comparing them to the Olympus Trip, lets move on to the comparisons.

Which Camera is Better: the Olympus Trip or the Olympus Pen?

Better is a BIG word. So, let's break it down to more manageable questions.

Which camera will produce higher quality images?

The Olympus Trip and Olympus Pen cameras all have great Zuiko lenses. They are super sharp, and produce wonderful images from edge to edge.

However, when it comes to the final image quality you get from the lab, the Olympus Trip will produce higher resolution images, as it is a full-frame, not a half-frame. As the full-frame image will be larger (physically), the image is less enlarged when scanned and printed.

That being said, half-frame cameras still stand up to a very good quality, and we have seen some incredible prints from half-frame cameras.

If you are looking for a camera to produce images that you can have enlarged on your wall as a print, we would recommend the Olympus Trip. However, if you are looking to just have images on your phone, or printed as 6" x 4" in your photo album, the Olympus Pen cameras are plenty quality enough for this.

Don't forget, the quality of your scans from the lab will greatly impact the quality of your photographs. This is why we are partnered with Gulabi , who always provide high resolution scans with their develop and scan services.

Below is a side by side comparison of the quality of images taken on the Olympus Trip (left) and the Olympus Pen EES-2 (right).

Olympus Trip sample

I want to be able to control how my images come out; which camera should I get?

The Olympus Trip and Olympus Pen cameras are mainly automatic. The shutter speed and aperture is determined for you when using the cameras on automatic mode. This is where the camera uses the selenium light cell around the lens to determine how much light will reach your negatives and how to correctly expose your image.

Where you do have some creative control is with the focus settings of the camera. As previously mentioned, the Olympus Trip has focus settings, as does the Olympus Pen EES-2 . This means you will be able to control the focus of your image, for example when taking a close-up portrait, you will be able to choose that your subject is in focus close to the lens.

Olympus Trip focus settings diagram

Both of these cameras use the same zone focusing system, which is shown above in the coloured symbols on the lens. These symbols indicate how far away the subject of your photo is. You can read more about these focus settings here .

So all you really have to weigh up when choosing between these two cameras is whether you want the camera to be half-frame or full-frame.

I travel a lot; which camera is most compact? 

We LOVE to travel with our film cameras. Having a compact camera is something that is so so helpful. 

The most compact camera out of the ones we are talking about would be the Olympus Pen EE-2 and Olympus Pen EE-3. Both of these cameras fit in the palm of your hand, and because they don't have focus settings, their lenses are very close to their bodies. 

Another plus point for this camera when travelling is that you can take 72 shots on a 36-exposure roll of film. This means you get double the amount of photos for each roll of film, meaning you can take less film with you when you travel.

I'm a night-time shooter and need a camera with flash. Which one should I get?

The only camera on this list with a built-in flash is the Olympus Pen EF . It is also the most lightweight of the bunch, as well.  When you do not have enough light for an image, simply pop up the flash and you are ready to take great night-time images. 

This camera is perfect if you are looking to take photos of your friends on nights out, or capture the nocturnal happenings of your local area. 

Now, we don't want to burst your bubble, but technically any of the cameras here could be used at night. The Olympus Trip and the Olympus Pens are all compatible with an external flash (and we sell some really small ones!)

Having a built-in flash makes life a lot easier, but read our blog here about how to use the Olympus Trip at night . The same rules apply for the Olympus Pen cameras as well.

Which camera is more economical?

This one is quite an easy answer. The Olympus Pens trump the Olympus Trip here simply because they are half-frame. You will get twice the amount of photos on one roll of film, effectively making your film 50% cheaper. 

Which camera is easier to be repaired? 

We repair and refurbish lots of Olympus Trips and Olympus Pens every month. Both of these cameras, whilst they have parts that age, are fully repairable by our team at Cameras By Max. We have enough spare parts to build cameras from scratch, and repair the ones that need some love. 

Both of these cameras are easily repaired (by a professional.) The Olympus Trip has more parts readily available, and if you did not use our repair services, other repairers are more likely to have Olympus Trip parts than Olympus Pen parts.

