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Antelope Canyon

Upper antelope canyon.

Upper Antelope Canyon This is the most photographed Slot Canyon in the world! The American Southwest is the “canyon capital of the world,”

Upper Antelope & Horseshoe Bend

The Ultimate Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend Tour Discover Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend on a guided tour that combines ease and beauty.

Lower Antelope Canyon Tour

Antelope Canyon in Page, Arizona, is the most famous slot canyon formation in all the world, and for good reason: Book a tour today and capture the magic. Find out why the American Southwest is considered the Canyon Capital of the World!

Upper & Lower Antelope Canyon Tours

Upper antelope & horseshoe bend tour, lower antelope canyon, antelope canyon x, hoop dancing & dinner, horseshoe bend / tower butte landing, the best of the southwest..

Upper Antelope Canyon

Plan your trip to the world-famous Antelope Canyon. Find exciting tours, engaging information and step-by-step itineraries to make the most of your visit. We try to help you make the most of your time by giving you all of the inside information about Antelope Canyon and the surrounding area as well as any upcoming activities.

Frequently Asked Questions: Where is Antelope Canyon? Antelope Canyon is located a few miles Southeast of the town of Page, on US Highway 98, near the Arizona/Utah border. 

Driving to Antelope Canyon

Driving to Antelope Canyon The Antelope Canyons are located in Northern Arizona, a few miles Southeast of the town of Page, Arizona. Driving distances from major cities and

Download this Map of Page and the surrounding area, compliments of Antelope Canyon Now

Local information.

Location information, photography permits, driving directions and more.

Explore Antelope Canyon by helicopter, plane, bus, boat or foot.

Itineraries

Curated schedules for southwest adventures of any length.

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Antelope Slot Canyon Tours

It's not just a tour,, it's the experience, tours and packages.

“Premier Tour Operator for Upper Antelope Canyon and the Surrounding Area.” Antelope Slot Canyon Tours by Chief Tsosie offers you the best way to explore Upper Antelope Canyon and the surrounding area. With more than three decades of experience, our native guides will share with you the stories and secrets of Page and Lake Powell. You will also enjoy a comfortable ride in our new commercial shuttle vans, no matter when you visit.

Upper Antelope Canyon

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Giftshop and Cafe Onsite

Upper antelope canyon and horseshoe bend combination tour.

Woman Walking in Upper Antelope Canyon

Tower Butte Landing with Horseshoe Bend

Additional tours and area attractions.

A hand selected collection of Tours and Attractions from the owners of Antelope Slot Canyon Tours

Horseshoe Bend Air Tour - OPEN NOW

Welcome to antelope slot canyon tours.

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“The company that offers a personal Native American experience.” Antelope Slot Canyon Tours by Chief Tsosie is located in Page Arizona, right next to the great Lake Powell, and in the center of the Grand Circle. Navajo owned and operated by Rosalind Tsosie, you’ll enjoy our personal tour of the breathless Antelope Canyon and other spectacular adventures! A special highlight of the tour, will be the authentic beauty of Native American flute music resonating throughout Antelope Canyon. Hear the wonderful Native American stories associated with Antelope Canyon by Navajo Tour Guides. Come, visit, and personally experience the mystical canyons.

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Book Your Tours Now

Book your tour online or call 928-645-5594, address / contact.

  • Phone: (928)645-5594
  • Email: Tour Information
  • -------------------------------------
  • 55 S. Lake Powell Blvd.
  • Page, AZ 86040

LOCATION MAP

Open 7 days a week.

  • Summer Hours:
  • Mon - Sat: 7:30am-5:30pm (MST)
  • Sun: 7:30-5:30PM (MST
  • Winter Hours (Oct 1st - Feb 28th)
  • Sun: 7:30am-5:30pm (MST)

Tsé Bíghanílíní Tours

Tsé Bíghanílíní Tours

Tours of upper antelope canyon | page, az.

Experience the amazing rock formations of Upper Antelope Canyon while learning about Navajo culture and history

Tour Upper Antelope Canyon

Located just 3 miles east of Page, Arizona,  Tsé Bíghanílíní provides premier private tours into the Upper Antelope Canyon. Come experience the beautiful corridors and passages of Upper Antelope Canyon with a Navajo guide that will explain the cultural knowledge of the Navajo people and the geology of the land. Our guides will also show you some of the best angles and locations for creating iconic photos. Reserve online ahead of time to guarantee your spot. We look forward to your visit!

Tour Duration: 1.5 Hours

Ages: All Ages Welcome

Difficulty: Moderate

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Our guides will teach you how to use unique camera angles and canyon lighting to capture the most colorful photos! 

Check Live Availability & Book Now

We operate in mst:, all tours include a free shuttle to and from the parking lot to the canyon site, a 5-star tour ★★★★★.

Tse Bighanilini Tours

We had a great experience on this tour with Wyatt as our guide. He was very knowledgeable about the canyon and told many stories. He particularly helped all of us take pictures, which was very considerate because I for one didn’t know what my camera could do. I now have great photos. I really like how the tour is run, going in and coming back around on the outside, making it less crowded. Thanks again for a great tour!

The tour of antelope canyon is simply amazing. The canyon pictures turned out beautiful. The customer service and care a 10+. From the very beginning everything flowed seamlessly. Our guide Rob is finely attuned to the needs of the tour group. He was informative, knowledgeable and so gracious. Our time with Rob was well spent. Thank you for sharing antelope canyon with us!

Lemoyne was the most positive enthusiastic tour guide I had ever met. While I was initially unsure about how a tour guide would help explore antelope canyon, I quickly realized it was a must. Between showing us all the silhouettes and the rock formations, Lemoyne made the experience so enjoyable and helped me truly appreciate the wonders of this canyon! Cannot appreciate Tsé Bíghanílíní Tours more!

The tour of Upper Antelope Canyon was one of the best things we did in Page! Our tour guide Rob was wonderful and helped us capture beautiful photos. He also pointed out many shapes of celebrities and characters within the rock formations. I hope in the future they add more talking points about Navajo history and culture though! If you want to get stunning photos of Antelope Canyon, this is the tour company for you! Enjoy!

We Can’t Wait to See You!

Navajo Tours

Navajo Tours

THE HEART OF ARIZONA

SOUL OF THE

NAVAJO NATION

Antelope Canyon Tours: Experience natural beauty like never before.

Book a Tour

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Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours

Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours provides one-of-a-kind tours of beautiful Upper Antelope Canyon near Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon is made up of two magnificent slot canyons that lie on land belonging to the Navajo Nation, and is a sacred site of the Navajo People as well as a Navajo Tribal Park that can be accessed by permit only.  Antelope serves as a symbol of Mother Nature’s gifts and powers, and entering is a spiritual experience akin to entering a cathedral. It is considered a solemn event deserving of respect.

Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours operates on land belonging to the Begay family, who are longstanding members of the Navajo Nation. Dalvin Etsitty runs Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours and is a member of the Begay family who has provided Antelope Canyon tours for more than 20 years. He enjoys meeting people from diverse cultures and walks of life as well as introducing them to the Canyon and the Navajo way of life. All of our tour guides are members of the Navajo Nation who are fully authorized to give tours of the Canyon and are able to provide visitors with in-depth information related to the Canyon and Navajo culture.

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Upper Antelope and the History of Antelope Canyon

Upper Antelope Canyon, which is also known as “The Crack,” is the most popular of the two slot canyons that make up Antelope Canyon. It is also the most-visited slot canyon in the American Southwest and the most-photographed in the world. The radiant sun beams that shine through its walls in the spring and summer are one of its main claims to fame, while its changing colors in the fall and winter are another mesmerizing sight to be seen. The Upper Canyon’s ease of access and lack of climbing also make it extremely popular with the family set as well as visitors who may require easy travel but still want an exciting experience in nature.

Antelope Canyon was formed over many hundreds of years by water that ran through sandstone, giving it its unique geography. Upper Antelope is called Tsé bighánílíní in Navajo, which can be translated to “The place where water runs through rocks” in English. Antelope Canyon got its name from the belief that Antelopes once grazed along the canyon in the winter.

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What Visitors Say

What are visitors saying about their Antelope Canyon, Arizona tour experience with us? Here are just a few testimonials from happy tourists:

“Our experience was marvelous.  Frank, our guide, started out by helping all of us change our camera settings so we would get good color shots.  He then proceeded to show us exactly what to look for, where to stand and how to get those ‘million dollar pictures.’  I could not have been more satisfied with our experience!” – Ellen K . on Yelp!

“We had a blast visiting the upper canyon, we came about an hour before our tour to check in, which was very quick and efficient.” – Nandez E. on Yelp!

“Loved this tour and our guide! Very knowledgeable, friendly staff.”  – Jillyhowes on TripAdvisor

“Our guide was not only knowledge about the history and geology of the canyon but he helped everyone on the tour adjust their Iphones or androids or cameras to take the best pictures possible!” – BackPacker648287 on TripAdvisor

You can find even more reviews on our testimonials page. We are committed to helping visitors have the best tour experience possible so they can go home with happy memories and newfound knowledge that they can cherish for a lifetime.

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Whether you are ready to learn more about Antelope Canyon or want to get ready to book your tour, Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours is here to help. Here are some more resources that we have created to help tourists stay informed and get as much enjoyment out of their experience at Antelope Canyon as possible:

  • Booking Information
  • What to Wear on Your Tour
  • Tickets and Prices
  • About Us and the Canyon
  • History and Formation of the Canyon
  • Contact Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours

You can find even more resources for tourists, such as hotel and weather information, on our tourist resources page. We have also compiled some information on Antelope Canyon’s location as well as some fun facts to get you even more excited for your unique tour experience.

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Booking Upper Antelope Canyon Tours

Are you ready to book your tour? Get started today, right here on our website . Please note that we do not take reservations over the phone – everything is completed right here on our user-friendly site. That being said, we always enjoy helping our visitors and potential guests with their questions and concerns. Do you have a question about our company, the Canyon or our guided tours? You can learn how to get in touch with our team on our contact page. The beauty and majesty of Antelope Canyon is only a booking away – secure your reservation today and prepare for your exciting adventure.

Book now to receive 20% off any future tour. Use promo code SUMMER20 until August 31st, 2024.

Antelope Valley Canyon Tours

Antelope Valley Canyon Tours near Page, AZ

Antelope valley canyon tours hosts hiking tours for all levels of hikers. from beginner-friendly to more advanced, we have an arizona hiking tour just for you. come enjoy the beautiful scenery and hiking trails in antelope valley.

  • Chevron down How to prepare for your Antelope Valley hike:
  • Drink adequate amount of water before your hike
  • Drink adequate amount of water the day of
  • Bring sunscreen
  • Wear closed toed shoes
  • Bring a walking stick
  • Bring extra water
  • Most Popular Tour
  • Info Moderate
  • Hour Glass 1.5 Hours
  • Users All Ages

Ligai Si Anii Canyon Tour

This is Antelope Valleys most popular and longest H-framed slot canyon. The 30-yard trail descends and ascends down into a breathtaking slot canyon.

  • Hour Glass 2 Hours
  • Users Ages 6+

Deer Canyon Tour

Come explore the deep slot canyons of Antelope Valley Canyon. This tour includes traversing down a 135 ft stairway into one of our secluded slot canyons.

Ligai Si Anii Stargazing Night Tour

Join us for a stargazing night tour in the slot canyons. Imagine gazing up at the night sky on a moonless night, with the center of the Milky Way Galaxy as your canvas.

  • Hour Glass 3 Hours
  • Users Ages 8+

Sand Dune Canyon

Come experience the newest addition to Antelope Valley Canyon Tours. This mesmerizing tour will take you through one of our most secluded and awe-inspiring slot canyons.

  • Hour Glass 3 | 1.5 Hours

Wind Pebble Canyon Tour

Travel back in time to experience what life meant to the Navajo people by taking this amazing scenic tour through Antelope Valley.

  • Hour Glass 6 | 4 Hours
  • Users Ages 12+

Rams Head Canyon Tour

Visit the upper and lower canyons of Rams Head. The Rams Head Canyon tour is a great adventure for the experienced hiker.

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Hidden Canyon Kayak

Tours & Rentals

Antelope Canyon Hike & Antelope Canyon Kayak Tour

          Price: $120 per person

$100 per child (5-11 years old).

Antelope Slot Canyon Tours: Antelope Canyon is one of the most famous canyons in the entire world, and it's right here on Lake Powell. Join us on this hiking tour and explore the grand Antelope Slot Canyon! Hike and kayak with our Lower Antelope Slot Canyon tours! You'll never forget the views and experiences that this tour provides. This tour lets you enjoy kayaking Antelope Canyon away from the enormous crowds and endless heat. Hiking Antelope Canyon you'll see the last hidden gems and unique views that you can only get on this tour! Book now and see for yourself! Enjoy our 4-hour guided hiking and Antelope Canyon kayaking tour. It launches from the Antelope Point Public Launch ramp into the Colorado River channel across from Antelope Island. We use kayaks to glide below the massive cliffs of Antelope Canyon. We follow the canyon cliffs until we reach the northernmost portion of Antelope Canyon, and from there, we begin our incredible hike through the slot canyon. This portion of Antelope Canyon is only accessible by water and by kayak. It is one of the most amazing experiences Lake Powell offers!

Scheduled Meeting Times:

8:30 am Arizona Time

10:30 am Arizona Time

1:30 pm Arizona Time

All times are stated as Arizona Time, the same as Pacific Time, unless you visit from early November to mid-March.

Meeting Location:

We'll meet in the parking area at the Antelope Point Launch Ramp. Directions will be in your confirmation email. (DO NOT Go To Antelope Point Marina!)

Expected Distance Paddled and Requirements:

The Antelope Slot Canyon Hike typically takes a 1-hour round trip ( depending on the lake's water level ) and is approximately a total distance of 1 mile (1.6km). The terrain on the hike is a mixture of rock and sand and is very flat. There will be ample opportunities to rest and take photos.

The paddling is typically 5 miles(10km) round-trip ( depending on the water level ).

Wavy conditions are possible on the 2nd half of this tour.

This tour is suitable for those with all levels of physical fitness.

Participants must have enough upper body strength to re-enter a capsized kayak with assistance from our tour guides; this is especially important in the spring and late fall when the water is cold. The route is along steep canyon walls, so getting out of the water on shore is usually very difficult.

All experience levels, from beginner to advanced, will have a great time on our trips:

We will use double kayaks on all trips.

For this tour, we use sit-on-top kayaks.

On this tour, your feet will get wet, sandy, and possibly muddy. There is some muck at the canyon's end, where you get out of the kayaks. Wear shoes or sports sandals. You can get wet.

From June - October, tours include time for a swim.

During July through mid-September, the possibility of flash floods exists. If morning rain is in the forecast, which is generally very uncommon, the guide may shorten hiking the Antelope Canyon portion of the tour for safety reasons.

There are simple bathroom facilities in the parking lot. Dry Bags are available for rent upon availability.

Our kayak Antelope Canyon tour includes all equipment.

Are you a solo paddler? You may join an existing tour!

All Glen Canyon vehicles are subject to a $30 entrance fee. National Park Annual Passes are accepted. Please visit the National Park Service's website for more information ( prices do not include gratuity for tour guides ).

Image by Olivia Hutcherson

Book Your Tour Today

Dineh Tours

DINEH TOURS

Navajo guided hiking tours in page, arizona, lower & upper antelope canyon hiking tour from page, az.

Half Day Tour of Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon from Page Arizona Pick up from Page, AZ

Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend Overlook Tour from Page, AZ

Visit the Lower Antelope Canyon Hiking Tour and Horseshoe Bend on this exciting excursion from Page.

Ultimate Trifecta of Lower & Upper Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend from Page, Arizona

Check out our tour of the Lower/Upper Antelope Canyons along with Horseshoe Bend with friendly and knowledgeable Native American tour guides.

About Dineh Tours

We are a Navajo (Native American) owned and operated tour company specializing in Antelope Canyon Navajo hiking tours from Page, Arizona. We give half-day tours of Lower and Upper Antelope Canyons. During our Navajo tours we share stories of our culture as our elders have done for a thousand generations before us. Book your Antelope Canyon Navajo tour with us today!

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TICKETS & FEES

Entrance and ticket fees all included. Prices subject to change.

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SMALL TOUR GROUP

Small Groups of 14 or less.

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NATIVE AMERICAN GUIDES

Friendly and knowledgeable Navajo tour guides who know the history and area.

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LEAVE THE DRIVING TO US

Sit back and leave the driving to us. We pick you up and drop you off, it’s that simple.

Our Affiliates

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Excellence in Customer Service

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Slot Canyon Tours Near Page, AZ

The most famous slot canyons near Page are definitely Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon, but these aren't the only slot canyons in the area. Buckskin Gulch, Waterholes Canyon, Zebra Canyon, Peek-a-Boo Canyon and the Zion Narrows (part of the Grand Circle) are quite popular among the self-guiding, canyoneering community. If you aren't an experienced enough to take on a slot canyon on your own safely, that doesn't mean Antelope Canyon is your only choice.

A few lesser known slot canyons have opened up to the public over the years, that is, with the permitted access of a tour guide company. Most of these slot canyons are on Navajo land and are a very important part of their culture and heritage. It's a priviledge that these canyons are being shared with us. Some of these other slot canyons are Cardiac Canyon, Secret Canyon, Rams Head, Ligai Si Anii and Wind Pebble Canyons. Most of these tours, if not all, are operated by Navajo tour companies and require paying an $8 Navajo Permit Fee in addition to the tour package price. Going on one of these slot canyon tours is a fantastic way to avoid the crowds and have a more relaxed experience in these truly magnificant canyons.

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Popular Slot Canyon Adventures

Buckskin Gulch Private Tour

Buckskin Gulch Private Tour

Buckskin Gulch is one of the largest slot canyons and unless you know your way around, you may miss out on seeing some of the best parts of the canyon. This Buckskin Gulch Private Tour from Kanab takes you into the slot canyon with a guide who knows the greatest areas to take photos. Plus, you'll see some of the petroglyph rock writings from the early Archaic period.

  • Hike to one of the world's largest slot canyons, Buckskin Gulch in Utah
  • A private tour takes you and just your group, allowing you to avoid crowds
  • Get great opportunities along the way for awesome photos
  • Stay cool with air-conditioned rides to and from the canyon and bottled water

WHAT GUESTS LIKE ABOUT THIS PLACE »

East Zion: Full-Day Canyoneering Adventure

East Zion: Full-Day Canyoneering Adventure

Peekaboo Slot Canyon

Peekaboo Slot Canyon

Goblin Valley State Park Canyoneering Adventure

Goblin Valley State Park Canyoneering Adventure

East Zion: Half-Day Canyoneering Tour

East Zion: Half-Day Canyoneering Tour

In the spotlight.

Horseshoe Bend Air Tour

RELATED TRIP IDEAS

Experience a Slot Canyon

SLOT CANYON EXPERIENCES IN THE SOUTHWEST

Antelope Canyon Tours - by Carolene Ekis

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UPPER ANTELOPE CANYON SIGHTSEEING TOUR

Quick Details

  • Hour Glass Duration: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Calendar Availability: Daily
  • User Ages: 0 & older
  • Map Marker Departure location: 22 S Lake Powell Blvd Page, AZ 86040
  • Info Info: This is a fully guided tour of Upper Antelope Canyon
  • Heart Health & Safety: You can read our Health & Safety policies here.

JOIN US FOR ANTELOPE CANYON TOURS

This tour offers you a fully guided walk into the Upper Antelope Canyon. Guided tours are required to visit this gem, so don’t miss this opportunity!

There is plenty of time for everyone to take photos on this tour and also enough time for you to experience the canyon. Check-in time is 30 minutes prior to tour time. From our office, we will then transport you to the canyon in our tour trucks [ Click here for example ] (your vehicle stays at our office location), the drive to the Antelope canyon is 20 minutes, the ride out is mildly bumpy – if the temps deep below freezing we could use our enclosed vans.

Once we arrive at the canyon, you will be guided through the iconic sandstone walls, shaped by years and years of water and wind. Our tour guide will show you places through the canyon to take memorable photos, tell you some history of the canyon, and some local history. The walk through the canyon is a good 1/4 mile, once we’ve reached the end of the canyon we will then proceed to hike around the canyon – this hike does involve soft sand, stairs, and ramps, best to wear closed-toe shoes. With the new hike we’re walking a total of 3/4’s of a mile. We will be in the elements so be prepared for hot summers (temps can reach 100F+) or cold winters, dress for the weather!! Bring water, we hope to see you soon.

To see more details click “check availability.”

Maybe our FAQ can answer some additional questions.

  • Chevron down Tour Duration & Reservation Information

We are OPEN YEAR-ROUND . | 7 days a week.

Tours run 100mins from start to finish, 40 mins of which is driving time to and from (20mins each way), roughly an hour on-site – transportation to and from the canyon is provided by us, with our authorized tour vehicle (private vehicles not allowed). With the additional hike the tours have been running a little longer – please devote 135 minutes from check-in to completion of the tour. Due to hike up and over the tour times have been running a tad bit longer, please plan for this.

Advance reservations are required , we can sell out far in advance. Reserve your Antelope Canyon tours online today. Sorry, but we do not maintain a waitlist , keep checking the calendar to see if something opens up.

  • Chevron down Schedule & Departure Times

Departure Times:

7:50am, 9:50am, (**)12:00pm, 2:00pm, & 4:10pm

the 4:10pm is only available from April 1st to September 30th **the 12:00pm is priced higher from April 1st through August 31st (supply and demand).

Check-In Time is 30 Mins Prior Tours run on ARIZONA TIME (MST) Be sure you factor in TIME ZONES when you travel to us

The colors in the canyon vary throughout the year with a different glow in different parts of the canyon. In winter months the 7:50 am tour time does offer dimmer conditions, due to the shorter days, however, there is still a nice glow inside the canyon, regardless the experience is still Great!

We do offer tours year-round – the colors inside the canyon are still there during the winter months – it’s just a matter of knowing your camera – most are under the impression you “have” to be in the canyon at a particular time – in our opinion – this is not true – the canyon is beautiful at all tour time – they are all unique.

ORIGINAL DEPARTURE TIMES: *7:00 a.m., 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m., & 3:30 p.m. Tours are offered year-round, except for the *7:00 a.m. tour, which is only offered during Spring & Summer seasons.