Olympus Trip 35 35mm film camera being disassembled and repaired

I am still not sure which camera to get.

Don't worry! Simply send us a message on our live chat, or email us here . We are always here to help, and no question is discouraged.

If you are unsure if either of these cameras are right for you, try our film camera quiz. All you have to do is answer a few questions, and then you will get a list of personalised camera recommendations. 

If you like what we do, but can't buy a camera from us, please consider buying us a cup of coffee! It helps us to keep these resources free, consistent, and accessible.

Read more of our blog posts here:

Olympus Pen EES-2 half-frame film camera

Featured Camera: The Olympus Pen EES-2

Selection of 35mm film cameras

5 of the Best 35mm Film Cameras for Beginners

View of Amsterdam Canal

5 of the Best 35mm Film Cameras for Travelling

Max, owner of Cameras By Max

Article written by: Max

Max is the owner of Cameras By Max. They work full-time repairing and refurbishing all the 35mm film cameras you see on the website. Their favourite camera (at the moment) is the Olympus XA, and their favourite city in the world is Edinburgh.

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olympus trip 35 opinie

Olympus 35RC – A Travelling Review – By Andy Larner

20 March, 2020

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My first trip with the Olympus 35RC happened when an  invite dropped into my whatsapp in early February last year. Stag-do in Budapest! Long weekend! 

Now, I’m a habitual traveler, I love traveling and the majority of my photography falls in with that. I shoot quickly and on the move. 

A stag-do though poses a specific problem… Late nights, (possible) seedy bars, clubs and ‘activities’. So what camera do I take? Do I take my beloved Yashica Lynx? No it’s way too big and obvious despite being perfect for night photography. Do I take my work horse Nikon FM, veteran of ski trips and really versatile with a 50mm or 28mm lenses to choose from? Let’s face it, no, you don’t want to be the ‘camera guy’ if you end up in a late night bar (though I usually try and hide whatever camera I have under my jacket) it’s still bulky and potentially might get you searched by bouncers. Not something I would relish in Budapest. I could of course have gone digital and taken my X100T but I did not want to have a £500 camera mugged off me in a dive bar. Stag dos often take you off the main trail and I wanted something discreet and hopefully cheap(ish) for this weekend. 

Back to the drawing board then (or my favourite camera review sites). If you clicked through to the Yashica Lynx review I wrote you might notice that I initially went in looking for something pocketable, small and with the option of semi-auto or manual. This is where I started again. After a lot of research I ended up on the Olympus 35RC . Getting hold of one in a month however was a bit of task. I started with Ebay but lost my nerve on the untested shutters and expensive postage. I definitely needed it to be under £100 and ebay auctions tended to dramatically spike beyond that at the end. 

I saw a Ricoh 500G (which does everything the RC does but for £40 and from a shop I trust) in Real Camera in Manchester but I got there too late and it was gone. Heartbroken, I asked if they had anything along the same lines. Thankfully I was talking to Paul and he asked what I had in mind, when I replied I was more looking for an Olympus 35RC, he said the magic words; I’ve got one I’ve not used for a while you could buy it off me? The poor man nearly lost a hand.  So for £75 I was the proud owner of an Olympus 35RC. It does everything I needed and this one was in great nick including an Olympus filter to protect the lens. 

The Olympus RC35 is a fully manual rangefinder of a similar size to the iconic Olympus 35 Trip but with more control for the photographer. It weighs: 415grams and it’s dimensions are 110 × 70 × 50 millimeters. F or something so small it’s reassuringly solid! As you can see above it’s tiny compared to the Yashica Lynx. 

Olympus 35RC

Firstly size; the 35RC is perfect for a jacket pocket it’s basically a rectangle, the lens is very shallow which allows it to slip in and out of the pocket without much fuss. It’s ok in my (about average) hands but the controls on the lens i.e aperture/focus can be a little fiddly due to their diddiness. That is definitely the trade off of having something so small. The 35RC’s shutter control is a dial on top and that’s absolutely fine to use. Standard shutter speeds of B – 500, with aperture from F2.8 – F22 which is a fairly standard range.