The 2025 Calendar will be available November 2024

  • Chevron down Restrictions/Advisement
  • Do not bring: Selfie sticks, tripods, strollers, or drones. Sorry, but no pets or service animals (rules about animals placed by the Navajo Nation Government).
  • No Bags on tour: No backpacks, no purses, no fanny-packs (waist bags) – UNLESS they are CLEAR, transparent bags with all items visible – You cannot put an opaque bag inside a clear bag… No weapons of any kind, no drugs, and no alcohol – do not bring the ashes of your past loved ones.
  • Dusty conditions: We advise you to dress your camera in a rain jacket (not for actual rain) to avoid the falling sand that is thrown in the canyon. Changing your lens in the canyon is at your own risk – we are not responsible for damaged cameras.
  • Weather: Please check out the expected weather at least 2 or 3 days before arrival, and be prepared for weather that can be either cold or hot. Come with layers. Bring plenty of water – small hydration packs are best.
  • There are No Restrooms: On tour, we do have a restroom in our office, but for nearly 2 hours you will not have access to a bathroom.
  • Children: We do not have age restrictions, we have children of all ages go on tour every day. When booking, if you are unable to add a child between 0-7 years old it is because we have reached the carrying capacity for children in car seats. Our truck design limits the number of children requiring car seats, we cannot accommodate all families needing space for car seats. Note: we DO NOT supply car seats, you must bring your own
  • Strict Passenger Limits: Please book the exact number of persons joining the tour, including children of all ages, yes, even babies have to have a ticket. If you arrive in our office needing seats for more people, we will not be able to squeeze them on tour. Be sure to book far in advance, as we do sell out. With Daily passenger limits, we cannot add more seats to a tour that does not have enough seats. Remember, babies need a confirmed ticket, we do not allow lap children, everyone counts toward the passenger limit.
  • NEW HIKE INVOLVED , we now have a one-way path on tour, if you’ve been on tour before the walk is no longer easy. EVERYONE joining the tour has to be able to complete the hike (there are no exceptions). To get a better idea of the hike involved, scroll down to the bottom of this page and watch our video. If you’ve had recent surgery on your knees, hips, or back you may want to reconsider this tour – the hike up and over has an elevation change of 200 ft with an incline of 20 degrees going uphill – there are stairs involved, which leads us to say this tour is not wheelchair accessible – this hike up and over must be completed in less than 15 minutes . In total, the walk from start to finish is under a mile. Random Fact: Our average elevation is 4000 feet above sea level.
  • Photographic Tours for professional photographers are no longer available, by order of the Navajo Nation 2019 was the last of the photographic tours to Upper Antelope Canyon. Nor are we able to accommodate photo shoots inside the canyon, commercial use photography/productions are simply not allowed right now, it’s unknown if we will ever be able to conduct such tours. Plenty of great photos can be taken on the Sightseer’s Tour, keep in mind it’s all hand-held photography now, tripods and monopods are not allowed on tour anymore.
  • Chevron down Cancellation Policy

READ ALL DETAILS ABOUT THE CANCELLATION POLICY:

A full refund is available if the cancellation occurs 48+ hours PRIOR to the DAY that you booked for, not within 48hrs of the time you booked (example you book the day before and want to cancel – you will Not get a full refund). Contact us by email or phone to cancel your booking. However, customers will receive a full refund* in the event of “the operator” cancelling tours due to extreme weather or other unforeseen circumstances.

contact information: email: [email protected] phone: 1-928-645-9102 our 2021 office hours are from 7am to 4pm Arizona Time.

Health and well being of everyone: If you or someone in your group has flu like symptoms, or signs of C-19 [ Click Here ] symptoms, let us know, the sooner we know the better chance you might get a partial refund (restocking fee will apply). By not telling us in advance we will consider it as a no-show with no Refund; best to notify us by email. Finally, those showing symptoms of C-19 and attempting to join the tour will have their temperature taken, if their temp is 100.4 degree F or greater the entire group will not be allowed on tour and there will be no refund.

If you miss your tour there are NO Refunds . In addition, showing up at our office, at time of check-in and notifying us someone in your party did not make it, with no prior acknowledgement, will result in no refund. Payments cannot be transferred to another date. Be sure to arrive early or even extra early – our address works on all GPS devices. Office Location:  22 South Lake Powell Boulevard – Page Arizona 86040

A reduction of passengers in your booking will not be a full refund: we will refund the tour cost but the booking fees are non-refundable (varies 2.20-8.33%) . Only a complete cancellation yields a full refund*. To avoid confusion with your credit card transactions we recommend you do not modify and or cancel your booking within 48hrs of time of booking.

We are not liable for mistakes made with online bookings (e.g. wrong date, not knowing our tours are into the Upper Antelope Canyon ). There is no need to type your credit card details to us if you cancel, if anything you could provide the last 4 numbers if you wish but Not all the numbers.

*full refunds are only available if we are refunding the same card used for booking (if your card is compromised and you’ve been given a new card – the refund will still get to you). If you used a prepaid card that you no longer have or if you want to be refunded to a different card card e.g. from Visa to Amex – the conditions for refund are different – we would only be able to refund 80% of the charge. all refunds take up to 45 days. if you have a receipt from another Lake Powell Navajo Tribal park showing you already paid the park fee, a refund could be available – if a receipt with matching dates is given to us – not an email confirmation – these refunds will not be granted in advance, only on the day of – No refunds if you forget or do not have a copy of the receipt for us.

Please understand and prepare yourself for any sudden cancellations, If cases of C-19 spike on or off the Navajo Reservation there’s a very good chance the Navajo Nation Government might shut down the canyon for an unknown period of time. If this happens we will notify you as soon as possible and apologies in advance for altering your vacation.

HIKE TO RETURN BACK TO WHERE WE PARKED OUR TRUCKS - AFTER WE'VE WALKED THROUGH THE SLOT CANYON

RELATED TOURS

  • Calendar Daily / Request
  • Hour Glass 7 - 8 hours

VERMILION ADVENTURES

Antelope Canyon Tours also offers tours to White Pocket, Buckskin Gulch, and other locations within Vermilion Cliffs. Explore the incredible National Monument with full-day tours. Click for more information!

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Upper Antelope Canyon

ekis antelope canyon tours

Upper Antelope Canyon – Tours

Antelope canyon tours.

The mysterious and haunting beauty of Antelope Canyon (also known as “Corkscrew Canyon”) awaits the adventurous traveler who seeks to discover one of the most spectacular — yet little known attractions of the Lake Powell area. A tour to this awe-inspiring sculpture set in stone is a must for amateur and professional photographers alike. Come see nature’s surprising masterpiece of color.

About us : Antelope Canyon Tours is a customer service oriented business that specializing in slot canyon tours around Page, Arizona / Lake Powell Area. Antelope Canyon Tours is a Navajo owned and operated, providing guided tours from Page, Arizona.

Our tours into the Upper Antelope Canyon begin at our office located at 22 South Lake Powell Boulevard, near the intersection of Lake Powell Boulevard and North Navajo Drive in the heart of Page, AZ. Look for the monster trucks! Call or email for directions.

To find out more details about our tours visit our main website; click the link below

We do have our main website

www.antelopecanyon.com

more details about our tours.

page arizona canyon tours

Starting April 1st to September 30th, the 11:05am and 1:10pm tours are best for full sunlight

Adventurous Antelope Canyon Tours

ADVENTUROUS ANTELOPE CANYON TOURS

Upper antelope canyon tours in page, az, no children between ages 0-7 allowed due to intensity.

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Located in Page, Arizona, Adventurous Antelope Canyon Tours provides the best views and adventures! Our knowledgable and experienced tour guides will provide you with valuable information and an enjoyable experience throughout the entire tour. Learn more about our tours below and book now!

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Upper Antelope, Owl, & Rattlesnake Canyons Tour

Dedicate half your day to experiencing the Dine (Navajo) playground. Experience each type of slot canyon—the traditional vibrance of Upper Antelope Canyon, the twist and turns of Rattlesnake Canyon, and open wide space of Owl Canyon.

  • Clock 2 hr 10 min

Upper Antelope & Rattlesnake Canyons Tour

Push your experience to another level by adding a tour through Rattlesnake Canyon in addition with Upper Antelope Canyon. Rattlesnake Canyon is a moderate hike through a V-shaped, above ground canyon with ladders.

Rattlesnake Canyon Tour

Explore Rattlesnake Canyon’s textured sandstone and phenomenal curves. Enjoy great scenic views and plenty of opportunities for abstract photography! Experience the natural illuminating sunlight on the canyon walls.

  • Clock 1 hr 20 min

Upper Antelope Canyon Tour

Experience a fully guided tour into the 8th wonder of the world, Upper Antelope Canyon! This tour will show the natural illuminating sunlight on the canyon walls, while it is changing colors throughout the seasons.

  • Clock 2 hr 30 min

Backcountry Tour

This extended tour will take you into the restricted backcountry area. In the backcountry you will see the main monuments in Tour 1 but with access to Ear of the Wind arch and the Anasazi Ruins and Petroglyphs.

  • Clock 1 hr 30 min

Scenic Tour

This tour will cover the valley’s main 17 mile self guide loop in an open air safari vehicle. On this tour you will see some of the famous and most photographic areas like The Mittens, John Ford’s Point, Totem Pole, North Window & Artist Point.

Reservations must be made online. If you cannot find the answers to your questions in our detailed FAQ section, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us by calling (928) 640-6808 .

For those looking to enrich their Northern Arizona experience and are interested in combining another tour in Sedona, Monument Valley, or Page, our dedicated The Adventurous Group Concierge team is ready to assist you. Give us a call at (928) 282-8730 to start planning your adventurous itinerary today!

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EXPLORE ALL TOURS

Not sure which of our tours is right for you? Visit our All Tours page to learn more details about each of the different tour options we offer.

READ OUR FAQ

Have questions about our Upper Antelope Canyon tours? Visit our Frequently Asked Questions page for more information.

VIEW MORE PHOTOS

Want to see more photos of our tours and get an idea of what the experience is like? Visit our photo gallery page for more great images.

page arizona canyon tours

WHY YOU SHOULD TOUR WITH US

Adventurous antelope canyon, why choose our tours, ↠ experienced tour guides users.

You’re in good hands when you tour with us! Our knowledgable guides are local to the area and have been on their tours over 100+ times.

↠ TOP-RATED TOURS Star Outline

We are consistently highly rated by top travel websites and by our loyal customers. You can read some of our excellent reviews below!

↠ WORLD-CLASS SERVICE Globe

High-quality customer service on every tour— guaranteed! We treat each of our customers like they are a part of our family.

Ready to make unforgettable memories and uncover the magic of Arizona’s upper antelope canyon? Book your tour online now!

TOP-RATED UPPER ANTELOPE CANYON TOURS IN PAGE, ARIZONA

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MEMORABLE TOUR

We toured the Upper Antelope Canyon. Connie was an amazing guide, offering camera tips, history and geography lessons, and making us feel welcome. We really appreciated the respect for the land, beauty, weather, and culture that she conveyed. Truly a memorable tour!

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This was worth every penny! The canyon is breathtaking. The tour was well organized. Roman was a great guide. Our group had a few health issues, but he was patient and made it all work by making the drive as unbumpy as possible and offered walking options on the return out of the canyon.

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INCREDIBLE TOUR

Greatly enjoyed my tour at Upper Antelope Canyon. Chris was an incredible guide. She let us have time to take as many photos as we wanted and took some great pictures of us. We weren’t rushed through at all and being in a small group made it so much more enjoyable!

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BUCKET LIST TRIP

Explored Rattlesnake Canyon with our tour guide Roman and it was amazing! Roman was a terrific guide. Our photos turned out amazing, and Roman did a great job pointing our features inside the Canyon. Well worth the drive, time, and the money! Can't recommend this tour enough!

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COME EXPERIENCE WHAT MAKES ANTELOPE CANYON A MYSTICAL CANYON

"There are stories to every landscape."   

- Rose Ann Littleman

What we offer

page arizona canyon tours

Stay and Get Away

Escape from your routine life in the city, away from work and come visit us in the rustic, rugged, beautiful lands of the Navajo Nation. Mystical Antelope Canyon Tours and Arrowhead Campground. Both located on the Navajo Nation near the town of Page, Arizona. We give our guests the opportunity to experience the Dine (Navajo) way of life by offering them the option to pitch a tent, or stay in one of our tipis. Guests are also encouraged to join us on a tour of Mystical Antelope Canyon to see for themselves. Mystical Canyon is a special and beautiful slot canyon near Page, Arizona. 

page arizona canyon tours

Come Explore

Our tours of Antelope Canyon are sure to leave you mystified. Led by Lester Littleman, he not only guides you through the canyon, but also educates and demonstrates along the way. The amazing landscape and natural beauty of the canyon is sure to bring you calm and serenity. Not to mention the feeling of accomplishment and a connection with Navajo traditions, history, and nature. Photos do not begin to convey the actual beauty of this historic canyon. You must come and experience this for yourself. We look forward to guiding you through this mystical journey.

DISCOVER WHAT MAKES ANTELOPE CANYON SO MYSTICAL

You will experience the land and culture of The Diné (Navajo) People as you are led through our adventurous canyons. 

Exploring the natural waves in canyons and witnessing the shifts in geological plates sounds absolutely breathtaking! The hidden treasures add an exciting element of mystery to the adventure. So be sure to keep your eyes peeled for any surprises along the way.   

The Diné people's connection to the canyons through their ancestors adds a profound spiritual dimension to the experience. Please respect their beliefs as you admiring the rock formations without disturbing them. Witnessing the sunbeams shining through the canyon rocks is a truly awe-inspiring sight. Be sure to keep an eye out for those magical moments as you explore the canyons. 

We welcome you to our land and look for to meeting you.

See us in person! Walk-ins Welcome. No reservation required.

Mystical antelope canyon tours.

Highway 98 Mile Marker 306, 9, Page, AZ 86040

[email protected] (928) 640-3852 or (928) 278-5010

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page arizona canyon tours

The Ultimate Guide To Page, Arizona Slot Canyon Tours To Help You Choose The Right One For You

Table of Contents

There are affiliate links in here.  I get a small commission if you purchase through them at no extra cost to you.

*Updated January 2024*  Page is home to some of the best slot canyons in Arizona, the best slot canyons in the country, really. At least the most famous slot canyons.

Sometimes it’s even a destination for road trips, not just a stop on a Utah road trip or a southwest road trip. It’s the whole trip. They are some of the most popular and best things to do in Page.

Travel Services I Recommend: AllTrails – This is my favorite hike tracking app. America the Beautiful – The national park pass is essential. Booking.com – This is great for finding and booking hotels. Get Your Guide – I recommend Get Your Guide for booking tours. National Park Obsessed – This is the best national park planner. Skyscanner – Skyscanner is great for finding and booking flights. Enterprise – This is my rental car recommendation. See all my resources here.

upper antelope canyon

Side note: triple check the tours are running before driving thousands of miles for this. I actually saw someone on Facebook who drove 3,000 miles for this in 2020 and the tours weren’t running. 🙃 Can you even imagine?

There are so many slot canyon tours in Page, Arizona, it’s incredibly overwhelming to choose either the best one or the one that’s right for you. Enter, me.

Antelope Canyon X Page arizona

I think one of the most confusing parts is that almost none of the tour company names and website URLs match. It gets confusing keeping them all straight but I’ll hopefully help with that in here.

My goal before leaving Page was to do as many slot canyon tours as I could so I could write about all of them. But they’re expensive and I couldn’t spare another $672 to do the four I have left.

upper antelope canyon

That’s right. $672 for four tours. I just did the math and to do everything in this (except for Owl Canyon) it comes out to $1112. The price of these tours astounds me.

After months of looking at all of this, I’m still astounded by the cost. And that’s just for one person. If you’re traveling as a family, you may have to sell a family member to do more than one of these.

Antelope Canyon X Page arizona

So, now that we know how horrifically expensive these are, let me help you choose which Page slot canyon tour is best for you. There are a lot to choose from but I’m confident we’ll find the right one for you.

And even though I didn’t make it to four of these, I literally can’t even pick a favorite from the ones I did see because they all have their pros and cons.

A note on pricing: As I update this post, I’ve decided to keep all prices from past years so you can see how much it changes over time (or doesn’t).   All prices will be followed by the year, the most current at the end.

rattlesnake canyon arizona

Best time to visit the Page slot canyons

If you want to see the light beams, then you’ll need to go between 11-1:30 from May to September. If not, I would still go in the time frame (prime time during the day) but you could go any time of year.

Definitely avoid mornings and later afternoon, at least for Upper, Lower, and Antelope X . Those are all more narrow letting in less light and can be very dark outside of prime time.

IF YOU WANT TO DO ANY TOUR AT PRIME TIME, YOU WILL NEED TO BOOK WELL IN ADVANCE!

What to bring on a Page slot canyon tour

You’re not allowed to bring much on a slot canyon tour in Page. No bags are allowed, no tripods unless your’e on a photography tours, but you can bring water, cell phone, and camera.

If you’re visiting in winter, be sure to dress warm, especially if you’re tour is in the morning. It can get very cold in them. I forgot gloves at Upper Antelope and my fingers were very sad about that.

rattlesnake canyon arizona

Page, Arizona slot canyon FAQ

  • Are there free slot canyons near Page, AZ? eh, not really. Maybe somewhere in Vermilion Cliffs? Wire Pass is the only self-guided slot canyon near Page, AZ that I can think of right now, but it does have a $5-6 fee.
  • Do you have to pay to get into Antelope Canyon? Yes, and it can be expensive but there are more budget-friendly ones. It just depends on which you choose to go to. I’ve listed prices below.
  • Are slot canyons dangerous? Yes! Not always but the danger of flash floods is real. If there is a risk of flash floods, tours will be canceled.
  • Are Antelope Canyon and Bryce Canyon similar? Not even a little bit. These are slot canyons (tall and narrow) and Bryce Canyon is actually technically an amphitheater, but it’s a bigger open canyon with hoodoos.
  • Are there snakes in Antelope Canyon? There could be! I’m not sure how common they are in the slot canyons (probably not very) but it’s natures so it could happen. (See Cathedral Canyon below.)
  • What is the best time to photograph Antelope Canyon? 11AM-1PM. Or as close to that time as you can get. Upper Antelope Canyon is A shaped so not much light gets in. I would not go to that one outside of the peak time.

rattlesnake canyon arizona

Tips for visiting the Page, Arizona slot canyons

  • If you’re determined to visit Upper Antelope Canyon , definitely book it in advance. Checking throughout the winter it was usually booked out a week or two but in summer I would imagine it’s more. Looking at these now, prime time is booked out a few weeks on most of these and some are almost all booked except for one or two random spots, so definitely book in advance.
  • The same goes for Lower Antelope . Really, all of them or at least keep an eye on them as your trip dates approach.
  • Pay the extra for a prime time tour . Trust me. Not all of them are more at prime time but it’s worth it.
  • Most of these tours are non-refundable so keep that in mind with any planning but check with each company.
  • If it’s raining or bad weather, they may cancel the tour and reschedule it. Refunds may depend on the company, I would check their FAQ or call and ask.
  • If it’s really windy, the tour is probably still on. Sand will blow down into the canyon and probably into your eyes. You may want something to go around your camera if you’re worried about sand getting in it with wind in the forecast.
  • These tours are not cheap. Plan to spend at least $50 per person (Antelope X is just under $50 but not much) no matter the tour but most are more.
  • Don’t forget to tip your guide! It’s not required but it is appreciated.
  • Light beams can be seen in Upper, Lower, and Antelope X from May-September usually from 11-1:30ish.
  • Sometimes prices for kids are lower, but not always, it just depends on the canyon.

upper antelope canyon

  • Upper Antelope Canyon

Ahh, Upper Antelope Canyon. This was the last slot canyon in Page I went to, literally days before we left, and it was, uhh, a little disappointing. But also not because it was not busy at all since it was mid-February and first thing in the morning.

This is also probably the most famous of the Page slot canyons. You can see the famous light beams here from May to September in that prime time tour slot (11-1:30ish.) It’s not the only canyon you can see them in.

This was honestly my least favorite of the slot canyon tours in Page because of how dark it was. It was a bummer for how much we spent on the tour. I wouldn’t do this outside of prime time.

There are five companies that offer Upper Antelope Canyon tours and we went with Adventurous Antelope Canyon so we could also go to Rattlesnake and Owl Canyons. They’re the only company that goes to those two.

Cost : $102 per person, $112 per person at prime time ($133 at prime time after tax) (2022).  $119 before fees at prime time (2024).

The good : It’s beautiful, it’s classic Antelope Canyon, it’s an easy hike.

The bad : It’s so dark outside of prime time, it’s expensive.

Who it’s good for : Photographers and anyone looking for the classic Antelope Canyon views. (Photography tours no longer exist here, though, you’d have to pick a different one if that’s a requirement for you.)

Book an Upper Antelope Canyon tour here!

rattlesnake canyon arizona

Rattlesnake Canyon

Rattlesnake Canyon was my favorite of the three canyons we saw on our last tour. It’s not as tall as Upper or Lower Antelope Canyon but it’s really beautiful.

It’s also a lot less busy because only one company goes there (though it was busier than Upper Antelope which I thought was weird.)

We didn’t see any owls in here but did get to hear some babies, so if you want to see owls but don’t want to add on Owl Canyon, this is a good option.

Cost : $209 at prime time since that’s the only time I would do it ($241 with tax). It’s more because you can only see this one with Upper Antelope (2022).  $221 before fees, I can’t find anything available to see after fees (2024).

The good : It’s less busy, it’s winding, it’s beautiful.

The bad : It’s expensive and only one company goes here so they can charge more for it just because.

Who it’s good for : People that want to see a classic Antelope Canyon but also want to see another slot canyon in Page but don’t have time for two totally separate tours.

owl canyon arizona

This was my least favorite of the Page slot canyons. We didn’t see any owls (I wasn’t too surprised), it’s short, it’s kind of wide. I wouldn’t spend the extra almost $30 for it, especially if you’re on a budget, unless you just really hope you’ll see owls.

It’s not a bad canyon by any means but compared to allllll the other slot canyon tours in Page, it’s just OK. But still not bad. If you’ve never been in a slot canyon, it could be good but if you have, it’s just fine.

Cost : $234 at prime time because that’s the only time I would do it. It’s $268 after fees and taxes because you can only do it with Upper Antelope and Rattlesnake (2022).  $275 prime time before fees, I can’t find a prime time to see after fees (2024).

The good : You might see owls, you’ll probably be the only people here

The bad : You might not see owls, it’s short (distance and height)

Who it’s good for : People that want to see owls?

lower antelope canyon page Arizona

Lower Antelope Canyon

Dixie Ellis and Kens Tours are the two companies that offer tours in Lower Antelope Canyon , the other most famous Page slot canyon. It was also the first one i went to back in 2016!

It was very busy but I did like it a lot. I was still able to get pictures without people in them and the lighting was absolutely perfect. We didn’t even book it in advance!

It’s busy but it’s beautiful and it this point if it’s between Upper and Lower Antelope , I would go for Lower. It’s more affordable, a little more fun, and beautiful.

Cost : $50 before fees ($62 after), both companies are the same (2022); $55 before fees, $72 after (2024).

The good : More adventurous (compared to Upper because it has ladders), second lowest priced of Page slot canyons, beautiful

The bad : Very busy, loots of people, crowds (I realize those are all the same thing but different words but it’s all I could think of)

Who it’s good for : Budget-travelers that want the classic Antelope Canyon vibes, photographers.

Book a Lower Antelope Canyon tour here!

ladder in waterholes canyon page az

Waterhole Canyon

Waterhole Canyon is like Antelope Canyon’s cousin. They’re part of the same extended family but not like siblings, and you can tell. It’s still beautiful but if you’re going in expecting Antelope Canyon colors and walls, you’ll be disappointed.

As long as you go in knowing it’s different, it will be great. We weren’t rushed on this tour at all in any way and it was fabulous. Only one company goes here, Waterhole Canyon Experience , and only one group goes through at a time so you’re not running in to other people.

I did Antelope X then this a day or two later and looking back I think Antelope X is prettier but this one was amazing because of how long we had in the canyon (and it’s still pretty.)

Cost : $81 before fees and everything (you pay when you get there so I’m not sure the total) (2022 and 2024)

The good : It’s way less busy, only one company goes there, it’s on the low side of the price range, there are three slot sections

The bad : It’s noot as narrow so the lighting is different than any of the Antelope Canyons

Who it’s good for : Anyone that wants to see a slot canyon but isn’t picky about which they go to (doesn’t need to be the best slot canyon in Page) and doesn’t want to go to one of the more “adventurous” canyons.