Olympus 35RC in Budapest at night

The focus is smooth though I find that if I focus quickly with the 35RC there can be a little bit of lag in the viewfinder, though this could just be mine. The viewfinder I find a little faint compared to other rangefinders I have used which can make it a little difficult if you’re shooting in shadowy/shady conditions but in bright sunlight it’s absolutely fine. 

Olympus 35RC in Budapest

The 35RC’s auto setting is shutter priority and works fairly well. Though I have missed some shots when it decides it doesn’t want to fire which can be a little frustrating. I think this is largely getting used to the exposure weighting within the sensor so it’s a bit of a learning curve. I tend to mainly trust my eye now and only use the auto if I’m strolling around in sunny 16 weather in holiday mode taking snapshots just for ease of minute changes between F11/16. I certainly didn’t get any duff shots when using the sensor so I can’t complain! The sensor does use a battery and I made the mistake of not switching it off and killing the battery after the first weekend of use. Though it takes standard batteries so it’s not a massive problem if you’re as forgetful as me. 

The lightmeter readout is at the bottom of the 35RC’s viewfinder and it very clear though it doesn’t tell you what shutter speed you have selected (EDIT- the shutter speed is at the top of the viewfinder but is so faint I never noticed it! Could be my eye position or a combination of things. Thank you to Ian in the comments below.) making you use your brain which is unfortunate if you’re me. The lightmeter reads speeds of up to 800asa and this can be changed on the front of the lens which is a bit weird. Obviously anything outside of that and you’re on your own!

The lens on the Olympus 35RC is an incredibly sharp 42mm which is a nice all rounder focal length. Good for portraits and landscapes without specialising in either. I think whether you like this focal length will depend on what kind of shooter you are. I found with my run and gun style it was flexible and I was able to get a good variety of shots while on the move. It’s really discreet and great for shooting up close.

The camera was great for the stag-do, I got some fun shots and was able to just keep it in my jacket pocket the rest of the time. I wasn’t ‘the camera guy’ but I got some really nice shots of the city (which is more my style). After this the 35RC became my traveling companion for short weekends and cabin bag only trips.

I was able to shoot in a way I haven’t before getting really close to subjects unobtrusively, meaning that my portrait shots are a bit more candid than usual. I really liked this aspect of the 35RC and I found that I shot differently when I was using it which was fun.

Olympus 35RC on the beach

This Olympus 35RC is essentially a really good simple rangefinder in a tiny package and I’ve found it an extremely useful traveling companion. Originally I got into film cameras to have a variety of types of cameras and the Olympus has to be the most handy and unobtrusive. It looks like a toy but it definitely doesn’t feel like or act like one.

Olympus 35RC in the pub

I have used is as a secondary to larger cameras and as with the stag-do where our journey began it’s great pocket camera that gives you full control if you want it and shutter priority if you don’t. The Olympus 35RC does everything a larger camera would do so I would also say it would be an excellent beginners camera as well, especially if you can get one in good condition. Even writing this review I’m thinking I might take it skiing next week. It’s small, functional and highly capable. What more could you want?

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olympus trip 35 opinie

Khürt Louis Williams on Olympus 35RC – A Travelling Review – By Andy Larner

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olympus trip 35 opinie

Ian Ronketti on Olympus 35RC – A Travelling Review – By Andy Larner

Comment posted: 23/04/2020

Andy Larner replied:

Mine is so faint I've spent all this time with it and not seen the shutter speed! I'll update the article! Cheers!

olympus trip 35 opinie

David Cuttler on Olympus 35RC – A Travelling Review – By Andy Larner

Comment posted: 24/11/2020

olympus trip 35 opinie

Kent Teffeteller on Olympus 35RC – A Travelling Review – By Andy Larner

Comment posted: 14/01/2021

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Mundy on Olympus 35RC – A Travelling Review – By Andy Larner