Antelope Canyon X Page arizona

Antelope Canyon X

Finally, the last one I’ve been to, Antelope X . If you want to visit one of the slot canyons near Page and you’re on a budget, Antelope Canyon X is the one for you.

This is part of the same canyon as Upper, Lower, and Mystical just a different section of it. I loved this one and while it wasn’t as bright as Lower Antelope, the curving walls were still fantastic.

Taadidiin Tours is the only company that goes here so you won’t have the crowds of Upper and Lower Antelope Canyons. We ran into one group on their way out as we went in, a photography tour, and maybe one group on our way out.

That’s just because you back track through the two canyon arms instead of going one-way like the others. Some of it felt a little rushed but not like crazy. It’s definitely worth doing.

Cost : $39 before fees, $47 after fees (2022 and 2024)

The good : It’s the lowest priced slot canyon tour in Page, it’s got tall walls, there are two slot sections, it’s not busy

The bad : The hill when you’re done with the tour?

Who it’s good for : Budget-travelers, photographers

Book an Antelope Canyon X tour here!

rattlesnake canyon arizona

Cardiac Canyon

Taaddiin Tours is the only company that goes to Cardiac Canyon and only six people per day can go. Of the ones I haven’t done yet, this is the one I want to do the most.

From the few pictures I’ve seen it looks amazing but it sounds so remote and so few people get to see it, I just want to go so bad. It involves 2.5 miles of hiking and they recommend having experience hiking if you do this one.

It actually says the canyon is 2.5 miles. I’m not sure if that’s all slot canyon or more open? It does involve a steep dune climb, though.

Cost : $236 before fees, $264 after (2022 and 2024)

The good : A lot more adventurous, better value for money since it’s a 6 hour tour compared to the 3 hours of Upper Antelope, Rattlesnake, and Owl for basically the same price. Very small groups, 6 people maximum, only one company goes here.

The bad : Expensive, two person minimum

Who it’s good for : Adventurous people that want to get off the beaten path

page arizona canyon tours

Cathedral Canyon

This two hour tour is only run by Chief Tsosie’s Tours and takes you to Cathedral Canyon, a hidden gem slot canyon near Page, Arizona.

On this tour you get to see slot canyons, Cathedral Hall, The Four Sisters, Thumb Rock, and Pucket Rock while learning about plants, animals, and human life in the area.

I asked about this one on Facebook and some said he’s been there twice and it’s great because it’s not crowded at all, but it’s not as good as Lower Antelope. He did say it’s well worth it though.

Cost : $101 before fees, $107 after with an optional $10 refund protection fee (2022 and 2024)

The good : It’s not busy, it has owls, it’s a little more adventurous

The bad : It’s expensive, it’s not much longer than other tours

Who it’s good for : Anyone looking to get off the beaten path, anyone that wants something a little more adventurous than just walking through a slot canyon

rattlesnake canyon arizona

Mystical Canyon

Literally all I can find about Mystical Antelope Canyon is from TripAdvisor . It’s a 2.5 hour tour and the few people that have reviewed it really loved it and are glad they chose it.

As far as I can tell (if you’ve done this and know differently or have opinions, let me know in the comments) Mystical slot canyon is another section of Antelope Canyon. Sometimes I see it as Mystical canyon and sometimes Mystical Antelope Canyon.

It’s a 2.5 hour tour with a half-mile hike to the canyon and that’s about all I can tell. I don’t even see an FAQ. I really would love to hear anyone’s experiences if you’ve done this one.

Cost : $128 before fees, $142 after (2022, and 2024)

The good : It’s probably not busy at all, it looks similar to other Antelope sections

The bad : It’s expensive, there is almost no information about it available online

Who it’s good for: Anyone looking for an off-the-beaten-path slot canyon in Page that isn’t too budget conscious

Book a Mystical Antelope Canyon tour here!

upper antelope canyon

Secret Canyon

Finally, Secret Canyon in Page, Arizona . This is part of a Waterhole Canyon, or a fork of it, but it’s a different tour and Horseshoe Bend Tours is the only company that goes here.

It’s a little more expensive but also includes a stop at a private Horseshoe Bend overlook that you can only visit on this tour. I also asked about this one and a few people had been to this one and they all liked it a lot.

They said it was well worth it, wasn’t rushed at all, and had plenty of time for photography. I think this is the one I’m most excited about after Cardiac. Book a Secret Canyon and Horseshoe Bend tour here .

Cost : $143 before fees, $159 after (2022); $159 before fees, $186 after (2024)

The good : No crowds, not rushed, private Horseshoe Bend overlook included

The bad : It’s expensive

Who it’s good for : Photographers, people that want to see Horseshoe Bend, too, people that really hate crowds

Book a Secret Canyon tour here!

Antelope Canyon X Page arizona

So, which Page slot canyon is the best?

While there isn’t one answer for all of the ones below, this will at least help you narrow things down. Sort of. There are multiple options for all of them so if one is booked, you might be able to do another.

For the budget-conscious: Antelope Canyon X, Lower Antelope Canyon

For the laid-back traveler: Waterhole Canyon, Secret Slot Canyon, Mystical Canyon

For the photographer: Upper Antelope, Rattlesnake, Lower Antelope, Antelope X, Secret, Mystical

For the adventurer: Cardiac Canyon, Cathedral Canyon

For the off-the-beaten-path traveler: Cardiac, Cathedral, Secret, Mystical

owl canyon arizona

Final thoughts about slot canyon tours in Page, Arizona

I’m torn. I literally ranted about these tours and companies and prices for like thirty minutes last night. Yes, they’re beautiful, and I think people should go to them, but I also think they’re absolutely over priced for what is offered.

It honestly feels like highway robbery and there are so many slot canyons you can see for free that may look a little different but are still incredible like Wire Pass slot canyon, Leprechaun Canyon, or Willis Creek slot canyon.

I also understand wanting to go to any of these though. I mean, I’ve been to all but four of these! Do I think they’re overpriced (except Lower and X)? Yes. Will I still spend $672 to see the other four.

Yes because I literally need to know. I’m one of those people that will do a hike or tour or read a book that apparently terribly gruesome or so poorly rated just because I’m curious and need to know what it’s really like. These slot canyons are one of those things.

And I’m guessing they’ll be even more expensive by the time I get to go in the future. Do I also understand why they charge so much? No, but also yes. From a business perspective, they know people will pay this much so they can charge this much. It’s tough.

I also said I don’t think I could pick a favorite, but I think it would have to be between Lower Antelope and Antelope X. They’re the most affordable and one is so busy but the other isn’t. They’re both beautiful and that’s it, I just decided they’re my favorites.

Page, AZ tours

  • Lower Antelope Canyon/Horseshoe Bend half-day tour
  • Half-day tour of Upper and Lower Antelope Canyons
  • Antelope Canyon, Lake Powell Flight, Rive r Rafting
  • Horseshoe Bend helicopter flight
  • Helicopter tour with Tower Butte landing
  • Secret Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend

If you want a fun camping experience, consider renting an Escape Campervan! They’re perfect for outdoorsy road trips for couples and (close) friends, and make for a unique camping experience. Book an Escape Campervan here!

Have you been to any slot canyons near Page? Which ones? What did you think of them? Was it worth it? Would you go again? What are your thoughts on prices for Page slot canyon tours, whether you’ve been or not? I want all of your thoughts and opinions!

There are so many great slot canyons in page arizona, it can be hard to choose one but this guide will help! page az | page az slot canyons | page arizona | page arizona slot canyons | page az things to do | upper antelope canyon | lower antelope canyon | canyon x | page slot canyons | slot canyons in page| arizona slot canyons | slot canyons in arizona | northern arizona

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4 thoughts on “ The Ultimate Guide To Page, Arizona Slot Canyon Tours To Help You Choose The Right One For You ”

This post was so informative! I just started researching all of the slot canyons in Page yesterday, and my mind is boggled. You confirmed what I was concluding on my own. Thank you.

Thank you! I’m so glad it was helpful! The amount of canyons and tours there can be so overwhelming. Enjoy your trip!

I appreciate your descriptions of the various canyons and tour operators. Also, appreciate the pricing info. Very good to review and use.

Thank you! I’m so glad you found it helpful! 😀

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48 Hours in Page, Arizona: Glen Canyon, Antelope Canyon & Horseshoe Bend

Two days. 48 hours. That’s all the time you’ve got in Page, Arizona.

While that may not be enough time to see all there is to see, that’s ample time to see Antelope Canyon, Horseshoe Bend, and a few more choice attractions that make this little desert town a big-time player in Northern Arizona’s travel and tourism scene.

So, how should you work your visit to Page, Arizona to make the most of your time? You have a few options, starting with Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon, then adding a couple more in-depth activities that will give you a closer look at Glen Canyon and/or Lake Powell.  

Seeing as though a most vacationers come to Page from Grand Canyon Village, Flagstaff or Sedona, we’ll go off that assumption as well. If you’re coming in from Zion, Bryce Canyon, SLC or points North, you can simply flip-flop this trip plan to suit your schedule.  

Early morning:

Do the majority of your packing the night before so you can start driving to Page, Arizona just after sunrise. Going direct, the drive from Grand Canyon South Rim or Flagstaff usually takes 2.5, but 3.5-4 hours ends up being a more accurate figure due to ample photo ops you’ll invariably find on the way, such as Wupatki/Sunset Crater (just North of Flagstaff), the Little Colorado River Overlook (just East of the Grand Canyon Park boundary), and Chief Yellowhorse’s world-famous roadside souvenir stand. The Historic Cameron Trading Post is a great place to stop and grab breakfast. The Navajo Taco topped with an egg is incredible, but be warned: the regular size dish is ginormous! So unless you’re running on empty, opt for the “mini.”  

Mid-morning:

Hit the Horseshoe Bend Overlook. Located just 5 miles South of Page, AZ, the parking area at Mile Marker 545 on US89 is easy to spot. A .7-mile walk on a partially paved graded trail takes you to the overlook, where a reasonable physical effort is rewarded with a now-iconic view of an incised meander of the Colorado River. Strategically placed benches can help break up the hike for anyone in your party who might be hard-pressed to tackle it all in one go. Water and sun protection is a must in this exposed desert environment, as is footwear suitable for terrain whose texture can vary from packed dirt to unwieldy “sugar” sand. Another caveat: the drop to the river below is 500’+ and at the present time, there are no guardrails, except for a small viewing platform. Children and pets should always be kept in sight and under control. There are restrooms near the parking lot. Give yourself 1.5 to 2 hours to take in the view of this hairpin turn in the river before grabbing lunch or checking into your motel. Can’t manage the walk? Here’s how you can still enjoy Horseshoe Bend.

Early or mid-afternoon:

Antelope Canyon tour. This geological oddity, called a slot canyon, has earned a well-deserved place on the photographic “must-do list” of everyone who vacations to Northern Arizona. Its soft, muted colors and almost unreal shapes must be seen in person to be fully appreciated. What you must decide before coming here is whether to tour Upper Antelope Canyon or Lower Antelope Canyon. Upper features a flat, 100 yard walk that most people can manage. Tours can be taken directly to the Tribal Park Entrance on Highway 98, or with one of three tour outfitters based in downtown Page, AZ. To tour Lower Antelope Canyon, you must be able to manage some stair climbing and light bouldering. Lower Antelope Canyon tours may be taken with one of two outfitters based at the Tribal Park Entrance Gate. Another alternative that you might consider is taking an Antelope Canyon Boat Tour from Antelope Point Marina just down the road from Lower Antelope Canyon. However you choose to tour Antelope Canyon, and whoever you choose to tour it with, booking a tour well in advance of your arrival is a given. The popularity of this attraction grows every year, along with the crowds who visit it. If the prospect of being jammed into a confined space with hundreds of people doesn’t appeal to you, or Antelope Canyon tours are already booked up, consider taking an Antelope Canyon Alternative Tour which will take you to slot canyons that match or even rival Antelope Canyon for beauty, but are nowhere near as crowded.

Depending on the time of year, your preference, and Antelope Canyon tour availability, these activities can easily be done in reverse order as well.

If all that sightseeing has made you hungry, you’ll be glad to know that Page, AZ has a wide selection of restaurants ,  both chain and independently owned, to satisfy any appetite. E verything from burgers to sushi is yours for the eating. 

It’s been some day, and your fun is just beginning! Get a good night’s sleep back at your Page, Arizona hotel or vacation rental, but don’t forget to set your alarm. You’ll find that Page, AZ is a town where folks rise early and fun starts at the crack of dawn.

Early AM (optional):

If your day back home starts with an invigorating jog or walk, that doesn’t mean you have to pass it up just because you’re on vacation. Get your morning exercise in, along with a little sightseeing, on the Page Rim View Trail . A 10-mile unpaved track that encircles Manson Mesa (Page, AZ’s original townsite), this trail is well-traveled by local walkers, joggers and mountain bikers. Manageable for adults and active children, panoramic Lake Powell views can be had around virtually any corner, but there is no access to the lake itself. Once on the trail (established trailheads are near Lake View Elementary on North Navajo Boulevard and on Rim View Ave just off Lake Powell Boulevard), you do not have to do the full 10 mile loop! There are several opportunities to get off the trail if you desire. The trail also has no shade whatsoever, so water and sun protection must be carried, and appropriate footwear worn.  

Your busy day should begin with a good breakfast. Continental or cooked-to-order breakfast is included in some Page, AZ hotel room rates. Those who prefer to do their own cooking may do so in vacation rentals or properties equipped with full kitchens. Page, AZ’s most popular breakfast eateries include the Ranch House Grille and Canyon Crepes.

Trip Plan “A” – 7:00 AM:

Check in for the Horseshoe Bend Half-Day Raft Trip . This calm water float trip traverses a glassy-smooth section of the Colorado River through the last 15 miles of Glen Canyon that remain intact. Appropriate for children as young as 4, boats launch from the foot of the mighty Glen Canyon Dam. You’ll drift through Horseshoe Bend, where you can wave “hello” to the people looking down at you from the rim, and anchor at Petroglyph Beach where those who dare can brave the cool river water for a swim, ponder ancient symbols in carved in the sandstone walls by the Ancestral Puebloans or enjoy a snack or beverage. After docking at Historic Lees Ferry, you’ll be taken back to Page via motorcoach, arriving back in town at approximately 11:30 AM.  

After a quick lunch (if you wish), a trip to the Glen Canyon Conservancy will acquaint you with Major John Wesley Powell, the first white American citizen to raft the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon in 1869, laying the groundwork for the settlement of the Southwestern  U.S., and setting off the continuing controversy about land and water conservation. A relief map of Lake Powell and the surrounding terrain will give you a greater appreciation for the size, complexity, and importance of this vital reservoir. The employees here are also some of the most knowledgeable in the area, not only about Lake Powell but Zion, Bryce Canyon, the Grand Canyon, the Wave, and way beyond. If you have a question about any destination on your itinerary, you’re bound to find answers here, along with a great selection of souvenirs for loved ones back home.  

Trip Plan “B” – 6:00 – 7:00 AM:

Pack up the cooler, pile in the rental car, and head down to Lees Ferry, approximately 1 hour’s drive from Page, AZ, to begin the Kayak Horseshoe Bend adventure! You, your family, and your personal or rental kayaks will be transported aboard a custom-built backhaul boat from Lees Ferry to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam 15 miles upriver. From there, you’ll enjoy a couple hours to a full day of paddling through the sole untouched section of Glen Canyon, including Horseshoe Bend! This experience is a more hands-on, interactive alternative to the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip, that virtually everyone (age 5 and up) can take part in safely. If you’re a first-time kayaker, no worries; you’ll be joining others like you on this calm, serene stretch of the Colorado River. Keep your eyes peeled for sights like sandstone walls rising before you, wildlife like bighorn sheep, wild horses, hawks, herons, and egrets basking in the sunshine, or searching for their next meal. The wistful cry of a canyon wren, the screech of a hawk, or the lapping of the water against your kayak are about the only sounds that will break the silence of this unforgettable day. Beach your watercraft anywhere that strikes your fancy to enjoy a picnic lunch (not included) or a hike to a panel of ancient petroglyphs. Back at Lees Ferry, beach your kayak at the designated return spot, and the rest of the day is yours. Stick around in the immediate area to explore other-worldly balanced rock gardens , get a glimpse of early pioneer life at the Lonely Dell Ranch Historic Site , or try out your rock scrambling skills in Cathedral Wash . If you’re hungry, the nearby Cliff Dweller’s Restaurant will satisfy your appetite from a surprisingly sophisticated menu, or grab a hearty burger and fries at Marble Canyon Lodge , or cool off with a cold beverage at the Lees Ferry Lodge Tavern . On your way out of town, take one last look at the Colorado River as you stroll across the Navajo Bridge pedestrian walkway.   

After your kayak trip, return to your hotel, relax and reflect on your day’s discoveries, or discover someplace different for dinner. If you still have energy and daylight to burn, a short drive off the mesa will take you to the Glen Canyon Dam Overlook , also known as the “White House” to enjoy sunset. Pop off a few rounds with a pistol or machine gun, or try your hand at axe-throwing at Gunfighter Canyon , Page’s premier indoor shooting range. Or, dance up a storm to a live band at the Gone West Steakhouse, State 48 Tavern, or The Bowl. 

If you want to sleep in tomorrow morning, go right ahead. You’ve earned it!

Day 3 already? It got here before you knew it. We hope you’ve had fun! If you’ve taken us up on the activities we’ve suggested, and maybe done a little “customizing” of your own, the last two days won’t soon be forgotten. Still, that doesn’t mean the adventure is over until you get to your next park. “Bonus activities” abound that can easily be added to your itinerary on your way out of Page, AZ for the next phase of your Grand Circle vacation:

On US89 heading toward Bryce Canyon, Zion, or St. George, Utah:

  • The “New Wave:” about one mile past the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge, a left turn opposite the turn-off to the Lake Powell Resort complex will bring you to a small but fascinating collection of rock formations that resemble “The Wave.” Unlike the “Old Wave,” no permits or admission fees are required to visit the “New Wave.” However, the unmaintained road is prone to washing out after storms, so if you see any signage directing you to “Keep Out,” obey it.  
  • The Big Water Visitor Center : crossing the border into Utah, 15 miles Northwest of Page, AZ, is an understated but impressive facility featuring dinosaur bones excavated nearby, a topographical relief map of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and award-winning paleontology and geology displays.
  • The Paria Rimrocks-Toadstools Trail: Between Page, AZ and Kanab, UT on US89 you’ll find a moderate but worthwhile hike leading to a surprising landscape of whimsical hoodoos, balanced rocks and other geological oddities. You may think you’ve arrived at the end of the 1.5 mile trail, but you haven’t: a short rock scramble leads to the main hoodoo garden. The trailhead and parking area is located between Mile Markers 19 and 20.  
  • Kanab, Utah: a once-popular shooting location for Western movies, this picturesque small town boasts ample dining and shopping options. Locals and visitors alike are partial to the Rocking V Cafe and Houston’s Trail’s End Restaurant .

On US89 en route to Flagstaff, Sedona or Phoenix:

  • The Gap Trading Post: if Old West trading posts strike your fancy, but you prefer those that have escaped flagrant commercialization, The Gap Trading Post, 45 miles South of Page on US89 will satisfy your curiosity and give you a chance to grab a cold drink. Still an active (though sometimes overlooked) commerce center, hand-made Navajo textiles, jewelry and pottery are still sold and traded here.  
  • Moenkopi Dinosaur Tracks: 20 miles South of the Gap Trading Post, a slight Eastern detour onto AZ160 will lead you to a non-descript sign advertising free parking. A Navajo Indian guide will then escort you to a site featuring fossilized dinosaur tracks, eggs and dung. Though the latter two are unconfirmed, the dinosaur tracks are the real deal. Formally, there is no charge for admission to the site, but guides to appreciate gratuities.
  • Wupatki / Sunset Crater National Monuments: Just North of Flagstaff, Arizona, this monumental “two-fer” is connected by a convenient loop drive. At Wupatki, the remnants of an ancient and surprisingly sophisticated Ancestral Puebloan Village are the primary feature. Its more unusual attributes, such as a multi-story complex and a ball court, can be explored on foot via an easy, paved trail. Sunset Crater features a cinder cone that last erupted approximately 800 years ago, which, according to geologists, is quite recent. Ask the on-site rangers if the lava tube happens to be open.
  • Please note that this suggested itinerary is assuming that you’re traveling during Page, Arizona’s peak tourist season of late spring through early fall. Due to extremely hot temperatures typical of this timeframe, being out on the water or an an exposed desert trail during mid-day to late-afternoon hours is ill-advised.
  • During the cooler periods in early spring or late fall, you can reverse the orders in which you take part in these activities and still be comfortable. On Day 2, for example, tour Glen Canyon Dam or the John Wesley Powell Museum first thing in the morning, then do the float trip or boat tour in the afternoon.
  • Be aware that many of tours and activities are only available at certain times of the year. Wintertime visitors should assume that water-based tours and scenic flights will be on seasonal hiatus, or will require a certain number of paid bookings before they will operate.

‘Til next time, good luck and happy traveling!

248 responses.

Hello! Last year you provided awesome information for me regarding a Spring trip to Arizona. We took your info and decided to do a trip this summer instead. I’m wondering if you could look at this tentative itinerary and make suggestions or perhaps have ideas for doable additions on the days we do not have activities planned. We are also staying in Hurricane, Utah since most of the things we plan to see are within 2 hours of the rental. Day 1-fly into Vegas, drive to rental at Hurricane, Utah. Day 2-Zion National Park Day 3-Bryce Canyon Day 4-Coral Pink Sand Dunes, Kanab Day 5-Antelope Canyon (we booked a tour for 10:30 a.m., Horseshoe Bend Day 6- St. George Dini tracks Day 7-Valley of Fire State Park Day 8-drive back to Vegas, fly home. Again, I appreciate any help or advice is appreciated!

Hi Kristi, I’m so sorry I’m so late responding to your inquiry! I didn’t get a notification of a new comment for some reason, otherwise, I would have replied to it in a timelier manner. So apologies again if it seemed like I was ignoring your question, that definitely wasn’t the case. Your trip plan looks pretty fun, and Hurricane, UT, is a decent central “base” from which to explore the popular sites in the area. The fact that you’re traveling during the summer months gives you more daylight hours to work with, which is good because you want to avoid driving at night in this part of the US. Most local roads are very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife or livestock can hike up your risk of an auto accident. That’s something you don’t want to experience in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Assuming your trip is occurring in mid-June, sunrise will occur at around 6.10 am, and sunset takes place just before 9:00 pm, UTAH time. On the day when you venture into Arizona to tour Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, remember that Arizona DOES NOT observe Daylight Savings Time, so everything will be one hour behind. To get the sunrise and sunset times for your exact trip dates, visit http://www.sunrise-sunset.org As a general rule of thumb, be prepared to get an early start on the day, and plan on your drive times being anywhere from 20-40% longer than what Google maps or Mapquest gives you. That’s because all roads in this part of the US are very scenic, and you will be stopping to take photos more often than you think. On your Zion day, you’ll need to drive to the town of Springdale, UT (~30 minutes from Hurricane), to park your vehicle and board the Zion Canyon Shuttle . Use of the shuttle system is mandatory for those not staying inside the park. The shuttle is free and will take you to the main sightseeing area of the park, Zion Canyon. Once there, there’s all kinds of hikes to enjoy. My personal favorite is the Upper Emerald Pools. At the present time, the main trail bridge is closed due to a recent rock fall, but you can catch the trail with a short detour at Court of the Patriarchs. If you prefer to keep hikes on the light side, the Riverside Walk and Weeping Rock Trail are easy. If you prefer more of a challenge, maybe try Scout’s Lookout, which goes part of the way up the Angel’s Landing Trail without requiring a permit. You might even venture into the Narrows for a short way. Best Hikes in Zion National Park Time/desire permitting on the way to/from Zion, you might stop at the Grafton Ghost Town . It provides a fascinating glimpse into early pioneer activity in the vicinity and the obstacles they had to overcome to eke out a living in a very challenging environment. On your Bryce Canyon day, instead of going the more “efficient” route of I-15 to UT-20 down US-89 South, take the more scenic route through the lovely mountain community of Duck Creek Village . Map At 8,500′ above sea level, this short detour will give you the opportunity to escape the heat for a bit, and maybe even do a little exploring. You can then do the quicker route on the way back, or make a “circle” through Hatch, Glendale, and Orderville . Orderville and Glendale have some cool rock shops you might enjoy stopping at. For Coral Pink Sand Dunes , hit that first thing in the morning if at all possible. The drive over from Hurricane takes ~90 minutes one way, and the sand will get VERY hot during the mid-day hours. If desired, look into renting a sandboard for a couple of hours, or book an ATV tour in advance. Since you’ll probably spend only ~3-4 hours at the sand dunes, plan on hitting some other popular spots in the Kanab, UT, area for the rest of the day, such as the Moqui Cave Museum, Moqui Sand Caves, Best Friends Animal Sanctuary, and the Belly of the Dragon. Kanab Adventure Guide For a “bonus stop,” time/daylight permitting, consider Pipe Springs National Monument near Fredonia, AZ. This is another site where the challenges of early settlement in the area can be seen and learned about, all centering around one precious commodity: water. On Day 5, remember that you’ll be dealing with a time zone difference since you’ll pass from Utah to Arizona; Arizona being one hour behind Utah. In addition to Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, other sights to visit include but are not limited to the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge, the Hanging Garden Trail (on the eastern flank of the bridge) and the New Wave (just past the Western flank of the bridge). On the drive back to Hurricane ( the drive can take anywhere from 2.5-3.5 hours ), if you wish to avoid some backtracking, consider taking a detour through Lees Ferry and Marble Canyon. This alternate route via US89A will take you along the Southern boundary of the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. Sights to include on your trip plan here include Antelope Pass Vista just South of Page where, weather permitting, there is an open-air Native American market; Navajo Bridge, which for many years, was a crucial vehicular crossing of the Colorado River; the Lonely Dell Ranch Historic District, and the balanced rock garden near Marble Canyon, including the Blanche Russell House. You might stop for dinner at the Cliff Dweller’s Lodge, and pop into the Jacob Lake Inn to pick up a bag or two of home-made cookies! On Day 6 (St George, UT), since you’ll probably spend a relatively short time doing the Dinosaur Tracks trail , you should definitely put some more items on the to-do list. Yant Flat, aka the Candy Cliffs are renowned for their rock formations similar to The Wave, but no permit is required to visit. If vintage airplanes are something you’re into, consider a visit to the Western Sky Warbird Museum at the St. George Airport, or stop for a swim at Sand Hollow State Park . Trip Map Instead of devoting all of Day 7 to the Valley of Fire State Park, maybe let this be a “chill day” where you have no plans at all except to rest and recharge. OR – visit Grand Canyon’s North Rim. Granted, that’s gonna mean a lot of time behind the wheel — 3.5 hours each way — but if you’ve never been to the Grand Canyon, you’ve come too far and are staying too close NOT to see it! And again, summer is THE time when you can actually pull it off as a day trip and still get back to your vacation rental before nightfall. Don’t worry, you can still catch the stunning Valley of Fire on the way back to Las Vegas from Hurricane , it’s a short detour off I-15. Note that during the summer months, some popular trails, such as the Fire Wave, are closed due to excessive heat. But you can still see plenty on just a “drive-by” visit. Do plan a return trip during the cooler months of the year when you can get out and explore without risk of heat stroke LOL. I hope that helps – again, sorry for the late reply! If you have further questions, don’t hesitate to contact me directly at [email protected] or [email protected] Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Thank you so much! I really appreciate your help! We are so excited for this trip!

Hi Alley, I am so happy to have found this site! My husband and I are celebrating our 50th anniversary and we are traveling around 5/25 from Scottsdale to the Grand Canyon and want to take it sites in Page and Monument Valley for about 6-7 day road trip. We are not hikers so we need an itinerary of sites we can easily drive to or easy walks. Our anniversary is on a holiday weekend so we are flexible to go a little bit earlier or later if it would be easier. Thank you!

Hey Gloria, We’re glad you’ve found this site, too – and Happy Anniversary to you and your husband, 50 years is an incredible milestone! You’ll be glad to know that with 6-7 days to work with, you can certainly enjoy the best sights of Monument Valley, Page, the Grand Canyon, and maybe more. What’s more, many popular activities are appropriate for non-hikers. Assuming you’d prefer to get the longer drive of the trip out of the way first, you could do something like this: Day 1: Drive from Scottsdale to Monument Valley. Direct drive time ~5 hours, taken at a more leisurely pace, stopping at Wupatki/Sunset Crater National Monument, Cameron Trading Post (AMAZING Navajo Tacos!), Moenkopi Dinosaur Tracks, etc., anywhere from 6-8 hours, overnight at Monument Valley Day 2: Take backcountry tour of Monument Valley first thing in AM, then drive to Page, AZ (~2-2.5 hours). Tour Secret Antelope Canyon + Horseshoe Bend , overnight in Page, AZ. Day 3: Enjoy water-based activity such as Lake Powell Boat Tour or Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip , 2nd night in Page, AZ Day 4: Drive to Grand Canyon South Rim, direct drive time ~2.5 hours, realistic drive time ~3.5-4 hours factoring in time to stop at half-dozen+ Grand Canyon viewpoints between Desert View Point and Grand Canyon Village. Overnight in Grand Canyon. Day 5: Drive to Sedona, AZ (~2 hours), take Pink Jeep Broken Arrow Tour, overnight in Sedona Day 6: 2nd day/night in Sedona, visit Tlaquepaque, Chapel of Holy Cross, art galleries, wine tastings. Day 7: Drive back to PHX/Scottsdale (~2 hours), fly home Custom Trip Map A couple of comments: I suggest the Secret Antelope Canyon/Horseshoe Bend tour because the slot canyon portion of the tour doesn’t include any stairs, but mainly, the walk to the canyon rim at Horseshoe Bend is only ~200 yards. Were you to visit the public overlook at Horseshoe Bend, it’s ~1.5 mile walk round-trip. As you are aware, May 25 does fall on a holiday weekend. Traveling earlier or later you may have an easier time making hotel and/or guided tour reservations, but it will still be busy. Whatever you decide, be sure to reserve all hotels, guided tours, dinners at higher-end restaurants, etc., ASAP. Hope that helps. If you have further questions, please feel free to contact us directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley, I am so excited to stumble across this page! Your quick and knowledgeable advice is incredible. My husband and I are meeting friends in Scottsdale March 15, 2024. The four of us would like to drive to visit Sedona, the South Rim, Page, maybe North Rim and Bryce Canyon, and some other places that would be good to see that time of year. We are in good shape and can do moderate hikes, some small climbing. We have about 6 or 7 days. My eyes are going cross-eyed from ALL the available info. What are your suggestions? Thank you in advance!!

Hi Monika, Thank you for your nice compliments! First off, you’ll have to take Grand Canyon North Rim off the agenda this time around. That side of the park is closed from late November through May 15 due to the fact that it receives heavier snowfall than its Southern counterpart. But there may be a way you can still see it — more on that in a minute 😉 Assuming you would prefer to get the longer drive(s) out of the way first, you could do something like this: Day 1 – Drive from Scottsdale to Page, AZ (~5 hours), visit Horseshoe Bend on the way into town, overnight in Page Day 2 – Tour Antelope Canyon , drive to Bryce Canyon (~2.5 hours), hike the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail on the way (between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT), overnight in Bryce Canyon Day 3 – Hike the Queen’s Garden/Navajo Loop or other trail in Bryce Canyon, drive to Zion National Park (~2 hours), overnight in Springdale, UT Day 4 – 2nd day/night in Springdale, hiking/sightseeing in Zion (Emerald Pools, Watchman Trail, Scout’s Lookout, etc.), overnight in Springdale Day 5 – Drive to Grand Canyon South Rim with short detour through Lees Ferry/Marble Canyon (avoids some backtracking), hike Cathedral Wash, Lonely Dell Ranch, or part of Spencer Trail, overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim Day 6 – Drive to Sedona (~2 hours), take helicopter flight over Grand Canyon North Rim (see what I did there? 😉 , overnight in Sedona Day 7 – 2nd day/night in Sedona (hike Devil’s Bridge, Cathedral Rock, Airport Mesa) OR drive back to Scottsdale Custom Trip Map If you’ve already been to Zion or for some reason don’t wish to visit that particular park, simply take those vacation days and give them to Sedona. You could easily spend 3-4 days there and still feel as though you’d only “scratched the surface!” Another important key to making this all work is keeping an eye on the time and being aware of when sunrise and sunset occur. Driving after dark is strongly discouraged in this part of the country due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife or livestock that can ratchet up your risk of an auto accident. That’s something you don’t want to experience in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. In mid-March sunrise takes place at around 6:30 am and sunset occurs at around 6:30 pm. Another tiny “wrinkle” is that Arizona doesn’t observe Daylight Savings Time, while Utah does, therefore, move those times one hour ahead (7.30 am/7.30 pm) for Bryce Canyon, Zion, etc. Also: the time of year you’re visiting is in the transitional period between winter and spring. Be prepared for just about ANYTHING weather-wise, from days that are sunny and brisk, to a stray late-season snowstorm (especially at the Grand Canyon and Bryce). Start monitoring the weather about 2 weeks before you travel for the most accurate gauge of what to pack. Whatever you decide, just be sure to book hotels, guided tours (they are required at Antelope Canyon), dinners at higher-end restaurants, etc., well in advance. Your trip coincides with Spring Break for many schools, so the parks will be busy at the time of your visit. I hope that helps! Please feel free to contact me directly at [email protected] if you have further questions. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi there! I am planning a 40th birthday for my husband and a few of our close friends and their spouses (8-10 people in total). We are interested in visiting Antelope Canyon, Sedona, hiking, sight seeing, spa activities (for the girls), and eating some delicious food. We are planning our trip for the last weekend in February (soon, I know!). We would like our trip to be 3 nights/4 days or maybe 4 nights/5 days. We would love to be able to stay in air bnbs together to truly enjoy our time as a group. Not sure if this is all possible, but would be so happy to hear of any suggested itineraries or advice. Thank you so much and hope to hear from you soon!

Hey Shari, Happy birthday to your husband and friends! You are correct – your trip is coming up VERY soon, so you need to get started on some reservations ASAP! If possible, try to set aside 4 nights/5 days for your trip. You’ll wish you had more time, believe me! One place that is conspicuously absent from your itinerary is the Grand Canyon. If you’ve never been there, you should allot at least one day to visit this UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of America’s most popular National Parks. Air B & B’s large enough to accommodate your entire party may be hard to come by at this point. You might consider using Flagstaff, AZ, as a “base camp” then making day trips to the various parks. You’re more likely to find a large enough vacation home there. Sedona is another possibility. The one place where you should make something of an exception is Page, AZ (for Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend). Because that’s so far North and daylength is still relatively short at that time of year, you should stay somewhere in that area – whether it’s a traditional hotel or vacation rental – for optimal comfort and safety. I don’t recall seeing where you’re flying into, so I’m gonna go off the assumption that it’s Las Vegas, NV, since statistically, most visitors to the area fly into that airport. Based on that assumption, you could do something like this: Day 1: Fly to Las Vegas, drive to Page, AZ (~5 hours), overnight in Page Day 2: Visit Horseshoe Bend (allow 60-90 minutes), tour Antelope Canyon , the drive to Flagstaff, AZ (~2.5 hours), overnight in Flagstaff Day 3: Day trip to Grand Canyon South Rim (~1.5 hour drive each way), visit Grand Canyon Village Historic District (El Tovar Hotel, Hopi House Gift Ship, Bright Angel Lodge, Lookout Studio, Kolb Studio), drive to overlooks on Hermit’s Rest Road, overnight in Flagstaff Day 4: Move to Sedona (~1 hour from Flag [that’s what we call it around here ;)], take Pink Jeep Tour, hike Bell Rock Trail, visit Chapel of the Holy Cross, Tlaquepaque, art galleries, wine tastings, overnight in Sedona Day 5: Drive back to Las Vegas (~4.5 hours), fly home If you’ve already been to the Grand Canyon, simply give that day to Sedona. You’ll find no shortage of things to see and do there! The key to making this work at the time of year you’re visiting is being aware that you won’t have much daylight to work with, and a good chunk of your time will be spent driving. You need to ensure that you are at your final destination for the day well before sundown. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the country due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife or livestock that can ratchet up your risk of an auto accident. That’s something you don’t want to experience in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. In late February, sunrise occurs at around 7:00 AM and sunset takes place at approximately 6:15 PM. Be sure to time your drives at the end of your sightseeing days accordingly! Whatever you decide, be sure to reserve your overnight accommodations, guided tours (they are required at Antelope Canyon), and meals at higher-end restaurants well in advance. I hope this helps. Please feel free to contact me directly at [email protected] if you have further questions. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

thank you for the article

Hello! My husband and I are both turning 50 this year and have decided to celebrate with a trip to the Grand Canyon area. I have read many of your posts and I’m very impressed by your knowledge of the area and would be honored if you would lay out an itinerary of the “must-dos” on our trip. It will just be the two of us coming from Florida, first week of May or last week of September and we’ll have 6 days start to finish. We are not extremely adventurous and not looking for camping, horseback riding, white water rafting, strenuous hiking, or helicopter tours but would enjoy some easy hiking, driving or guided tours, antiquing and local sightseeing. I would love to include a train ride and my husband’s one wish is to pan for gold! Would love to have your expert guidance!

Hi Crissy! Thank you for your visit, and your compliments. Congratulations on you and your husband’s big days! If you are still in a position to choose when to visit the Southwest US, I would opt for late September. Autumn weather is nearly picture-perfect at that time of year, plus must kids are back in school, so it’s mostly just us “grown-ups” out there touring. Using Phoenix, AZ, as your “staging city,” you could do something like this: Day 1: Fly to Phoenix, AZ, overnight in Phoenix Day 2: Drive to Page, AZ (~4.5 hours), tour Antelope Canyon , overnight in Page Day 3: Visit Horseshoe Bend on the way out of town, drive to Williams, AZ (~3 hours), optional detour to Marble Canyon/Lees Ferry, stop at Wupatki/Sunset Crater, overnight in Williams Day 4: Take Grand Canyon Railway to Grand Canyon South Rim, 2nd night in Williams Day 5: Drive back to Phoenix (~3 hours), visit Goldfield Ghost Town in Apache Junction (~90 minutes from Phoenix), try your hand at gold panning or gem sluicing, overnight in Phoenix Day 6: Fly home Custom Trip Map If you can possibly catch an early flight out of Florida on that 1st day, instead of spendig the night in Phoenix, you could beeline it straight up to Page, AZ. That would free up a little more time for you. Regarding the Grand Canyon Railway, it is fun and a worthwhile experience, as long as you go into it with “eyes wide open.” First off, it’s slow going: it takes ~2.5 hours to make a trip that would only take 1 hour to do by car. Second, you won’t see the Grand Canyon from the train. You won’t see it until you get to the park and get off the train. Upon arrival at the South Rim, you only have ~3.5 hours to spend sightseeing until you have to reboard the train back to Williams, for another 2.5 hour trip down the same track, through the same scenery, which is pretty in its own way, but nothing like the Grand Canyon. For a more in-depth debate on the “train vs. drive” question, watch this video: “ Should We Take The Grand Canyon Railway or Drive to the South Rim ?” The footage is a little dated, but the core principles remain evergreen. If, after careful consideration, you decide this isn’t your cup of tea, another train experience that offers up nicer scenery not too far away is the Verde Canyon Railway. It’s a 4-hour “up and back” type of trip, and in late September, they offer an “Ales on the Rails” package that includes craft beer tastings. For more information, visit http://www.verdecanyonrr.com Hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to process! If you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me directly at horseshoe.bend.com Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Hello! I was so excited to find this resource! we are considering a trip the first week of April to explore the Page, Arizona and Kanab, Utah areas. We want to see Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Zion, Coral Pink Dunes, Toadstool Hoodoos, New Wave, Coyote Buttes South, Monument Valley, Rainbow Bridge, Grand Staircase Monument, Sand Island Petroglyphs, and the Moenkopi Dinosaur Tracks. We have 7-9 time span, and would be flying in and out of Phoenix. We are open to both staying in a central location and driving or traveling and staying somewhere different. Do you have a recommendation for an itinerary that would allow us to see the aforementioned sights without rushing? Is this possible? Thank you for any and all help/advice!

Hi Kristi, The more time you can spend, the better. If you can make this a 9-day adventure, then by all means do so! A couple of small “reality checks” before I dig into this: Coyote Buttes South is an area that requires a permit to enter. These are distributed through Recreation.gov via an online reservation process held 4 months in advance of your desired hiking date, which would have been held in December 2022 for April 2023. If you have not obtained a permit through this process, it is possible to get one through a walk-in lottery held 2 days in advance of your desired hike date through Recreation.gov’s mobile phone app. You would be required to physically be within a certain geographical area, in the immediate vicinity of the towns of Page, AZ, or Kanab, UT, to participate. If you are unsuccessful at obtaining a Coyote Buttes permit, another area you might consider visiting that is just as beautiful (some would say even moreso!), and is not as strictly regulated is White Pocket. Because the access road there is quite rugged, however, we strongly recommend a guided tour in order to enjoy the experience in safety and comfort. You can find a list of companies authorized to tour this area on our companion site, http://www.TheWaveAZ.com : Hire A Guide Regarding Rainbow Bridge, with water levels of Lake Powell as they currently are (at historic lows), getting there by boat tour is not an option. ARAMARK, the concessionaire that operates many Lake Powell boat tours, does offer the option of a private boat charter with a Coast Guard certified captain for a set hourly fee, but that can be quite expensive what with Rainbow Bridge being a full-day commitment. Hiking to Rainbow Bridge is equally inconvenient since you would need to acquire a permit from the Navajo Indian Tribe, arrange for drop-off and pick-up at the trail (which is not offered commercially), and commit to a 2-3 day backpacking trek over 30+ miles of extremely rough terrain. As things stand, the best way to see Rainbow Bridge is to fly over it. Fixed-wing airplanes depart out of the Page Municipal Airport daily, weather permitting, and possibly contingent on a certain number of passengers traveling. Flight tours don’t land at the bridge, but in the space of ~30 minutes, you’ll see some incredible scenery in addition to Rainbow Bridge that you wouldn’t have otherwise been able to see by foot or by vehicle. For more information, visit Rainbow Bridge Air Tours Using Phoenix, AZ, as your staging city, you could do something like this: Day 1: Drive from Phoenix, AZ, to Monument Valley (~6 hours), stop at Moenkopi Dinosaur Tracks en route, overnight at Monument Valley Day 2: Sightseeing in Monument Valley in AM, then drive to Page, AZ, with detour through Mexican Hat and Bluff, UT, to see the Sand Island Petroglyphs and Goosenecks State Park, approximate drive time ~4 hours, overnight in Page, AZ Day 3: 2nd day/night in Page, AZ, fly over Rainbow Bridge, visit Horseshoe Bend, tour Antelope Canyon , hike to New Wave Day 4: Drive to Bryce Canyon, stopping to hike Paria Rimrocks Toadstool Hoodoos, Coral Pink Sand Dunes en route, approximate drive time ~4 hours, overnight in Bryce Canyon area Day 5: Drive to Zion National Park (~2 hours), use shuttle to access main scenic drive of park, overnight in Springdale, UT, or Kanab, UT Day 6: 2nd day/night in Zion National Park – hike Narrows or Scout’s Lookout trail? Day 7: 3rd day/night in Zion National Park – visit Kolob Canyons section of the park? Day 8: Drive back to Phoenix (~7 hours) via Marble Canyon & Lees Ferry, overnight in Phoenix Day 9: Fly home Custom Trip Map If the prospect of spending 3 nights in the Zion area didn’t appeal, you might start back to Phoenix a day earlier than suggested and visit Sedona, AZ, along the way. If it looks like I missed Grand Staircase, you actually cross into the monument between Page and Bryce Canyon. I don’t know if you’re locked into flying in and out of Phoenix, but you could just as easily make this trip happen using Las Vegas, NV, as your start/end point, which would shave a couple hours off your drive times, which are going to be long anyway. Alternate Trip Map As you’ve probably deduced, I’m suggesting transitioning between sites instead of using one or two central location(s) as a “base camp,” mainly because at the time of year you’re visiting, days are still relatively short. During the first week of April, sunrise in Page, AZ, occurs at around 6:00 AM and sunset takes place just before 7:00 PM. In Utah, they’ll be one hour “ahead,” so 7:00 AM and 8:00 PM will be the respective sunrise/sunset times there. You want to make sure you’re at your final destination for the day before nightfall. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the US due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife, even livestock animals. Kanab, UT, is along a popular migratory route for elk, and believe me, you don’t want to risk a collision with a large animal like that in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, cold (nighttime lows are still dipping down close to freezing in April), where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Whatever you decide, be sure that you reserve all hotels, guided tours (such as Antelope Canyon), dinner reservations (where needed), well in advance of your trip. Heck, it’s just around the corner, so now is not too soon to start making bookings! Hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to process. If you need further assistance, please contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thank you so much! This is wonderful information!

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I can’t believe I stumbled across this page! I feel like I won a prize!!! My bbf and I are coming out at the end of April and I’m trying to plan out the itinerary so we can see as much as possible while staying safe. We have a sedan and a truck (not sure if it’s a 4×4, it just says Chevrolet Colorado or similar on my expedia receipt) on hold right now and will release one before we go after watching the weather. We are both healthy athletic adults. I am confused about what needs permits, or how accessible trailheads are and in which order so we aren’t backtracking. This is what I am thinking so far:

Day 1 – Leave Vegas around 12:30pm, stop at BLM in Kanab to check in regarding trail conditions and to pick up some groceries. Stop at either Cat Skills Canyon or Paria Rimrock Toadstools on the way to our VRBO in Big Water. Day2- The New Wave, 11:30am check in for our upper antelope tour. Lunch in Page, Lee’s Ferry Trail or ??? Horseshoe Bend before heading back to Big Water. Can we fit more in? Day3- Wire Pass to Buckskin Gulch. Would love to do White Pocket, but am concerned about getting stuck on the road. Would also love to get to the Tee Pees somehow. Hoping we win the lottery but this is my alternate plan. Day4- The Belly of the Dragon, Hidden Lake, Sand Caves, Great Chamber. Stay in Kanab

Thank you so much!