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IMAGES

  1. Olympus Trip 35

    olympus trip 35 opinie

  2. Olympus Trip 35

    olympus trip 35 opinie

  3. Olympus Trip 35 35mm Zone-Focus Film Camera Review

    olympus trip 35 opinie

  4. OLYMPUS TRIP 35

    olympus trip 35 opinie

  5. CÂMERA FOTOGRÁFICA OLYMPUS TRIP 35

    olympus trip 35 opinie

  6. Olympus Trip 35

    olympus trip 35 opinie

VIDEO

  1. Olympus trip 35. trip

  2. 1978 Olympus Trip 35

  3. Olympus Trip 35 vs Olympus EC-2

  4. OLYMPUS TRIP 35

  5. Olympus Trip AF 61 35mm Film Camera Point&Shoot

  6. Olympus Trip 505 35mm Film Camera Point&Shoot

COMMENTS

  1. Olympus Trip 35

    First and foremost, the Trip 35 might just be the perfect camera for the casual photophile. Olympus built this camera to document the daily adventures of the everyman, and the Trip does this beautifully. And for experienced shooters, the Trip 35 can be a great way to break free of shooter's block, or inject our shooting with something fun and ...

  2. A cult classic point and shoot

    With the camera set to 'A', based on the light hitting the meter it will choose the most appropriate aperture between f2.8 and f22. It will also choose either 1/40th or 1/200th for the shutter speed. If the amount of light isn't adequate for at very least 1/40th and f2.8 it will simply prevent the photo from being taken.

  3. How to Shoot Night Photography with the Olympus Trip 35

    Load a roll of 400 or 800 speed film, set the ASA to 400 and the aperture to it's widest setting of 2.8, and you're ready to go. That's all there is to it. If the scene is too bright for the set aperture of 2.8, don't worry, the Trip's meter is still active in flash mode and will stop down the aperture to prevent overexposure.

  4. The Olympus Trip 35 Review: Everything You Need To Know

    The Olympus Trip 35 is so popular because it's very easy to use, it has a great lens and it's ideal for the novice photographer. Also, the Olympus Trip 35 is one of the only 35mm cameras powered by the sun, making it really handy to take on holiday with you. Since 1967 10 million units have been sold, which is a tremendous amount even today.

  5. Olympus Trip 35 Review

    This little Olympus Trip 35 has limitations: There are only two shutter speeds: 1/40 sec and 1/200 sec. The camera sets them for you based on the amount of light, but if you turn the aperture dial off "A" to one of the f-stops, the shutter is 1/40. The light meter, being a selenium cell, does not have low-light capacity.

  6. Olympus Trip 35: Perfect for Trips · Lomography

    Here are the specs for the Olympus Trip 35 you probably know them already: Focus: Manual by scale, visible through viewfinder. Lens: 40mm f/2.8 Olympus D. Zuiko, 4 elements, three groups. Close Focus: 2.9' (0.9m). Diaphragm: two bladed, diamond-shaped, stopping down to about f/22. Shutter: 1/40 or 1/200, automatically selected. No bulb setting.

  7. Olympus Trip 35 Review

    This is another example of the brilliant design of the Trip 35 and yet another addition to the overall package. It has another benefit too. When it was sold new, the camera came with a lens cap. Selenium light meters theoretically have a limited lifespan and so it is good practice to keep a lens cap on the camera when it is not being used.

  8. Getting the Best From the Olympus Trip 35 · Lomography

    The Olympus Trip 35 is a cracking little camera that is capable of some stunning results from its 40 mm f/2.8 Zuiko lens. Here is a short guide for getting the best results from this camera. Image from George Rex from Wikimedia Commons. The lens of the Olympus Trip 35 is as sharp as a pin. As good as this camera is it does have its limitation.

  9. Olympus Trip 35

    Analog Insights writes: In today's episode, Jules, Paul and I review the Olympus Trip 35 - a beautiful, compact 35mm viewfinder camera with built-in selenium light meter, an excellent 40mm f/2.8 Zuiko lens and an automatic exposure mode. The camera was first introduced in 1967 and built until 1984. According to most online sources, about 10 ...

  10. Olympus Trip 35

    In today's episode, Jules, Paul and I review the Olympus Trip 35 - a beautiful, compact 35mm viewfinder camera with built-in selenium light meter, an excelle...