Hi Briana, Wow, your compliment makes my day – I feel like I’m the one who won the prize! Your trip plan sounds pretty fun, still, I think you might be trying to cram just a *tad* too much into your sightseeing days. A couple of things to keep top of mind at all times: 1. Daylength. As you’ve probably read here, we strongly discourage driving after dark in this part of the US. Local roads are very dimly lit, plus deer, elk, and livestock animals like to graze near them after dark, which would greatly increase your chance of an auto accident. It’s not something you want to chance in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, possibly cold (nighttime lows can still dip into the 30’s and below in April), where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. In late April, sunrise and sunset in Page, AZ, occur at around 5:30 am and 7:15 pm respectively. 2. Time Zones: Utah DOES observe Daylight Saving Time, but Arizona does not. So for Kanab, UT, move those sunrise/sunset times up 1 hour (6:30 am/8:15 pm). Big Water, UT, however, can be a mixed bag; since most of that town’s residents actually commute for work in Page, they tend to use Page time, but others keep their clocks on Kanab time. Be sure to check with someone local as to what time is being observed. On Day 1, for example, if you leave Las Vegas ~12:30 pm, it will take you ~3.5-4 hours to make the drive to Kanab, UT. At the time of year you’re visiting, Las Vegas, NV, will be on Pacific Daylight Time and Kanab, UT, will be on Mountain Daylight Time. Therefore, Kanab, UT, will be one hour “ahead” of Las Vegas, so you’ll “lose” an hour crossing the border from Nevada to Utah. You might not be able to catch the BLM office before it closes. You might be better off calling them from the road or the next morning at 435-644-1200. As to which hike you should take, time permitting, if recent weather has been the least bit wet, I’d skip Cat Stair Canyon and do the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos. The Cat Stair Canyon trail is in a wash, which could flood without warning. Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos are on higher ground where flash flooding rarely occurs. Just be sure you get to your Air B&B in Big Water by sundown, or close to it. On Day 2, where you propose to go down to the Lees Ferry area after your Antelope Canyon tour, there again, you might be cutting it fine on available daylight hours. I’d recommend hitting Horseshoe Bend right when the parking lot opens at sunrise, or perhaps after your New Wave hike. If you are checking in for your Antelope Canyon tour at 11:30 (Page time), I assume that your tour starts at noon. Antelope Canyon tours typically last ~90 minutes, which means you’ll get done at 1:30 PM. If you grab lunch in Page, AZ, that eats up another 30 minute minimum, so you’d start the 1-hour drive down to Lees Ferry at 2:00 PM at the earliest. There, you could explore the Lonely Dell Ranch Historic Area and maybe walk across Navajo Bridge . There’s also a neat balanced rock garden in that area. If you can possibly save your appetite (maybe grab a few snacks at the local Safeway or Super Wal-Mart you can eat in the car?), you might consider getting a late lunch/early dinner at one of the area’s hidden gem local restaurants, Cliff Dweller’s Lodge . They have a surprisingly sophisticated menu for a little “hole in the wall” in the middle of nowhere! Whatever you decide, start making your way back to Big Water at about 6:00 PM, no later than 6:30 (Arizona/Page time). Day 3 – Wire Pass/Buckskin Gulch require a Day Use Pass to visit, which costs $6.00 per person. You obtain these on http://www.Recreation.gov , and to my knowledge, there is no limit on these, so no need to get them way in advance, but then again, better safe than sorry. To access this area, White Pocket, or the TeePees requires traveling down the House Rock Valley Road. The HRVR is an unpaved, occasionally graded dirt track that extends from US89 between Big Water and Kanab, UT, to US89A West of Cliff Dwellers. Whatever type of vehicle you opt to rent – sedan or SUV – know that off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car outlets. The HRVR is considered off-road. While many disregard this rule and live to tell the tale, some get stuck, not only in sand or mud, but with a hefty tow bill that won’t be covered by their rental car insurance. The section from US89 to Wire Pass Trailhead is usually pretty good if recent weather has been dry, but the trip in to White Pocket can be hazardous if you’re not experienced in rigorous, technical 4-wheel driving. It would be safest to hire a guide service if you really have your heart set on seeing this area. Day 4 in Kanab sounds great! But again, remember that access to many of these areas, such as Hidden Lake , requires off-road driving, which carries a significant element of risk, as addressed above. On your way back to Las Vegas – if that happens to be where you’re ending your trip – try to hit the stunning Valley of Fire State Park. It’s just a short detour off I-15 Northeast of town, and if you skunk out on The Wave lottery, VOF has a relatively easy and beautiful trail called the Fire Wave ! I hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to process! Please don’t hesitate to contact me directly at [email protected] if you have further questions. Good luck, safe travels, Merry Christmas & Happy New Year, Alley 🙂

First of all, thank you so much for this useful information! We (5 adults) are planning to visit Page and Sedona this July. We are flying to Phoenix on 7/6, around noon. Our flight back home is 5:00AM on 7/12. I’m thinking:

7/6: Drive to Page 7/7: Antelope Canyon. Should we take a tour or without a tour? If we have to choose one, do you recommend Uppper or Lower? 7/8: Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip 7/9: Driving to Sedona. Which spot should we stop by? 7/10: Hiking/driving in Sedona. Which spots do you recommend? 7/11: Hiking/driving in Sedona. Which spots do you recommend? 7/12: Flying home. Since we have to be at the airport by 3:00AM, should we consider not booking a hotel on 7/11?

Do you recommend one extra day at Page area and shorten our stay in Sedona?

Any recommendations will be greatly appreciated!

Hi Meg! Apologies for the delay in response to your inquiry. YOur trip plan sounds pretty fun. If you didn’t change a thing, you’d have a wonderful time! A couple of minor reality checks are warranted, though. For Antelope Canyon, a guided tour is 100% required. All slot canyons near Page, AZ, are on Navajo Indian Tribal Land, so access is very strictly regulated. For more information, visit our companion site, AntelopeCanyon.AZ: How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyo n As to which branch of the canyon to tour, you won’t go wrong with either one, but if your family is relatively fit, I’d recommend Lower Antelope. It’s a longer canyon, and requires a bit more exertion in the form of stairs, ladders, minor boulder scrambling, etc. If you have your heart set on seeing those picture-postcard light beeams, however, that’s strictly an Upper Antelope Canyon phenomenon. Tours that take place during the mid-day hours (11:00 AM-1:00 PM) have the best chance of getting the full effect. On the way to Sedona, AZ, from Page, AZ, you’ll find several places worth a stop. The Cameron Trading Post is a historic Native American commerce center that is perfectly situated as a bathroom break/leg stretch. If you’re hungry, maybe enjoy breakfast/brunch in the on-site restaurant. The Navajo tacos are the bomb! Their selection of souvenirs and mementos is one of the largest in the area, whether you prefer t-shirts and postcards, or higher end curios. Just North of Flagstaff, the Wupatki/Sunset Crater Loop Drive is very scenic, and educational. These two National Monuments feature an Ancestral Puebloan complex, and a dormant volcano respectively. You might check on-site to see if the lava tube is open. From Flagstaff to Sedona , you’ll be driving through Oak Creek Canyon, which is one of the most gorgeous drives in the state! Before you hit town, you might stop off at Slide Rock State Park , a natural waterslide, and a welcome respite from the summer heat. If you don’t hit this on the way down, maybe use one of your full days in town to mark this off the list. Other attractions to visit in Sedona include, but are not limited to: – The Chapel of the Holy Cross – Tlaquepaque Shopping & Arts Village – The Pink Jeep Broken Arrow Tour – Devil’s Bridge – Cathedral Rock – Birthing Cave – Fay Canyon – Bell Rock – West Fork of Oak Creek – Boynton Canyon – Sedona Heritage Museum – Airport Mesa – Wine tastings For more suggestions, check out VisitSedona.com: Sample 2-day/3-night Itineraries On your last day, I wouldn’t recommend foregoing a hotel per se. What you might do is make a long-ish day out of the journey back to Phoenix, perhaps swing through Jerome, a ghost town-turned-artist colony with a fascinating history. From there, head back to I-17, and time/desire permitting, stop at Montezuma Castle National Monument, another Ancestral Puebloan site, but built in a very advanced method for its time. If you thought high-rise apartments were a 20th-century thing, this site proves otherwise! Before crossing the city limit line of Phoenix, maybe stop off for a celebratory slice of pie at the legendary Rock Springs Cafe in Black Canyon City. This article describes this itinerary in more detail, in reverse: Road Tripping From Phoenix to Sedona As indicated previously, I’d recommend getting some shut-eye before boarding your flight home. There are plenty of good hotels within easy access of Phoenix/Sky Harbor Airport . If, however, you’d like to save some money on lodging, you might see if your credit card rewards program offers any kind of deals on access to airport lounges. Some even allow passengers with economy class tickets to utilize them. Check out: – American Airlines Admirals Club – Multiple Locations – (2) Concourse A and (1) Concourse B. Lounge Access: Pay at the Door with proof of American Airlines ticket Lounge membership programs – Centurion Lounge – Location: Terminal 4, Airside, near Gate B22. Lounge Access: American Express® Card Members • Lounge membership programs. – Delta Sky Club – Location: Terminal 3, Airside, near Gate 8. Lounge Access: Lounge membership programs. – Escape Lounge – Location: Terminal 4, Airside, near Gate B22 – United Club is temporarily closed as they are in the process of relocating to Terminal 3. While sleeping in airports is a “do at your own risk” proposition, it can be done in the Phoenix/Sky Harbor Airport with a little foreknowledge, creativity, and apparently, some good earplugs. For more information check out: SleepingInAirports.net – Guide to Sleeping in Phoenix Airport Hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to process! Please feel free to contact me directly at [email protected] if you need further guidance. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thank you so much! I really appreciate your help and kindness. !

You are welcome – have a great time!

Hi Alley, First of all, you have the best expertise and up-to-date knowledge when it comes to touring the AZ and UT areas! I also greatly appreciate your thorough responses here. May I run by you our itinerary coming up in April? Not sure if I am packing too much in, but we like to be ambitious and efficient with our time. We are a family of 5 with 3 kiddos between 6 and 11. Anything too redundant or not worth it? Anything we are missing that we must see? Thank you so much!

Fri (Day 1) – Leave Los Angeles, stop briefly in Las Vegas to see Bellagio Conservatory and Fountains. Arrive in Page, AZ by evening. Dinner at Strombolli’s or Bonkers. Check-in to hotel at Lake Powell.

Sat (Day 2) – Morning: The Chains hike down to the river, Hanging Gardens Hike, Carl Hayden Visitor Center, Glen Canyon Dam Overlook. Lunch. 2:30pm Check in to Lower Antelope Canyon Tour. Dinner at Sunset 89.

Sun (Day 3) – 7:30am Check-in to Upper Antelope Canyon Tour. Done by 9:45am. Rim View Trail (2.5mi loop). Brunch at Canyon Crepes Cafe. 12:30pm Check-in to Navajo Canyon Boat Tour. Dinner at Jadi To’ho floating restaurant at Antelope Point Marina.

Mon (Day 4) – Checkout of Hotel. Do Horseshoe Bend hike, drive to Navajo Twin Bridges, Lees Ferry (maybe hike Catehdral Wash or Lonely Dell Ranch?). Drive to Sedona, stop at Chapel of the Holy Cross. Check-in to Sedona Hotel in Camp Verde.

Tues (Day 5) – Out of Africa Wildlife Park

Wed (Day 6) – Sunrise Balloon Ride with Northern Light Balloon Rides. Drive to Bearizona (spend 3 hours). Stay at Railway Hotel in Williams.

Thurs (Day 7) – Grand Canyon Railway Tour with Grand Tour Bus (sack lunch). (Should I cancel the tour bus and just plan our own hikes and pack lunch?!)

Fri (Day 8) – Leave AZ, drive toward Palm Springs. Do Ladder Canyon Trail, Living Desert Zoo. Overnight in a hotel.

Sat (Day 9) – Drive home to Los Angeles!

Hey Christie, Your trip looks pretty fun and very well-planned! Dare I say, though, it’s almost teetering on the brink of being over -planned. IMHO, the best memories of vacations tend to be those that come about unexpectedly, as a result of the inevitable “wow, look at that!” moment. If you end up sacrificing some of the items on your carefully curated wish list for that, don’t fret too much about it. You’ll still have a great time! With that said, let’s get after it 🙂 On Day 1, you’ve got a long drive ahead of you, somewhere along the lines of 9-10 hours. Trying to stop in Las Vegas just to see the Bellagio may be more trouble than it’s worth. Traffic is always a nightmare in that town. If you’re wanting to make a stop to break up the drive, I would recommend the stunning Valley of Fire State Park . It’s just Northeast of Las Vegas, just off I-15, so not too big a detour, and if you’re up for a little hiking to stretch the legs, the Fire Wave Trail is easy, and the scenery is gorgeous. Just be sure you have plenty of food and water with you if you take me up on this suggestion; April in the desert is already quite warm. The key is to make sure that you arrive in Page, AZ, before nightfall. Driving after dark is strongly discouraged in Northern Arizona and Southern Utah due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife or livestock can hike up your risk of a collision. Trust me, that’s not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, possibly cold (nighttime lows in some areas are still dipping down around freezing), where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive! In mid-April, sunrise in Page, AZ, occurs at 5:50 am and sunset takes place around 7:00 pm. Be sure to get an early start out of LA. On Day 2, again, a slight modification might be in order, namely, hiking to The Chains. Due to the level of Lake Powell being extremely low, the hike back up from the waterline might be too much for your 6-year-old. If you find that to be the case when you arrive (you can always look at it and judge for yourself when you arrive), a good “substitution” would be The New Wave & Radio Tower Rock . The trailhead is located near Beehive Campground on the West flank of the Glen Canyon Dam, across from the turn-out to the Lake Powell Resort. Relatively easy trail with interesting rock formations to explore. On Day 3, where you’re doing the Navajo Canyon boat tour, hopefully you’re doing that out of Antelope Point Marina instead of Lake Powell/Wahweap Marina? If you are taking the Antelope Point Marina tour, then Jadi To’ho’ is the perfect choice for dinner since it’s just a short walk from the tour boat dock. If you’re taking Lake Powell/Wahweap Marina’s tour, then Jadi might be a bit of a schlep, better to find something at the Lake Powell Resort complex or in town. On Day 4, again, sounds like a totally fun plan (although I might suggest making a change here… more on that in a minute**), just keep an eye on the time so that you’re not making the drive into Sedona in the dark. US89A through Oak Creek Canyon is very twisty, heavily forested, and dark. I’ve driven it a couple times after sunset and let’s just say I’ll never do it again! If you’re looking for a good place to have lunch in the Lees Ferry/Marble Canyon area, I highly recommend Cliff Dweller’s Lodge . Great food, amazing view! **OK, so this is where I might throw a wrench into the works. If it’s too late to change plans, I understand completely, and if you don’t, you’ll still have a great time. However, you might rethink the Grand Canyon Railway. Not that it isn’t fun — it definitely is! But it’s may not be the most efficient use of your time, and you could experience more of the Grand Canyon by making a slight modification to your itinerary. On Day 4, instead of making Sedona, AZ, your destination, plan on spending that night at Grand Canyon South Rim . Upon leaving the Lees Ferry/Marble Canyon around lunchtime, continue South down US89 through the Navajo Indian Reservation. If you didn’t do Cliff Dweller’s for lunch, the Cameron Trading Post would make for a good meal and a memorable stop. If you don’t eat there, plan on hitting it for a leg stretch/bathroom break, maybe do a little souvenir shopping. At the junction of AZ64 & US89 just South of the Trading Post, turn West on AZ 64, which will take you to Grand Canyon South Rim and Grand Canyon Village. Between Desert View Point and Grand Canyon Village, there are over half a dozen named Grand Canyon viewpoints you can stop at, all with varying features and perspectives on the canyon. You wouldn’t be able to get to any of these viewpoints utilizing the Grand Canyon Railway. I realize it may be tricky booking a room inside the park; if Grand Canyon Village is sold out, look at Tusayan, AZ, just 7 miles outside the park boundary. If you stay there, you could easily hit the excellent IMAX movie production “Grand Canyon: The Hidden Secrets ” before heading to Bearizona and Sedona. Revised trip map If you do hang onto your Grand Canyon Railway reservations, here’s a few things to keep in mind: it takes 2+ hours to make a trip that would only take you ~1 hour to do by car. You don’t actually see the Grand Canyon from the train, you won’t see it until you get to the park and get off the train. Upon arrival at Grand Canyon Village, you only have ~3.5 hours to explore. The bus tour would get you out further than you could just by making your own way, plus the fact that it includes lunch saves you the hassle of trying to get a table at one of the slammed rimside restaurants. However, by the time the bus tour ends, it’s pretty much time to get back on the train and head back to Williams (another 2+ hour ride!). This video explains the “Train Vs. Drive” debate in more detail; note the footage is kind of dated and some of the classes of service, amenities, etc., have changed in the interim, but the core principles remain the same. Again, gotta stress that if it’s too late to change plans and shuffle some reservations around, you’ll still enjoy this activity, but I can pretty much guarantee you’ll be planning a return trip when you can spend more time at the Grand Canyon, which isn’t such a bad thing 😉 Your time in Sedona sounds great, you might take the kids to Slide Rock State Park if it’s warm enough. Maybe hit Airport Mesa for sunset. Since I am not familiar with Palm Springs, I can’t really comment on the activities you propose to do there, but seeing how well-thought-out your other plans are, you’re bound to have a great day! I hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to process! If I can be of further assistance, please don’t hesitate to contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels!~ Alley 🙂

Hi Alley! Thank you so much for your detailed feedback! I studied it and made some modifications to my itinerary as a result! We leave tomorrow! I appreciate the warning about driving into AZ or Sedona in the dark. So we are leaving a day early to stop in Vegas and drive to AZ in the morning instead. My kids really love the Bellagio Conservatory and Fountains, so unfortunately, we have to fight traffic to see these each time. Haha!

Good point about the Chains. We will just drive to the vista point and look at the view instead of trying to hike down there. Thanks for the tip on New Wave/Radio Tower Rock! We will try that one out. Would you also recommend the Hanging Gardens Trail or the Rim View Trail? Which is easier for kids?

Our Navajo Canyon boat tour leaves from the Lake Powell Resort, so we will be near Lake Powell. Good point about not trying to go to Antelope Point Marina from there. So we will try Rainbow Room instead and eat at Antelope Point Marina after our Lower Antelope Canyon tour since it’s closer.

Cliff Dweller’s Lodge is too far a detour south from Lees Ferry. So we will have lunch at Cameron Trading Post instead, since that’s on the way to Sedona!

Good points about the Grand Canyon. But we decided to do the train ride after all. Our kids are learning about the American Frontier, the history of the railroads, etc. in U.S. History and so it would be neat for them to experience that (especially with the western shoot-out show and mock train robbery!). It’s a little gimmicky, but I figure the kids will enjoy it. Once they are serious teens, we will come back driving ourselves! ;P

Any eatery recommendations for both lunch and dinner in Sedona or Williams? Also, is Montezuma Castle worth a visit?

Here is our revised itinerary:

Thurs (Day 1) – Leave Los Angeles, arrive Las Vegas at night.

Fri (Day 2) – Bring kids to Bellagio Conservatory and Fountains while Dad is in a meeting. Arrive in Page, AZ in the afternoon. Dinner at Sunset 89 or Bonkers. Check-in to hotel at Best Western Plus Lake Powell.

Sat (Day 3) – Morning: Drive to see the Chains, hike New Wave/Radio Tower Rock. Carl Hayden Visitor Center, Glen Canyon Dam Overlook. Lunch. 2:30pm Check in to Lower Antelope Canyon Tour along Indn Rte 222. Dinner at Antelope Point Marina (Jadi To’oh).

Sun (Day 4) – 7:30am Check-in to Upper Antelope Canyon Tour. Done by 9:45am. Hanging Gardens Trail or Rim View Trail (2.5mi loop). Brunch at Canyon Crepes Cafe. 12:30pm Check-in to Navajo Canyon Boat Tour. Done at 4:30pm. Dinner at Rainbow Room at the Lake Powell Resort.

Mon (Day 5) – Horseshoe Bend hike, drive to Navajo Twin Bridges, Lees Ferry. Drive to Sedona, lunch at Cameron Trading Post. Visit Chapel of the Holy Cross. Check-in to Days Inn Wyndham Camp Verde.

Tues (Day 6) – Montezuma Castle?? Out of Africa Wildlife Park

Wed (Day 7) – Sunrise Balloon Ride with Northern Light Balloon Rides. Drive to Bearizona (spend 3 hours). Stay at Railway Hotel in Williams.

Thurs (Day 8) – Grand Canyon Railway Tour with Grand Tour Bus (sack lunch).

Fri (Day 9) – Explore Williams a bit more. Drive toward Palm Springs. Overnight at hotel in Blythe, CA.

Sat (Day 9) – Ladder Canyon/Painted Canyon hike (5mi). Drive home to LA!

Thank you so much! You are the best!

Hey again, Christie, That sounds really fun! Your kids (and you) will enjoy the Grand Canyon Railway if they are studying that time in history. Do plan for a return trip to the park, though, when you can give it more time. The time allotted with the Grand Canyon Railway trip (~3 hours) will only allow you to scratch the surface. Cameron Trading Post is a perfectly good choice for lunch if Cliff Dweller’s Lodge doesn’t appeal. The CTP can also be quite educational, it is a real-life Native American commerce center dating back to the late 1800’s and is still active as a trading post. If someone can take you into the gallery building, that’s where they keep some of their higher-end collectibles. To answer some of your other questions, between the Rim View Trail and the Hanging Gardens, Hanging Gardens is the easier of the two just because it’s shorter (a mile and change round trip IIRC). The Page Rim View Trail is ~10 miles in length because it encircles Manson Mesa, where the original townsite of Page, AZ, was situated. That said, it doesn’t mean you have to commit to hiking the entire trail if you don’t want to. There are several spur trails that branch off the main one that will get you back to town. The views of the lake aren’t what they used to be with the water level dipping so low. Since you have a full day to work with on Day 6, I don’t see why you couldn’t include a stop at Montezuma Castle in there. The typical visit to OOA is ~4-5 hours, then Montezuma Castle is ~10 minutes from there. On your morning in Williams, AZ, before you head to Palm Springs, you might hike to Sycamore Falls . It’s a fairly easy hike, but the trail can be muddy if you’re visiting during the spring months after the snow melts. Also, depending on the time of your visit, the falls could be just a trickle or flowing freely. Again, just depends on your timing and the whims of Mother Nature. If you prefer to keep things closer to town, stroll along the main drag through town that pays homage to its Route 66 heritage with quirky shops, classic cars, and 1940s-50s era kitsch. Hope I didn’t miss anything! If I did, please contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley! Thank you so much for your detailed feedback! I studied it and made some modifications to my itinerary as a result! I appreciate the warning about driving into AZ or Sedona in the dark. So we are leaving a day early to stop in Vegas and drive to AZ in the morning instead. My kids really love the Bellagio Conservatory and Fountains, so unfortunately, we have to fight traffic to see these each time. Haha!

Your page feels like a godsend for my upcoming task. I am currently planning a 7-day trip (3/25 – 4/1) at the Grand Canyon with some family coming from Orange County in SoCal and SF in NorCal. We’re looking to just find airbnb or cabin(s) to rent over the course of the week. We are thinking of doing a couple nights in the North Rim and explore around there toward the beginning part of the week and stop by Horseshoe Bend on our way to the South Rim toward the latter part of the week. Would you advise on planning something like this? Again, we’ll have two groups of people coming separately from southern and northern california – which we’ll want to meet up and start our time “together” sooner rather than later. Any recommendations on itinerary and area to stay would be greatly appreciated!

Hi Dee! Well, first a bit of bad news: the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is closed until May 15th, so your plan to “spend a couple of nights there” is not going to happen this time around. What you can do is visit Zion and Bryce Canyon instead. More on that in a minute… With two groups converging from Orange County and SF, you have some interesting but not insurmountable challenges. The group from SF will want to get on the road first if at all possible since they’ll have a longer distance to cover at the beginning (and end) of their trip. If they’re OK with doing one long drive on that first day, you guys could meet up in Las Vegas, NV. Map After a night and/or day in Las Vegas, make your way together toward Kanab, UT, ~a 4-hour drive from Las Vegas. An optional detour that’s very worthwhile is the beautiful Valley of Fire State Park , a short distance Northeast of town. Book a VRBO or Air B & B in that area for at least 3 days so you can have two days to explore Zion National Park, then one day to visit Bryce Canyon. For Zion, you’ll need to utilize the Zion Canyon Shuttle to access the main sightseeing area of the park. You catch that out of Springdale, UT, ~1 hour’s drive from Kanab. On your 2nd day, you could return to the same area to hit sights of interest you might have missed, or use that day to visit the Kolob Canyon s area of the park, which is less crowded, so no need to mess with a shuttle. Kolob Canyon is ~90 minutes, each way, from Kanab, UT. On your 3rd day, visit Bryce Canyon (also ~90 minutes [one way] from Kanab). You can self-drive the scenic loop or take one of several easy but stunning hikes . Know that anything you plan for Bryce will be on a weather permitting basis. At 8,000′ above sea level, it could easily snow up there. Make your way toward Page, AZ, ~1 hour from Page, AZ, to visit Horseshoe Bend and possibly tour Antelope Canyon , then start heading toward Grand Canyon South Rim. Trip map Now, here is where things might get a bit complicated: the nearest VRBO / Air B&B type properties to Grand Canyon South Rim will actually be outside the park, in communities such as Williams (~60 miles South of the park) or Flagstaff (~90 minutes Southeast of the park). There are a couple of properties in Grand Canyon Junction, aka Valle, AZ, ~30 minutes South of the park, but those book up pretty quick; I imagine they’re already sold out for your desired dates since that’s the Spring Break holiday. Depending on when you finish your activities in Page, AZ, you might simply head directly to your accommodations for that evening and do your Grand Canyon sightseeing on the following days. The key is to avoid driving at night after sunset in this part of the U.S. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in Northern Arizona and Southern Utah due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife or livestock can hike up your risk of a collision. Trust me, that’s not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold (nighttime lows in some areas are still dipping down below freezing), where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive! At the time of year you’re visiting, sunrise in Arizona takes place at 6:15 am and sunset occurs at 6:45 pm. Utah will one hour ahead due to Daylight Saving Time — Utah observes it, Arizona doesn’t — so be sure to factor that into your touring days in Bryce and Zion. If you end up staying at a cabin or cabins in Williams or Flagstaff, again, you can utilize two full days of sightseeing at the park, or take one day at the Grand Canyon, and another day exploring the more immediate area around your accommodations, maybe even take a day trip to Sedona? On your departure day, the two groups could stick together as far as Barstow, CA. The Northbound contingent would then be on their own all the way to SF. It would take the Orange County group ~7 hours to make it home from Williams, AZ. The SF group might want overnight in Barstow, CA, before continuing home. Trip map I hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to process. Please contact me directly at [email protected] if I can be of further assistance! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

I am planning a trip from Los Angeles for about 1 week starting 3/25/22 and possibly returning back either the 31st or the 1st. Would you please tell me which places i should visit and what areas i should stay overnight? I am open to exploring and seeing what Arizona has to offer. I definitely would love to see hourseshoe bend and antelope canyon if it is open, but would love to explore much more including Sedona. Would you please advise on what i should do on my trip? i’d really appreciate it.

Hi Tina, Driving over from LA, you need to be prepared for long drives, both at the beginning and end of your trip. If you were to drive from LA to Zion at the beginning of your trip, that would take you ~7-8 hours. Ditto for the trip from Sedona-LA at the end of the trip. I like to advise folks to hit Sedona as the last stop on their trip, not only because it’s beautiful, but it’s very conducive to just relaxing and “chilling.” One disadvantage – if you can call it that – is that Sedona is a huge and beautiful area with a lot to see and do. It really deserves at least 3-4 days to fully enjoy and explore. If that’s not possible this time around, a quick 1-day visit is by no means a waste of time, but I can pretty much guarantee that you’ll be planning a return trip the minute you cross the city limit line! Another thing to keep in mind is that the timeframe of late March-early April is within the transitional period between winter and spring in Northern Arizona and Southern Utah. While weather for the most part is sunny and pleasantly cool, a late-season snowstorm could pass through without much warning. Start monitoring local weather about 2 weeks before you get set to travel. At least a jacket and gloves should be packed for high-altitude areas like the Grand Canyon and Bryce. With your details provided in mind, you could do something like this: 03/25 – Drive from LA to Zion National Park (~7-8 hours), overnight in Springdale, UT 03/26 – Take Zion Canyon Shuttle into the park to explore the main sightseeing area and popular trails, 2nd night in Springdale 03/27 – Drive to Bryce Canyon (~3 hours), overnight in Bryce Canyon area 03/28 – Drive to Page, AZ (~2.5-3.5 hours), optional stop to hike Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos trail , afternoon tour of Antelope Canyon , overnight in Page, AZ 03/29 – Drive to Grand Canyon South Rim, visit Horseshoe Bend on the way out of town, stop at Cameron Trading Post for lunch/dinner, and Grand Canyon viewpoints between Desert View and Grand Canyon Village. Total drive time factoring in stops ~3.5-4 hours. Overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim , either in the park or Tusayan, AZ. 03/30 – Drive to Sedona, AZ (~3 hours), optional stop in Tusayan, AZ to see IMAX movie presentation “ Grand Canyon: The Hidden Secrets ” or take a Grand Canyon Helicopter Tour , overnight in Sedona 03/31 – 2nd day/night in Sedona, take Pink Jeep Broken Arrow Tour or visit popular landmarks in that area, such as the Chapel of the Holy Cross , Tlaquepaque , downtown area 04/01 – Drive back to LA (~8 hours) Custom trip map I hope that helps you get started, if you need further guidance, please contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Would you be able to help me plan an itinerary. Thinking of flying into Phoenix.

Want to see Scottsdale, Sedona, Page and Monument valley/Lake Powell area. Thinking 10 days total. What do you think?

Hey Vishal, That sounds doable in 10 days 🙂 One thing I must ask, however, is have you been to the Grand Canyon yet? If not, you should definitely make room for it in your itinerary! The South Rim is the most recommended for first-time visitors since it has the most in the way of visitor services (hotels, restaurants, etc.) and is most easily accessible from major cities such as Phoenix, Las Vegas, LA, etc. With 10 days to work with, here is what I’d recommend: Day 1 – Fly into Phoenix, overnight in Phoenix Day 2 – Drive to Monument Valley, ~5.5 hour drive, overnight in Monument Valley Day 3 – Early AM Backcountry tour of Monument Valley , then drive to Page, AZ (~2.5 hour drive), visit Horseshoe Bend, overnight in Page Day 4 – Early AM tour of Antelope Canyon , then drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~3-3.5 hours factoring in stops on the East Rim between Desert View Point and Grand Canyon Village), overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim Day 5 – 2nd day/night at Grand Canyon South Rim, ride shuttles to viewpoints on the West Rim/Hermit’s Rest road Day 6 – Drive to Sedona (~3 hours), 1st of 3 nights in Sedona Day 7 – Pink Jeep Broken Arrow Tour, Chapel of the Holy Cross, Tlaquepaque, Airport Mesa for sunset Day 8 – More sightseeing in Sedona, Fay Canyon, Bell Rock, West Fork of Oak Creek Canyon Day 9 – Drive to Scottsdale (~2 hours), visit Old Town area, Desert Botanical Garden, Taliesin West, overnight in Scottsdale Day 10 – Fly home Custom trip map Note that I suggested a guided tour of Monument Valley although self-driving the scenic loop drive is permitted with the advance purchase of an entrance ticket. Should both guided tours and self-drive tickets be booked up for the time you travel, it is possible to visit Monument Valley as a day trip from Page, AZ . Hope that helps. If you have further questions, please contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travel, Alley 🙂

This information is truly amazing! I’m wanting to plan a great trip for my husband and I as e we recently got married and haven’t been able to go on our honeymoon. We’d be traveling from Orlando. Do you think it’s best we travel into Vegas and rent a car? I’m thinking about a 5 day trip and would love to see antelope canyon and the Grand Canyon but have 0 clue how to plan this. Any tips or suggestions?

Hi Delaney, and congratulations on your recent nuptials! Coming in from Orlando, flying into Las Vegas and renting a car is definitely the best way to go. You might also use Phoenix, AZ, as your staging city, or… fly into Las Vegas and out of Phoenix. The last suggestion would depend on whether one-way car drop-off fees were prohibitively high, it can often depend on your travel dates and other factors. You could do something like this: Day 1 – Fly to Las Vegas, drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~4.5 hour drive), overnight at the South Rim Day 2 – Drive to Page (~3.5-4 hours, factoring in the stops you’ll invariably make on the East Rim/Desert View Drive), visit Horseshoe Bend, overnight in Page, AZ Day 3 – Tour Antelope Canyon first thing in the morning, then drive to Sedona, AZ (~3 hours), overnight in Sedona Day 4 – 2nd day/night in Sedona, maybe take Pink Jeep Broken Arrow Tour ? Day 5 – Chill day or drive to Phoenix (~2 hours), fly home Custom Trip Map If you opt to drive back to Las Vegas instead, that’s ~4.5 hours from Sedona. Note that I placed Sedona on the back half of your trip because it makes for a nice place to decompress and relax before you have to get back to reality LOL If hotel availability (or lack thereof) dictates, you may have to be prepared to flip-flop this itinerary. Also, if you can possibly free up a couple more days, you won’t regret doing so as that will open up more possibilities of places to go and things to see and do! For suggestions, check out the Ultimate 7-Day Itinerary in Northern AZ & Southern UT on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ Hope that helps! If you need further guidance, please contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi… really helpful to read all of your insightful suggestions. There’s so much to see!!

We’re traveling to Page from Bryce/Hatch in June. Leaving early in the morning (around 7) to hopefully arrive in Page around 930-10. Google maps says 2 hrs but I’m nervous it may take us longer.

In your opinion: do you think we’ll have time to see horseshoe bend, lower antelope canyon and a canyon kayak trip all in one day?!!

We will be leaving the next morning to head to Monument Valley and then on to Grand Canyon. I would love to do a Monument Valley tour (~2hrs) OR do you think we can see a sufficient amt without doing the guided tour?

Thank you for your time!!

Hey Beth, Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you won’t have time to visit Horseshoe Bend, tour Lower Antelope Canyon, and do a kayak trip in one day. Since you’re going to Monument Valley, you might consider sliding your Lower Antelope Canyon tour to that travel day, take a tour first thing in the morning. I highly recommend a guided tour of Monument Valley because 1., the road through the most scenic part of the Valley is unpaved and if you’re in a rental car, you’ll void your insurance policy the minute your tires part with the pavement. Secondly, a tour with a Navajo guide will be a more educational and memorable experience IMO. RE: the drive from Bryce Canyon and/or Hatch, UT, to Page, don’t be surprised if it does take longer because it’s a very scenic drive and you will be stopping to take pictures more often than you realize. Plus, you have an opportunity to take a nice little hike to the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos . The trailhead is located between Kanab, UT, and Page, AZ at mile marker 19 on US89. Bear in mind that June is one of the hottest times of year in Northern Arizona and Southern Utah, so any labor-intensive activities should be undertaken during the early morning hours to enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. In July, sunrise in Arizona occurs around 5:00 am and sunset takes place at approximately 8:00 pm. During the summer months, Utah is one hour ahead of Arizona, so scoot those times 1 hour forward for Utah. Reservations should be made ASAP for hotels and guided tours (which are required for Antelope Canyon). Last but not least, we don’t recommend driving at all after sunset in this part of the US. This is due to the fact that local roads are very dimly lit and deer, elk, and other wildlife tend to mill around at night, which hikes up your risk of an auto accident. That’s not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that is pitch black, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. If you require further guidance, please contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels, Alley http://antelopecanyon.az http://thewaveaz.com http://antelopecanyonboattours.com http://alstrompoint.com http://towerbutte.com http://canyonskywalk.com

So much to see! So happy I discovered your wealth of information. Looking for guidance, if you would.

Husband an I scored one of the cabins on the rim of Grand Canyon May 20-22, 2022! That’s as far ahead as we are totally committed too. Of course we want to see everything. But give our age and not having the same stamina we did 20 years ago, looking for suggestions.

Haven’t booked our flights, but planning into and out of LAS, and renting a car. We are thinking of arriving the 15 or 16, leaving 8-10 days later.

Things we are thinking of, but not totally committed to: LAS/Ring of Fire/Hoover dam Page Antelope Valley/Horseshoe Bend (thinking the pontoon trip) Grand Canyon

Tribal lands Monument Valley Bryce/Zion Moab?

I know if we drove hours everyday, we might be able to see it all, but that’s not what we want to do. I like the idea of the 2 nights at GC and 2 nights in Page, and then 1 or 2 nights at different stops along the way. Anything listed after the GC, Page area would be nice but not necessarily a must.

We also don’t mind backtracking if we need to, or we could go to LAS the 17 or 18 and make the GC one of our first stops.

So easy to get lost in the possibilities, thank you for sharing your knowledge!

Hi Danette, Congrats on scoring that cabin at the Grand Canyon, I’m assuming that’s at the South Rim? One little piece of bad news, though, with the time you have, you won’t have enough time to visit Moab, UT, and do the area justice. You really need 3-4 days to fully enjoy and explore that area, even without any labor-intensive hiking. With that in mind, here’s what I’d recommend: May 14th: Arrive in Las Vegas, overnight in Las Vegas May 15th: Start early, drive to Zion National Park (~3.5 hours) with a stop at Valley of Fire State Park — you definitely want to get that done first thing in the morning because late May is HOT in the desert, overnight in Springdale, UT, or Hurricane, UT May 16th: Take Zion Canyon Shuttle to the main sightseeing area of the park, easy but scenic hiking available in that area such as the Riverside Walk and Emerald Pools, 2nd night in Springdale or Hurricane May 17th: Drive to Bryce Canyon (~2 hours), hike Queen’s Garden/Navajo Loop Trail if desired, overnight in Bryce Canyon area May 18th: Drive to Page, AZ (~3 hours), good hike en route is the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos, overnight in Page May 19th: 2nd day/night in Page, AZ, do the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip, visit Horseshoe Bend that evening, or first thing in the AM on the way to the Grand Canyon May 20-22nd: Grand Canyon! The drive from Page, AZ, will realistically take ~3.5 hours because it’s a very scenic drive and there are over half a dozen named Grand Canyon viewpoints between Desert View Point and Grand Canyon Village. May 21st: Full day at Grand Canyon — concentrate sightseeing on Grand Canyon Village Historic District and the Hermit’s Rest Road, which you an see with the free shuttles that run during peak season May 22nd: check out of Grand Canyon, drive to Las Vegas (~5 hours), stop at Hoover Dam on the way there. Overnight in Vegas again, or fly home You might have noticed at this point that I’ve also taken Monument Valley off the table. Not that it isn’t beautiful and worthwhile, it definitely is! But you’d need to add another day or two to your trip time, maybe arrive in Las Vegas a little earlier? Another thing you may not realize is, even if you don’t go to Monument Valley on this trip, you’ll be passing through Indian Lands several times, namely, between Page, AZ, and Grand Canyon South Rim. That is Navajo Indian Tribal Land, and you can even stop at two active trading posts, the Gap Trading Post and the Cameron Trading Post . The latter has a wonderful restaurant on-site, the specialty of the house is the Navajo Taco! You could also, as you indicate, scoot your arrival into LAS back a few days and hit the Grand Canyon first, then Page, Monument Valley, Bryce, Zion (in a 10-day trip). For more suggestions, check out this piece on our companion site, AntelopeCanyon.AZ: The Ultimate 7-Day Itinerary in Northern Arizona & Southern Utah Trip Map I hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to process. If you need further assistance, please contact me directly at [email protected] Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays! Alley 🙂 http://horseshoebend.com http://antelopecanyon.az http://thewaveaz.com http://antelopecanyonboattours.com http://alstrompoint.com http://towerbutte.com http://canyonskywalk.com

❤️❤️❤️ Thank you! I’ll study this in depth and plan from there. Appreciate you taking our time into consideration. We want to enjoy our trip, and not just be in the car.

If we book through any of these sights, should we mention your name! I hope you get a bit of commission for what you do. It is truly invaluable!

Hello Alley, I’m planning to visit Page on Dec 3-5 . We will arrive Friday afternoon from California. I already booked the Antelope Canyon tour for 10:00am on Dec. 4. Would you recommend I still go to Horseshoe bend that day or wait til following. It’s my daughters 16th birthday and she wanted to do a road trip with just me and her. Want to make it as memorable as possible. Thank you

Hi David, Happy birthday to your daughter! I’m sure you will have a wonderful time in Page, AZ. As for when you hit Horseshoe Bend, it’s pretty much up to you. The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, 7 days a week. At the time of year you’re visiting, sunrise occurs at 7:20 am and sunset takes place at 5:10 pm. You should allot 90 minutes to 2 hours to park, walk to the rim (self-guided), take some photos, then walk back to your vehicle. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

I am driving from Las Vegas to Page next Friday. I have a reservation to tour the Upper Antelope Canyon at 2 on Saturday. On Monday, I am flying back out of Phoenix. I want to make the most of my trip and hopefully fit in water rafting in Horseshoe Bend. How do you recommend I plan the trip? What stops should I make from Vegas to Page? I traveled to the Grand Canyon earlier this year, and your recommendations were very helpful!! Thank you!!

Hi again, Angela! Glad our suggestions helped you get the most out of your Grand Canyon visit. For your trip to Page, AZ, you can do the same by getting an early start on the drive out of Las Vegas, NV, and making the short detour through the stunning Valley of Fire State Park , just Northeast of town. You can do a quick drive-through on a convenient loop drive, or take the time to stop and enjoy a little hiking, such as the Fire Wave Trail . Another worthwhile stop is Pipe Springs National Monument , near Fredonia, AZ, which provides a very educational glimpse into the lives and struggles of the first Native American and European residents of the area. Time/desire permitting, between Kanab, UT, and Page, AZ, is yet another beautiful and relatively easy hiking trail, the Paria Rimrocks and Toadstool Hoodoos . There’s no shortage of ways to extend what is normally a 5-hour drive, but one thing to keep in mind is that you need to make sure you arrive in Page, AZ, before sunset. If I didn’t mention it when I advised you about visiting Grand Canyon, nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit. The possible presence of deer, elk, other wildlife, and livestock animals can also elevate your risk of a collision. Trust me, that’s not something you want to experience in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, cold (nighttime temps are starting to get chilly in mid-October), where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. At the time of your visit, sunrise occurs at around 6:30 AM and sunset takes place just before 6:00 PM. Since your Antelope Canyon tour on Saturday takes place at 2:00 PM, that gives you some time to enjoy some local attractions such as Horseshoe Bend, the Glen Canyon Dam & Steel Arch Bridge, the Hanging Gardens Trail, and the “New” Wave, just to name a few. In October, the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip is offered once daily. Check-in is at 9:30 am, start time is 10:30 am, and the trip wraps up around 3:00 pm. You’ll need to schedule this activity for Sunday in light of what you already have reserved. The drive from Page, AZ, to Phoenix is also ~5 hours. Depending on what time your flight leaves, you might save your appetite for breakfast at the Cameron Trading Post on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Time and energy permitting, another opportunity to extend the trip a little comes in at the Wupatki/Sunset Crater National Monuments , just North of Flagstaff. Highlights of this scenic loop drive are an Ancestral Puebloan complex and a dormant volcano respectively. This will add ~2 hours onto your drive time. As before, I wish you good luck and safe travels! If you have further questions, please contact me directly at [email protected] Alley 🙂

I’m planning a trip to Arizona from Los Angeles. I will be in Arizona 3 or 4 full days. Would you please recommend an itinerary such as places to see and stay the night.

Would greatly appreciate it.

Hi Tina, Apologies for the delay in response to your inquiry. First off, if you haven’t been to the Grand Canyon, you should definitely prioritize it over everything else out here. The drive from LA, depending on what part of LA you’re in, typically takes anywhere from 8-10 hours, so Las Vegas, NV, would be a good place to break up the drive. The trip from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, can take anywhere from 2.5-4 hours depending on how many stops you make. There are ample photo opportunities at numerous viewpoints on the East Rim of the Grand Canyon, the Navajo Reservation, and Horseshoe Bend on the way into town. Antelope Canyon is a definite must when visiting Page, AZ, and reservations are required for a guided tour to visit this area. The drive back to LA would then be another 8-10 hours, so again, Las Vegas, NV, could be your stopover point, or you might swing up through Death Valley National Park depending on what time of year you’re visiting. Custom Trip Map As for where to stay, at the Grand Canyon, inside the park is always most desirable. If lodging in that area is booked up, then Tusayan, AZ, 7 miles South of the park, is your next best option. Grand Canyon Hotels For Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon, Page, AZ, would be where you want to seek out lodging. The town has ample choices of chain and independent hotels , as well as vacation rental homes . As you can see, 3-4 days isn’t much time at all to spend in Northern Arizona or Southern Utah. If that’s all the time you truly have this time around, I can pretty much guarantee you’ll be planning a return trip when you can give this beautiful area a week’s time, or more ! I hope that helps, please contact me directly at [email protected] if I can be of further assistance. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

I love Utah. I’m very impressed by your knowledge of the area and the detailed recommendation you provided to people; thus, I wonder if you can please help me with my upcoming trip. I’ll come from San Francisco and will visit Utah from late Sept to early Oct., total 9-10 days. These are the places in my mind: Narrow at Zion, Queen’s/Navajo Combination Loop at Bryce, New Wave, and Antelope Canyon. I wonder if you can please help me to create my itinerary and recommend other places along the way. Thank you very much!

Hi D K, Late September-early October is a great time to be here! If you’re planning this as a road trip, you’ll need to allow two days bare minimum, each way, to travel from San Francisco to Utah. You’ll also be looking at some long drives on either end. If my assumption is correct, you could do something like this: Day 1: Drive from San Francisco, CA, to Las Vegas, NV (~9 hour drive), overnight in Las Vegas Day 2: Drive to Page, AZ. Optional detours: Valley of Fire State Park Northeast of Las Vegas, Marble Canyon and Lees Ferry Southwest of Page, AZ; visit Horseshoe Bend on the way into town, overnight in Page, AZ. *Drive time from Las Vegas, NV, to Page, AZ, without stopping, is approximately 5 hours. If you take us up on the suggested stops, this will add to your trip time, but the scenery is well worth it! Day 3: Tour Antelope Canyon , hike New Wave, 2nd night in Page, AZ Day 4: Drive to Bryce Canyon, optional detour: Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail (between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT), hike Queens Garden/Navajo Loop Trail at Bryce, overnight in Bryce Canyon area. Drive time from Page, AZ, to Bryce Canyon is ~2.5 hours driving direct. Day 5: Drive from Bryce Canyon to Springdale, UT (~2 hours), easy sightseeing in Zion, overnight in Springdale, UT Day 6: 2nd day/night in Zion to hike The Narrows: rent gear for hiking The Narrows , take Zion Canyon Shuttle into the park , hike Narrows, take Zion Canyon Shuttle back to Springdale, UT, overnight Day 7: Drive from Springdale, UT, to Tonopah, NV , optional stops: Snow Canyon State Park , Western Sky Warbird Museum in St. George , overnight in Tonopah . Direct drive time: 6 hours Day 8: Drive from Tonopah, NV, to Yosemite National Park, CA, overnight in Yosemite area . Direct drive time: ~4 hours, contingent on Tioga Pass remaining open . Day 9: Drive back to SF (~3.5-4) hours from Yosemite Custom Trip Map Hope that helps! Whatever you decide, be sure to book all lodging and guided tours ASAP. If you have further questions, feel free to reach out to me directly at [email protected] Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

There is so much to do and SO little time 🙂 We’d love to kayak, see horse bend, and the grand canyon. We will only be here from April 22-24th. How would you recommend getting everything in? We are staying in Phoneix on the evening of the 21st.