  11. Olympus Trip 35: The Light Fantastic! · Lomography

    Olympus Trip 35: The Light Fantastic! 19 37 Share Tweet. I can't remember why I actually gave up analogue photography for a few years. I think I got disillusioned with the declining quality of my prints after getting them developed cheaply at a poor quality high street developers. Digital came along and initially seemed impressive so I ...

  12. Camera Review: Olympus Trip 35

    Or worse, many owners left dead batteries in their cameras for years and years which eventually became corroded and ruined the cameras for future use. The selenium cell eliminates both problems. Just pick up the Olympus Trip 35 and go. The Olympus Trip 35 is insanely easy to operate. I mean so easy it makes boiling water difficult by comparison.

  13. The Olympus Trip 35

    August 28, 2022. The Olympus Trip 35 is a compact, battery-free point-and-shoot 35mm film camera known for its ease of use and quality. When it was released in 1968, it was marketed as the perfect film camera to take on your travels. NOTE: Travel is not recommended at this time.

  14. Olympus Trip 35

    The Olympus Trip 35 is a 35mm compact camera, manufactured by Olympus. It was introduced in 1967 and discontinued, after a lengthy production run, in 1984. The Trip name is a reference to its intended market—people who wanted a compact, functional camera for holidays.

  15. The Olympus Trip 35: Your first step into film photography

    Today, I'll be reviewing the Olympus Trip 35. Its sharp lens, automatic settings, and small portable design makes this camera ideal for anyone looking to get...

  16. Olympus Trip 35

    The Olympus Trip 35 is a fully-automatic 35mm compact camera, manufactured by Olympus from 1967 to 1984, during which time over ten million units were sold, though this oft-quoted figure is likely to have included later plastic-bodied Olympus cameras with Trip branding, as the original Trip 35 had serial numbers going up to around 5,400,000. The auto-exposure mechanism is effectively solar ...

  17. Why the Olympus Trip 35 is a Classic Camera Worth Owning

    The Olympus Trip 35 features a modern, straightforward appearance. It has a black synthetic leather covering over a metal body. The camera is really small and barely weighs 400 grammes. It is ideal for carrying around because it fits comfortably in your pocket. The camera is quite durable and has superb build quality.

  18. How To Use The Olympus Trip 35: The Full How-to Guide

    The Olympus Trip is really easy to use, and has some cool features that set it apart from other point and shoot 35mm film cameras. Zuiko coated 40mm f/2.8 lens: this lens is sharp, and the wide aperture makes it versatile in a lot of situations. Automatic settings: the Olympus Trip has two shutter speeds and aperture from f/2.8 to f/22.

  19. Olympus Trip 35 Review

    This is the kind of review where I have the luxury to start with a standard quote you find anywhere you read about the Olympus Trip 35: "Production of the Trip 35 lasted almost two decades, and Olympus produced more than 10 million of them". And although I couldn't help but add that statement to the start of this review, I quickly found out ...

  20. How to Use The Olympus Trip 35: A Complete Guide

    From £155.00 GBP. View all. Learn how to use your vintage Olympus Trip 35 film camera effortlessly. Our comprehensive guide covers loading and unloading film, and how to take photos with the camera. Plus, discover tips for zone focus, aperture settings, and unloading film safely.

  21. Olympus Trip 35 Camera Walkthrough

    This video is a complete walkthrough of the Olympus Trip 35 Camera. It covers everything you need to know about the camera including everything listed below:...

  22. Should I Buy An Olympus Trip or Pen? 35mm Film Camera Comparis

    The Olympus Trip 35 was introduced in 1967, and discontinued in 1984, which is considered a long production run for a 35mm film camera. Over ten million Olympus Trip cameras were sold in this time.. Many people wrongly call the Olympus Trip a rangefinder camera, however we would classify it more as a point and shoot with zone focusing.

  23. Olympus 35RC

    The Olympus RC35 is a fully manual rangefinder of a similar size to the iconic Olympus 35 Trip but with more control for the photographer. It weighs: 415grams and it's dimensions are 110 × 70 × 50 millimeters. For something so small it's reassuringly solid! As you can see above it's tiny compared to the Yashica Lynx.