Thanks! Danielle

Hi Danielle, You have summed up the biggest challenge of traveling in this area to a “T.” Unfortunately, a 3-day weekend is not nearly enough time to fully enjoy and explore this area, but in this case, it’ll have to do. Another issue complicating matters is the closure of a critical component of the shortest route from Horseshoe Bend to Grand Canyon South Rim due to COVID-19. This necessitates a rather long detour through Flagstaff, AZ, to get from one place to the other, turning what used to be a 3-hour drive into more like a 5-hour drive . The order in which you visit the attractions on your “wish list” will depend largely on room availability in Page, AZ, and Grand Canyon, AZ. Kayaking on Lake Powell is best done during the earlier morning hours for lack of wind and less “chop” from large boat traffic. Here’s what I’d suggest: April 22: drive from Phoenix, AZ, to Page, AZ (~5 hours), visit Horseshoe Bend, overnight in Page, AZ April 23: Antelope Canyon kayak tour , drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~5 hours), overnight at Grand Canyon April 24th: drive back to Phoenix If necessary, you could also reverse the order of this itinerary, but that would mean doing a kayak tour in the afternoon, which is less than ideal. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi! Do you know if the roads are still closed connecting the south rim to page? We’ll be traveling in a few weeks and was hoping they’d be opened back up.

Hi Erica, I’m happy to inform you that all roads between Grand Canyon South Rim and Page, AZ, are open and passable. AZ64 between Desert View and Cameron reopened back in March IIRC. Another great piece of news? The Antelope Canyons will be back open to tours effective Monday July 12th! Because the tour operators are expected to operate at half capacity to facilitate social distancing, booking in advance is more important than ever . For more information, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi, We are planning to visit on the 6-7th of April, is your tour package available? How about antelope canyon, are they open on those dates? What other alternatives can you give me for our visit? BTW it is just for two persons. Thanks

Hey Frances, Not sure what “tour package” you are referring to, but if you’re talking about Antelope Canyon, unfortunately are still closed, and we have no idea when they might reopen. It is possible, however, to kayak into the waterside portion of Antelope Canyon on Lake Powell, then hike into the portion of the canyon on Federal and not Tribal land. There are several companies offering this tour, the one we’re most familiar with is Hidden Canyon Kayak Tours . Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

We’re planning a trip to scottsdale late april. We were thinking of the following:

4/21 – travel day 4/22 – kayak to lower antelope canyon 4/22 – horseshoe bend hike 4/22 pm – fly to phoenix and spend the weekend

is that too little?

Hey John! The Antelope Canyon kayak tour and the hike to Horseshoe Bend will take up a good part of your day. Should you will have some extra time on your hands, it can easily be filled by: : – Page Rim View Trail – Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge – Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains – Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook – Grand View Overlook Park – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock – Gunfighter Canyon – Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time) If you have the time/inclination to venture a short distance into Utah, you might also enjoy: – Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum – Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail The drive from PHX/Scottsdale to Page, AZ, takes approximately 4.5 hours. If you get an early start on either of your travel days, you might take advantage of the opportunity to visit Wupatki & Sunset Crater. These two National Monuments, which highlight an Ancestral Puebloan complex and a dormant volcano respectively, are connected by a scenic loop drive , just North of Flagstaff, AZ. Should you take us up on this suggestion, it will add another 2 hours or so onto your drive time. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thank you for all of your insight. I need some help. I will be traveling all across the mid west with 3 children in June and July. For the most part we are car camping (with electric hook ups). I am stuck in planning part of my trip. As of now I plan to leave Denver on June 26 This is what I had planned but it doesn’t seem cohesive to me: June 26- Depart Denver drive to Colorado National Monument 4 hours (I’m not sure that this is the best use of our time) June 27- Depart Co NM drive to Page, AZ 6 hours realistically would get there around 3 pm June 28- Page, AZ June 29- Depart Page drive to Grand Canyon South Rim 3 hours — no idea where to stay June 30 Grand Canyon July 1- Depart Grand Canyon and continue planned route

Can you help me best plan those days? I am not set on stopping anywhere in particular except horseshoe bend

Also, do you have recommendations on where I should stay? Particular RV Park?

Thanks SO much!

Hi Sharon! Your itinerary looks pretty fun, and Colorado National Monument is beautiful, but I would actually recommend going all the way to Moab, UT, that first night. That will be ~a 6-7 hour drive, and the advantage of going there is that you’ll have a bigger selection of RV parks to stay at (by prior reservation). While I have not RV camped in the Moab, UT , area myself, I can tell you that you’ll want to stay at a campground with electrical hook-ups. The time of year you’re traveling is going to be hot, and you’ll want access to reliable air conditioning during your stay, otherwise, you’ll have a very uncomfortable night’s sleep sweltering in what is essentially a tin can sitting in the sun. If possible, see if you can squeeze another day into your itinerary so you can spend a 2nd full day and night in the Moab, UT, area. You’ll be grateful for that time to explore Arches & Canyonlands National Parks, and maybe take a half-day white water rafting trip (as long as your kids are at least 5YO) or backcountry jeep tour . The trip to Page, AZ, the following day would be ~5 hours. It’s a beautiful drive that will take you through similar scenery to Colorado NM, as well as the opportunity to pass through Monument Valley. Developed RV parks in this area are the Page/Lake Powell Campground, which is conveniently located to the Antelope Canyons and Horseshoe Bend. There is also the Wahweap Campground, inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which would require payment of a $30/vehicle entry fee in addition to your overnight camping fee. The America the Beautiful Pass would take care of your park entrance fee, should you have one or decide to get one. Visit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise (5:00 AM) on your way to Grand Canyon South Rim the following morning so you can enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. At Grand Canyon South Rim, your choice of RV parks with electrical hook-ups are Trailer Village inside the park, or Grand Canyon Camper Village in Tusayan, AZ, ~7 miles outside the park. If neither of those campgrounds have availability, your next best choices would be Williams, AZ, ~1 hour South of Grand Canyon, or Flagstaff, AZ, ~90 minutes away. Here you can scoot by with just 1 night at Grand Canyon South Rim because a majority of your sightseeing will occur on the drive in along the Desert View/East Rim Drive, provided this section of the highway is open at the time you visit. It is currently closed due to COVID-19, but is scheduled to reopen to through traffic on May 21st. At present, Google map defaults you to the required detour through Flagstaff. Hopefully, this won’t be a factor by the time you arrive! So your revised itinerary would break down like so: June 26th: Depart Denver, CO, for Moab, UT (~6-7 hours), overnight in Moab June 27th: Full day/night in Moab, UT, white water rafting or jeep tour, explore Arches/Canyonlands June 28th: Drive to Page, AZ, via Monument Valley (~5-6 hour drive), overnight in Page, AZ June 29th: Tour Antelope Canyon , sightseeing in Page, AZ, area (Glen Canyon Dam, Page Rim View Trail, Grandview Overlook Park, White House Overlook, New Wave and Radio Tower Rock), 2nd night in Page, AZ (or drive to GC) June 30th: Visit Horseshoe Bend at sunrise, then drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~3-4 hour drive), overnight at Grand Canyon July 1st: Depart Grand Canyon, continue on trip Custom trip map Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley Your knowledge of the southwest is astounding and I am hoping that you are able to help with a multi park experience. I am beginning my trip in Sedona and I would like to visit the following places for great hiking, and southwest red rock beauty. Here is my wish list. Can you let me know if all of this is feasible in 6 days, excluding my stay in Sedona. Start road trip May 3. I also am not sure of the best place to fly in and out of based on the places on my list.

South Rim Antelope Canyon Horseshoe Bend Bryce Zion Valley of fire-this looks spectacular , not sure if feasible.

Thank you for your guidance Ellen

Hi Ellen, and thanks for your compliments, I really appreciate them! With 6 full days to work with, not including Sedona (and I hope you’ve planned for at least 3 days there — you’ll want to spend at least that much time there, trust me!), you should be able to tick off all the items on your wish list. I would recommend using Las Vegas, NV, as your staging city. Assuming that your stay in Sedona, AZ, is the first planned stop on your tour, here’s what I’d recommend: May 3rd: Drive from Sedona, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim (~3 hours). If possible, take the route that goes through the San Francisco Peaks, US180 to AZ64. That’s a very scenic drive. You might stop at the Planes of Fame Museum in Valle, AZ, ~30 miles from the park. Overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim May 4th: Sunrise at Grand Canyon South Rim, then drive to Page, AZ ***normally, this is approximately a 3-hour drive, but due to the closure of a critical component of the shortest travel route due to COVID-19, you’ll have to detour back through Flagstaff, then up North via US89; this has resulted in the drive time being more along the lines of 5 hours*** stop at Horseshoe Bend on the way into town, overnight in Page, AZ May 5th: 2nd day in Page, AZ – tour Antelope Canyon with Navajo guide, if the canyons have reopened by then . If they have not, then take kayak tour into the waterside of Antelope Canyon , then hike a short distance into the landside portion which is on Federal Land. Spend 2nd night in Page, AZ, or in afternoon, drive to Bryce Canyon (~2.5 hours from Page), overnight in Bryce Canyon area. May 6th: Sightseeing in Bryce Canyon; Fairyland or Peek-A-Boo Loop, Queen’s Garden Trail, or Navajo Trail, depending on ability/interest. Best Hikes in Bryce Canyon , spend 2nd night in Bryce, or drive to Zion National Park that afternoon (~2 hours from Bryce), overnight in Springdale, UT. May 7th: Full day in Zion National Park – you will have to ride the Zion Canyon Shuttle to access the main sightseeing areas; advance ticket purchase may be required. Best hikes: Upper Emerald Pools, Weeping Rock Trail, Riverside Walk. If you’re really ambitious and in really good shape, consider doing Angel’s Landing, and/or the Narrows . Do a little research before committing to the latter two, though. May 8th: Drive back to Las Vegas, with detour through Valley of Fire (~5-6 hour drive), overnight in Las Vegas, or take a late flight home. Trip map If needed, you can also flip-flop this itinerary if you find that room availability (or lack thereof) dictates doing so. If you have extra time to work with, give that to either Grand Canyon South Rim or Zion. I hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to digest! Feel free to contact me at [email protected] if I can be of further assistance. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

We are going to Utah NP’s, North Rim Grand Canyon and Page in May. (Staying at Kaibab Camper Village). Which slot canyon is the best alternative to antelope canyon? Also what other attractions should be at the top of the list since there is so much?? I have white pockets, horseshoe bend, buckskin gulch, coyote’s butte, the wave, grand staircase, rainbow bridge, Virmilion Cliffs and I’m sure much more…….

Hey Lizz! We are crossing our fingers and toes that by May, the Antelope Canyons will reopen. In the event they are not, the best alternatives are Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch, and Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon. Red Canyon (Peek-A-Boo) near Kanab, UT, is a beautiful slot canyon with twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons in a short but memorable walk offering up classic slot canyon scenery, and some unique geological features. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you take one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is not difficult, the drive to get there is. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. Even then, experienced drivers get stuck out there on a daily basis. If you’re in a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. There are several reputable companies in Kanab, UT, that can get you to Peek-A-Boo Canyon, including: – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net If you’d prefer something a bit more rugged, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. After paying your self-permitting fee at a well-marked kiosk, the walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, through deep sand. An 8-10’ makeshift ladder a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road, which is unpaved. While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should automatically think twice about attempting this road. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include: – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com Some other observations: The Wave probably won’t happen for you. This unforgettable sight is in a specially managed area called Coyote Buttes North, and access is granted via a highly-competitive permit process. Although the daily hiker quota has been increased to 64 per day (up from a paltry 20), what with hundreds, sometimes thousands of people competing for permits, this reduces your odds to maybe 1 in 10, optimistically speaking. How To Apply For A Wave Permit White Pocket, which some dare say is even more beautiful than The Wave, would make for a good “Plan B” in the likely event that The Wave doesn’t work out. A guided tour is recommended to visit that area as well. While the hiking is not difficult, the access road to get out there can be quite treacherous. Guided Tours to White Pocket Regarding Rainbow Bridge, this is another attraction that’s potentially hard to reach. There is no road access (nothing paved, anyway), so the most popular way to get there is by boat tour. Guided boat tours to Rainbow Bridge depart from Lake Powell Resort and take anywhere from 6-9 hours depending on the water level of Lake Powell. This year, the water level is expected to be quite low, so a round-trip walk of 3-4 miles from the boat dock will be required to actually see the Bridge. This year, boat tours were suspended due to COVID-19. Should that be the case at the time you visit, or you decide that the boat tour won’t be the best option for your party, another way to see Rainbow Bridge without breaking a sweat is to fly over it. Fixed-wing airplanes depart daily, weather permitting and contingent on a certain number of passengers booked, from the Page Municipal Airport. Rainbow Bridge Air Tours do not land at the bridge, but will show you a lot of Lake Powell in just 30 minutes time. You can also see about adding Horseshoe Bend to your flight route — for a few dollars more, of course 😉 Grand Staircase-Escalante and Vermilion Cliffs are both huge areas, with large chunks of it being inaccessible to vehicular traffic. It is, however, possible to see the outer edges of these National Monuments driving from Page, AZ, to Kanab, UT (Grand Staircase), or Page, AZ, to Jacob Lake, AZ, via Marble Canyon and Lees Ferry. Between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, you might take the opportunity to hike the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail . On the drive between Page, AZ, and Jacob Lake, AZ, en route to Grand Canyon North Rim, be sure to dip your feet in the Colorado River or explore around the historic Lees Ferry/Lonely Dell Ranch area. The Cliff Dweller’s Restaurant is one of the best-kept culinary secrets in Northern Arizona and is one of my personal favorite places for lunch! Is this everything there is to see and do? Not even close! But part of the fun of going someplace new is discovering the local character and hidden gems for yourself. Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year! Alley 🙂

Thank you so much! If you think of anything else that is “easy” and “kid friendly” in the area or in any of the National Parks, please let me know!! Really appreciate your help 🙂

Hi again, Lizz! Each of the National Parks has its own website that you can visit via http://www.NPS.gov . Many National Park sites have a special section dedicated to traveling with children , so you might take some time to look at those for the parks you’re visiting before you travel. The #1 kid-friendly activity available in the majority of National Parks is the Junior Ranger Program . Kids 5 and up can participate, both on-line and on-site. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Aldo, are you familiar with “secret antelope canyon” vs peek a poo canyon? I’m looking a this tour? https://horseshoebendtours.com/slot-canyon-plus-overlook

Hi Lizz! “Secret Antelope Canyon” is actually one of several drainages of the Waterholes Canyon system on the Navajo Indian Reservation. It has a few ladders to navigate, but isn’t that difficult. FYI they do have a limit on how young kids can be to tour Secret Antelope Canyon: no children younger than 6 are allowed. Peek-A-Boo is more like Upper Antelope in that it’s a fairly straightforward, flat walk. All ages are welcome in Peek-A-Boo. Bringing Kids to Antelope Canyon Should the Navajo Indian Reservation remain closed at the time of your visit, Secret Antelope Canyon will not be an option. However, the Horseshoe Bend Overlook remains open to tourists and can be visited anytime during normal operating hours (sunrise to sunset) at your leisure. Be sure to monitor the official website of the Navajo Parks & Recreation Department for current status of the Antelope Canyons, Monument Valley, Four Corners, and more. Take care, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley- Couple more questions! How far apart are the white pockets from peek a boo slot canyon? We really want to go to white pockets I know it’s difficult to get to. We have a F350 super duty that is 4WD. Do you think that would work? It’s not “high clearance”. If not, do you have any recommendations where we could rent a jeep to take? I’m not having any luck look for jeep rentals. Tours with guide are SO expensive. Thanks in advance!

Hi again, Lizz! White Pocket is ~85 miles from Peek-A-Boo Canyon, but you should allow ~2.5 hours to drive there accounting for reduced speeds on the House Rock Valley Road, and the access road to the viewing area. As for whether your truck would work, I can’t speculate on that. I wouldn’t recommend taking a vehicle out there that wasn’t considered “high clearance.” If you’d prefer to rent a jeep, you can do so through the Kanab Tour Company. According to their website, their custom Jeep Wranglers are “equipped with Fox air shocks, 36″ knobby tires and powerful carbon braided winches, these jeeps will get you from A to Z on the toughest and deepest sand scoured roads that the region has to offer.” Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Hello, What great information! I am planning a trip to Page in a couple weeks. We are driving from Phoenix on the evening of 1/14 then plan to spend 2 full days there. In addition to Glen Canyon, Antelope Canyon (if it’s open by then) and Horseshoe Bend, I was wanting to see Rainbow Bridge, Rim View Trail, Grand Staircase, and Vermillion Cliffs. I’m trying to figure out where everything is and if it’s walkable, if we have to pay, if a tour is necessary and if we will be able to see all of it in 2 days. I may have to replace some of these with the areas you mentioned. Any information you have would be greatly appreciated!

Hi Gina and thank you for your nice compliments! I apologize for taking so long to respond to your inquiry, especially since I have a bit of bad news for you: you’re not going to be able to accomplish everything on your “wish list,” namely, Antelope Canyon. The Navajo Indian Tribal Council has “unofficially” implied that the slot canyons will be closed for part of the 2021 travel season, which is most likely to mean that spring is the earliest they might open, should COVID-19 infection numbers significantly decline on the reservation. If seeing a slot canyon remains high on your priority list (and we wouldn’t blame you a bit if it does!), there might still be a way for you to do so. More on that in a minute… Horseshoe Bend is one of a few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed during COVID-19, so that one’s no problem. The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, and a one-time $10 parking fee is required. Ditto for the Page Rim View Trail, you can simply go there whenever you wish. The newly opened Grandview Overlook Park is also accessible via the Rim View Trail. Next item that may have to be negotiable: Rainbow Bridge. Since there is no road access to Rainbow Bridge, the next best way to see it is by boat tour. Unfortunately, these are on seasonal hiatus, but may operate if weather conditions are favorable and a minimum of 15 passengers are booked. To see if these requirements might be met during your visit, you must call Lake Powell Resort & Marina, the exclusive operator of Rainbow Bridge Boat Tours , directly at 928-645-1111. If a boat tour is a no-go, the only other alternative for seeing Rainbow Bridge would be to fly over it . Fixed-wing airplanes depart from Page Municipal Airport, contingent on favorable weather and at least 2 passengers booked. Flight tours last approximately 30 minutes, and although you won’t land at the bridge, an aerial tour makes for an efficient and exciting way to get a sense of how huge Lake Powell and Glen Canyon are! For Vermillion Cliffs and Grand Staircase, these tend to be most viewable as a “drive-by” between locations in and around Page, AZ. They are both huge areas, much of which is inaccessible to vehicular traffic, but you can see a good chunk of Grand Staircase driving from Page, AZ, to Kanab, UT. Scenic views of the Vermillion Cliffs are accessible around Lees Ferry, Marble Canyon, and Cliff Dwellers, about 1 hour from Page, AZ. Getting back to the subject of slot canyons, with the closure of the Antelope Canyons still in effect, we recommend that visitors go to either Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch near Paria, UT, or Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT. Of the two slot canyons, Peek-A-Boo Canyon is the most family-friendly. Located between Kanab and Mt. Carmel Junction, Utah, approximately 90 minutes from Page, AZ, this short but memorable walk featuring twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons offers classic slot canyon scenery, as well as some unique geological features. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you take one. While the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get definitely is. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, and even then, people get stuck out there on a daily basis. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. Tour companies that go to Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT, are: – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net Hope that helps. Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year! Alley 🙂

I am staying in Page/Kanab in Dec for an overnight and then the same thing in January on my return back to SLC.

Can someone help me with creating a feasible schedule to see and do as much as I can on these two separate days?

Please email me! I feel so daunted and overwhelmed by all the info for itineraries. I would be so appreciative!

Hey Jyn, Check your inbox 🙂 Alley

Will be in Page are first week of December was wondering if you had any recommendations as far as must see hikes, views or anything of the sort.

Hi Jay, Well, I’ll get the bad news out of the way first: the Antelope Canyons, a popular Page, AZ, attraction, are closed at least through the end of the year, so those won’t be an option. More on that in a minute… Fortunately, there’s no shortage of other hikes, views, etc. to be enjoyed despite the Antelope Canyons being taken off the table. Horseshoe Bend, for example, is one of a few attractions in the area that never closed during the COVID-19 pandemic. The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, and you pay a one-time $10 parking fee to visit. As you might imagine, Horseshoe Bend is very popular for sunset viewing, but I personally think that sunrise is the best time to be there because crowds are usually smaller. Other places you might go include, but are not limited to: – The Page Rim View Trail – Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook – Grand View Overlook Park – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock – Wahweap and/or Lone Rock Beaches (these are located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time) – Big Water, UT, Visitors Center and Dinosaur Museum If seeing a slot canyon remained high on your wish list, which we wouldn’t blame you for in the least, a good alternative is Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. Reputable tour companies who can help you get to Peek-A-Boo Canyon are: – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays! Alley 🙂

Can someone please contact me directly for plans in Jan. via email?

Hi Tracy, Check your in-box 🙂 Alley

My girlfriend and I are planning a trip to Phoenix in December. We have never been to Arizona or the Grand Canyon. I found that Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon are very popular. Are there any hotels/cabins/camp sites to stay at for a few nights? How far of a drive is it too the Gran Canyon Skywalk? Are there additional activities we can or can not do?

Hi Devin, Sorry to be the bearer of bad news here, but the Antelope Canyons are closed through the end of 2020 🙁 This is due to COVID-19 (surprise, surprise), which has impacted the Navajo Indian Reservation in disproportionately large numbers. If seeing a slot canyon was on your “must-do” list, there are alternatives not subject to the closure of reservation lands. More on that in a minute. I’m getting the distinct impression that you may not be aware of how far things are from one another in this part of the U.S. If you’re flying into Phoenix, for example, Grand Canyon South Rim is going to be the closest area of the park you can get to. It’s ~5 hours, one way, from Phoenix to there. From Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ (where Horseshoe Bend is located), the drive is normally ~3 hours. However, due to the closure of many Navajo Reservation lands (there’s that pesky thing again…), a critical component of the normal drive is off-limits, making a detour through Flagstaff, AZ, necessary to get from the South Rim to Horseshoe Bend. This has turned a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. Due to the driving distances involved, and the fact that days in December are very short and you should avoid driving at night, instead of staying in one place the entire time, you should move from one place to another for overnight accommodations. At the South Rim, there are 6 hotels inside the park, and 6 more just outside the park in Tusayan, AZ. If at all possible, you should stay in the immediate vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park . The same rule applies to Page, AZ, there are a couple dozen hotels in that town in a variety of amenity classes and price points. Getting back to the slot canyon quandary, there are a couple of beautiful ones located in or near the next town “up the road,” Kanab, Utah. Kanab, UT, is ~a 70-minute drive from Page, AZ. The slot canyon most walkable for virtually everyone is Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon. If you’re looking for something more rugged, Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch may be a better option for you. In either case, going with a guided tour is not required, but strongly recommended due to the access roads being unpaved. For more information, read this article on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ : “Help! My Tour Got Cancelled” Regarding the Grand Canyon Skywalk , that is more easily accessible from Las Vegas than Phoenix. It would make for a rather long swing out of your way, but if you were able to modify your plans so you can fly out of Las Vegas, that would make things easier on you. Whatever you decide, be sure to book all hotels and guided tours ASAP. Now would not be too soon to start making reservations! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thank you for providing us with all this useful information. My family and I are taking a week road trip next week to Oklahoma from San Diego but we don’t know where we should go and stop/stay. We wanted to stay in Arizona and/or Utah for 3-4 days but I’m having trouble figuring out what are the best things to do and when to do it.

Some things we wanted to do: – Peek-a-boo Canyon – Horseshoe Bend – Lake Powell – Grand Canyon (which part would work best?)

after Arizona, we plan to drive straight to Oklahoma. (Taking turns driving of course)

I really appreciate your time, thank you. I look forward to hearing back from you.

Hi Arleen! Assuming that your visit is taking place after October 15th, that narrows which areas of the Grand Canyon you can visit down to either the West Rim (or Grand Canyon West as it’s formally known) or the South Rim. The South Rim is the National Park, where the most picturesque views of the canyon can be seen from. Grand Canyon West is where the Grand Canyon Skywalk is located. For first-time visitors, we recommend the South Rim since it has the most numerous visitor services (hotels, restaurants, etc.) Taking into account your timeframe, wish list, etc., here’s what I’d suggest: Day 1 – Drive from San Diego, CA, to Kanab, UT, overnight in Kanab, UT . Doing it in one go, this is ~9 hour drive; if you wanted to break it up, Las Vegas, NV, would be a good place to do so. Day 2 – First thing in the AM, tour Peek-A-Boo Canyon (~4 hours), then drive to Page, AZ (~90 minutes). A little sightseeing at Lake Powell, overnight in Page, AZ . **Note that Lake Powell is located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires an entrance fee of $30/vehicle to visit. However, there are areas where you can get a good view of the lake without paying the fee, such as the Wahweap Overlook, Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge, the Chains/Hanging Gardens area, and the Grandview Overlook Park.** Day 3 – Visit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise, then drive to Grand Canyon South Rim, overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim . ***Normally, this is ~a 3 hour drive, but due to the closure of AZ64 between Cameron, AZ, and Desert View Point by the Navajo Indian Tribe, a detour through Flagstaff, AZ, is now required. This has turned the drive into more along the lines of 5-6 hours. Sorry 🙁 *** Day 4 – A little sightseeing at Grand Canyon South Rim, then begin the drive to Oklahoma by heading down to Williams, AZ, hopping on I-40, then following it East. If you wish, you might stop at a few Route 66 sites since you’ll be passing that way anyway! Map of the trip Hope that helps. Feel free to write in again if we can be of further guidance. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Hello Alley your page its amazing, I hope you can help me out since you now a lot about this areas.

Im planning a trip to Antilope Canyon, and Horseshoe Bend (because that’s the only places i know to be honest) but my flight will arrive to vegas in October 30, mid-day and i need to flight back on November 2 also mid-day so i need to be back in vegas sunday night. My principal questions are, is it open to visit this places because I saw that al the Navajo National Parks are closed, and i don’t wanna make a long drive in this days to arrive and have bad news. And if it is open, what would you recommend us to do since we only have those days.

Looking forward hearing from you Kind regards

Hi Mauricio, So sorry to be the bearer of bad news, especially since your trip is just around the corner, but the Antelope Canyons are closed to all tourism until the end of 2020 (at the soonest). Does that mean you should cancel your trip? Absolutely not! But, you’ll need to rearrange some things. The drive from Las Vegas, NV to Page, AZ (Horseshoe Bend), will take you about 5 hours. In Northern Arizona and Southern Utah, any and all driving must be done during daylight hours due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possibility that deer, elk, and other animals might be moving about. Sunset in Las Vegas on October 30th occurs at 5:45 PM. So if by “mid-day,” you mean that your flight will arrive in Las Vegas around noon, you could theoretically make the drive to Page, AZ, that day. If your flight arrives much after that, I’d recommend staying the night in Las Vegas, then making the drive to Page, AZ, the following day (October 31st). On October 31st, visit Horseshoe Bend and other local sights such as the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge, the “New” Wave, the John Wesley Powell/Glen Canyon Conservancy Museum, and Grandview Overlook Park, just to name a few. The following day (November 1st), get up early and drive to Kanab, UT (~70 minutes from Page, AZ) to take a tour of Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon. This short but memorable walk features scenery on par with the Antelope Canyons (which are closed), and a few that are unique to it. Although the slot canyon portion isn’t that difficult, the drive to get there is, which is why we recommend again taking a guided tour to this area. Tour companies that can get you to Peek-A-Boo in safety and comfort are: – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net Tours of Peek-A-Boo Canyon take approximately 4 hours, you then have ~a 4-hour drive back to Las Vegas. Because the change from Daylight Savings Time to Standard Time will occur on October 31st, sunset in Las Vegas will occur at about 4:45 PM on November 1st. In this case, it’s OK to do the latter part of the drive after dusk because between St. George, UT, Mesquite, NV, and Las Vegas, NV, you have a sizeable urban light dome and a relatively low risk of encountering any wildlife. Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thanks so much for this useful information. It’s a bit stressful planning this trip and noticing all the closures so I’m curious whether you have any thoughts or advice for a trip my partner and I are about to make. We are planning to fly into Las Vegas Oct 23 and rent a car to get to Zion. From Oct 23 -25 we are planning to stay in Springdale/St. George and then start making our way to Page, AZ from Oct 25-27. It looks like various of the activities we wanted to do there are closed but doing the Peek-a-boo canyon on our way to Page seems like a good alternative to Antelope Canyon. Anything else you’d recommend up to this point? October 27 we plan to make our way to Sedona for a handful of days and then will drive back to Vegas. Any ideas or suggestions would be so appreciated!

Hi Andrea, Your itinerary looks pretty fun, and very well paced! Late October is also a wonderful time to visit. I would definitely plan on touring Peek-A-Boo between Zion and Page, AZ. The tour of Peek-A-Boo will take ~ 4 hours, so refrain from scheduling anything time sensitive for that afternoon, but time permitting, you might stop at the Big Water Visitors Center in Big Water, UT, (great dinosaur displays!) and/or walk across the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge . The main priority is making sure that you’re not doing any of the drive at night. Roads in this part of the U.S. are very dimly lit, and the stretch of US89 between Kanab, UT, and Page, AZ, is a migratory route for deer and elk. You don’t want to risk a collision with a large animal such as those, or a free range cow, or wild horse, in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, possibly cold (nighttime temps are dipping down pretty low in late October), where cell service may be spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Sunset in Page, AZ, occurs at around 5:30 PM, that’s ARIZONA Time; Utah will still be one hour ahead of Arizona. Plan on hitting Horseshoe Bend on your way South when you leave town, but be aware that there’s a construction project going on in that area that could tack a few minutes onto your travel time. They’re building a long-overdue and much-needed dedicated turn lane into the Horseshoe Bend parking lot on the Northbound side of the highway. The only thing that’s jumping out at me is that the Grand Canyon is conspicuously absent from your itinerary. If you’ve never been there, you should definitely plan to go, but, the only drawback to that right now (due to COVID-19, surprise surprise) is that an integral component of the most logical travel route between Page, AZ, and Grand Canyon South Rim — AZ64 from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View — is closed. That means that, upon leaving Page, AZ, you’ll have to drive all the way back to Flagstaff before heading North on US180 to AZ64 to Grand Canyon South Rim. This very long detour has basically turned the ~3 hour drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim into a 4.5-5 hour drive. For this and other reasons, if you do decide to go th Grand Canyon South Rim, plan on staying at least one night there. Grand Canyon hotels The drive to Sedona, AZ, would then take ~2.5 hours. If you decide to skip the Grand Canyon this time around, and go straight from Page, AZ, to Sedona, that drive will take ~3 hours. Hope that helps. Feel free to write in again if you need to bounce more ideas off us. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thanks so much Alley! We have a hotel in Sedona starting Oct 27 so it looks like maybe we have to shift things around. If it’s between Grand Canyon and Page/lake Powell what do you think is most worth it? We can plan to do peek a boo on our way into page oct 25 and then maybe some hiking/kayaking and horseshoe bend on Oct 26 before heading out oct 27 or maybe skip this all together and do the Grand Canyon south rim? Any good recommendations for this leg including kayaking and hiking options?

Hi Andrea, Normally, I’d say that the Grand Canyon should be prioritized over Page, AZ, but since you’re coming down from Zion, you’re going to have to pass through that way anyway. Should you want to try and skip Page, AZ, and just go direct from Zion to Gand Canyon South Rim, with the section of AZ64 from Cameron to Desert View being closed, that’s going to turn what’s normally a long drive in the first place (5 hours) into a 7-8 hour drive . Even if you don’t have a problem spending that much time behind the wheel, skipping Page, AZ, will take any kayaking on the Colorado River out of the equation. There are no places at Grand Canyon South Rim where you can do that kind of activity on a one-day basis, although hiking opportunities are plentiful. You might be able to find some kayaking tours on the Verde River in Sedona, AZ . I have no first-hand experience with those, so if you take one, let us know how you liked it! Long story short, I’d recommend keeping the stop in Page, AZ, in light of the current situation with road closures, etc. Take care and Happy Halloween! Alley 🙂

Thanks so much, Alley. Truly truly so helpful. Appreciate your time and advice! Page, AZ it is and Grand Canyon next time.

Hey Andrea, I think that’s a good call in light of your existing travel plans. One thing I’m not sure if I mentioned is that if you want to at least say you saw the Grand Canyon without setting foot within the park boundaries, it is possible to fly over it out of Page, AZ, in a fixed wing airplane. If this piques your curiosity, visit http://www.WestwindAirService.com : Page, AZ, air tours Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thanks for the airplane suggestion! That could be really cool. One more question after continuing to do some research. What do you think of buckskin gulch as a day hike from wire pass trailhead instead of the peekaboo slot canyon. This seems like it would be more adventurous and more of a hike than the tour I looked into for peekaboo. Any advice or red flags welcome! I know it says not to do this if there is any sign of rain.

Hi again, Andrea! If you’re up for something more rugged than Peek-A-Boo, Wire Pass Canyon and Buckskin Gulch would definitely fit the bill. Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which is typically filled with deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! As you’ve apparently discovered, access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road, which is unpaved. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road under any circumstances since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get you to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Reputable companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include: – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com Have a great trip! Alley 🙂

Hi Alley, My wife and I are planning a trip from San Diego CA to Page AZ, Grand Cyn South Rim & Prescott AZ leaving on Saturday 9/19/20. We have reservations for rooms booked in all 3 locations. I’m looking for some advice on whether we should modify our plans for the Page visit. We originally planned to spend Saturday driving from San Diego to Page. About 9 hours, yikes! Sunday we were planning on Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Cyn. Monday we were going to Four Corners. So much for those plans. Tuesday 9/22 we drive to GC South Rim staying 2 nights @ Bright Angel Lodge. No availability @ that location other than what we have booked. Thursday 9/24 we’re off to Prescott with 2 nights booked @ Hassayampa Inn. Drive home to SD on Saturday 9/26. I’m not concerned about the GC & Prescott portion of the trip. I am considering shortening our stay in Page by cancelling Saturday and travelling Sunday, given that 2 of our planned activities are not possible. We can do other stuff around the Page area Glen Cyn, Lake Powell etc but maybe don’t need as much time as we had planned. Is one full day in Page enough or should we stay with the original plan and improvise activities? What’s your opinion on this and what is the status of the closure of AZ64 from Cameron to Desert View?

Hi Richard, So sorry that COVID-19 has thrown a wrench into your travel plans 🙁 However, I would not necessarily shorten your stay in Page, AZ. I would just recommend making a few modifications. With the closure of the Navajo Nation being extended through at least 09/30, Four Corners will have to come off the table. Since the Antelope Canyons are closed , and are likely to remain so at the time of your visit, I’d recommend using one of your days in Page, AZ, to make the short trip to Kanab, UT, and tour Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we recommend that you take one anyway. While the hike through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. Even then, people still get stuck. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. To explore Peek-A-Boo in safety and comfort, contact any one of these reputable tour companies to choose from in Kanab, UT: – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net While in Kanab, be sure to enjoy a meal at the Rocking V Cafe , or, if you opt for an early tour, maybe breakfast at Kanab Creek Bakery 🙂 On your second day in Page, AZ, hit Horseshoe Bend right at sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Then you could head over to the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge, park your vehicle near its Eastern flank, and venture down to The Chains , a popular local swimming area. It is a bit of a hike to get down to the water (and back up), but if you’re in reasonably good health, you should be able to manage it. You could also piggy-back that with a hike to the Hanging Gardens area nearby. The springs are probably dry, but it’s a neat little hike, to an unexpected sight here in the desert! If you prefer a flatter walk to the lake, the Wahweap Swim Beach , inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (meaning an entrance fee required), would be a nice way to spend the afternoon as well. For sunset, you might try the brand new Grandview Overlook Park near Lakeview Elementary School in Page, AZ. Only recently opened to the public, it has a paved trail, benches and shade awnings. Long story short, even with the Antelope Canyons being closed, you’ll find plenty to do in Page. Indeed, a Chamber of Commerce employee I’m acquainted with tells me that folks come to town thinking that “everything is closed,” but invariably discover that “we need another day here!” As for the rest of your trip, it sounds really fun! Good job scoring a reservation at Bright Angel Lodge and Hassayampa Inn. Unfortunately, AZ64 from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View Point on the South Rim remains closed. As to when/if it will open is anybody’s guess. Which means you’ll have to make that round-a-bout schlep from Page, AZ, to the South Rim via Flagstaff, extending a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour trip. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news on that front. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley!!! We will be in Page, AZ tonight and we have narrowed our destinations to the following: 1 . Horseshoe Bend Kayak Friday- tomorrow morning. It should take about 3-4 hours, do you think we can still have “time” to take the hike to Horseshoe Bend Overlook? ***spend the night @ Page,AZ*** 2. Head out early to see the Red Canyon/ Peek-a-boo Canyon. Which tour do you recommend: A)https://kanabtourcompany.com/tour/atv-tour-peek-a-boo-slot-canyon/ B) https://www.dreamlandtours.net/day-tours/kanab/peekaboo-slot-canyon/

Thank you so much for your guidance.

Hey again Jenn, This sounds like a really fun weekend! You should have time to do all the things you wish to do in the order you’ve outlined them. As for which Red Canyon/Peek-A-Boo Canyon tour I’d recommend, they’re both fun and both companies have excellent reputations for safety and service. The main prioirity should be to get some reservations made. Since the closure of the Antelope Canyons, Peek-A-Boo Canyon is having a serious moment! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi, I plan to visit north rim Grand Canyon from Orange County tomorrow morning. Any suggestions for my itinerary? Should I drive straight to nearby hotel- motels to see horseshoe bend antelope canyon early Friday or stay in Vegas for the night? Please help? We need to get back by Sunday night

Hi Jenn, I sure hate to possibly spoil your plans, but they’re in need of a reality check. First off, the Antelope Canyons are closed due to COVID-19, so that’s off the table. More on that in a minute… Help! My Antelope Canyon Tour Got Cancelled Secondly, if you don’t have any accommodations booked at Grand Canyon North Rim, you’re going to be in for a rude awakening there, too. Hotels at Grand Canyon North Rim are few and far between, and as such tend to get booked up months, sometimes years in advance. It’s even worse this year because many hotels have reduced staffing levels and room inventory due to COVID-19. Trust me, after an 8.5-hour drive (that’s how long it takes to get to the North Rim), you don’t want to waste a second of sightseeing time searching in vain for a motel room! If I were you, I’d start looking for accommodations in St. George, Utah (~3 hours from the North Rim), or Kanab, Utah (~90 minutes from the North Rim) for tomorrow night (Friday). Drive straight there, then on Saturday, make a day trip to the North Rim. Spend Saturday night in Kanab, UT, then on Sunday morning, take an early morning tour of Red Canyon/Peek-A-Boo Canyon, drive to Page, AZ, to visit Horseshoe Bend, then had back to LA. You could also do it the “opposite” (kind of) way by driving directly from Orange County to Page, AZ (~8 hour drive) tomorrow, spend the night in Page, AZ , visit Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning (~2 hours), drive on to Kanab, UT, to tour Red Canyon/Peek-A-Boo (3-4 hours), pop into the North Rim, then come back to Kanab, UT or St. George, UT for the night. The next day drive home to LA. Map In all honesty, though, this plan is less than ideal. You need at least an extra day to comfortably hit all these attractions without it being a race against time to get to your next destination every day. If you do try to pull this off, one important consideration is daylength, or, lack thereof: any and all driving should be done during daylight hours in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possibility of deer, elk, and other large wildlife congregating on the shoulder. You don’t want to risk a collision with a free range cow in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold (North Rim temps are dipping down into the 30’s and 40’s already), where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive! Sunrise in Kanab, UT, occurs just after 7:00 AM, sunset takes place around 7:45 PM. Note that Arizona is on Mountain STANDARD Time, so their clocks will be one hour “behind” Kanab, UT. If two days is truly all you have, you’ll need to narrow your wish list down to two attractions, or — make the most of your limited time by flying over Horseshoe Bend and the Grand Canyon! Fixed wing airplanes can be chartered out of Kanab, UT , Hurricane, UT, and Page, AZ . Pricey? Most definitely, but an unforgettable experience well worth the price of admission! Good luck and safe travels. If you get a minute after you get home, let us know how things went! Take care, Alley 🙂

Hello, I am planning on traveling by car with my boyfriend from Moab (2 nights there) to Zion (another 2 nights) and then planned to spend 2 nights in Page, and see the Grand Canyon on our way to Vegas. Do you think we should adjust our itinerary at all and spend less time or more time in one or any of these locations? I’m just not sure how long we need in Page to see/do the sites and activities you spoke about in your post and then also be able to enjoy the Grand Canyon while making our way to Vegas. We were planning to leave Page AZ on the 27th in the early AM to make it to Grand Canyon and then make it to Vegas by night, do think this is unrealistic? Any advice, tips, anything would be so greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance 🙂

Hi Michelle! Going off the assumption that you are traveling on the 27th of September, 1. that’s a really nice time to visit Grand Canyon’s North Rim to see the fall foliage and 2. yes, it is unrealistic to go there are as a “pop-by” on your way from Page, AZ, to Las Vegas, NV. It takes approximately 2.5-3 hours to drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon North Rim. Along the way, you really should take the opportunity to visit the Lees Ferry/Marble Canyon area, maybe have lunch at Cliff Dweller’s Restaurant . Then stop at the Jacob Lake Inn , ~60 miles North of the Canyon rim, to pick up some of their famously scrumptious home-made cookies. After sightseeing at the North Rim, you’d then have to face another 5 hours behind the wheel to get back to Las Vegas. For safety, comfort, and to maximize your enjoyment of your Grand Canyon visit, it would be better to spend the night in the immediate area, or somewhere relatively close by. Lodging at the park itself and within a 60 mile radius is scant, and tends to be booked up months, sometimes a year or more in advance. Your best bet at this point would probably be to look for lodging in the area of Kanab, Utah, about 90 minutes from the North Rim, or St. George, Utah, whic is ~3 hours from the North Rim. If you opt to stay in St. George, that would put you just 2.5 hours from Las Vegas the following morning. Kanab would put you a bit further away, ~3.5 hours. Map Grand Canyon North Rim lodging The easiest way to accommodate this would be to drop a night in Page, AZ. Since the Antelope Canyons are closed at the moment, you wouldn’t be sacrificing much. If touring a slot canyon is still on your “must-do” list, you could hit Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT, on your way from Zion to Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we recommend that you take one anyway. While the hike through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. Even then, people still get stuck. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. To explore Peek-A-Boo in safety and comfort, contact any one of these reputable tour companies to choose from in Kanab, UT: – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net One thing that does kind of jump out at me is that Bryce Canyon is apparently missing from your itinerary. If your trip is already planned, meaning lodging booked, etc., you’d probably have a hard time changing things around to accommodate it. You could either sacrifice Moab and save it for antoher trip, or, while not ideal, hit Bryce as a “drive-by” between Moab and Zion. The drive from Moab to Zion, via the shortest route, takes ~6 hours. Detouring through Bryce would add another 90 minutes onto the trip. Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

I am planning a trip from October 21-October 25. Was wondering if it is worth driving for 8 hours (Los Angeles-CA)? Wanted to do a lot of sigh-seeing and noticed a lot of the places are currently closed. Wondering if they will re-open in October?

My plan was to visit the Antelope Canyon, Horseshoe bend, Vermilion Cliff National Monument, Monument Valley, Sedona.

The hotel i was looking at is 5 minutes from Horseshoe bend. I was looking through viator.com and they offer tours but i am a bit confused as to how since the locations are closed (at least from what i researched). Any advise would help so i don’t waste money purchasing stuff because i’m afraid if i get there and they won’t let us un due to limitations from COVID.

Dear Tina, First off, it’s too soon to call whether some attractions in the area will still be closed as a result of COVID-19 at the time of your visit. At the moment, Horseshoe Bend is open, as is Vermillion Cliffs, and Sedona. The Antelope Canyons are expected to remain closed through August 31st. Whether that will be extended remains to be seen. Ditto with Monument Valley, with the notable exception of Goulding’s Lodge , albeit with some limitations/modifications. Regarding Viator.com, although they are a reputable company, the fact remains that they are a third party booking agency. Your best bet for getting the facts about the status of various attractions is to go directly to the source. For Horseshoe Bend, since it is technically a part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, the Glen Canyon National Park Service website would be the site to monitor. For the status of the Antelope Canyons and Monument Valley, since they are on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands, the Navajo Nation Parks & Recreation website will give current updates. Since Sedona, AZ, is not on reservation lands, but straddles two counties in Arizona, closures of some facilities may factor into your travel plans, but then again, by the time you visit, they may not. There is presently a mask mandate in Arizona, which has seen mixed compliance, but most bars, restaurants, hotels, and tour operators are open, just operating at limited capacity. For more information, visit the “What’s Open?” section of the Sedona Convention & Visitors’ Bureau website . To visit Antelope Canyon, you must have advance reservations for a guided tour. To be notified of when/if the Antelope Canyons reopen, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ and ask to be placed on our priority e-mail list . Horseshoe Bend may be visited at your convenience, between the hours of sunrise and sunset. I hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thanks so much this was amazing information. Would you please list some places that you would recommend that i should visit during this pandamic for a first time visitor? I would like to get as much out of my visit as possible with sightseeing activities. As mentioned in my initial email the hotel that i booked is 5 minutes from the Hourseshoe bend but i am willing to drive an hour or two here and there for a chance to see beautiful places. Also if there is a central location that you think is better than the hotel that I booked i would take into considerations in looking into.

My main thing i want to get out of this trip since i am driving 8-9 hours is i want to see a lot of places and not just stay in the hotel i love exploring. Anything would help again thanks so much.

Hello again, Tina! In light of the fact that your visit is taking place in late October, I would not recommend using Page, AZ, as a “base camp” and making day trips to the various sites you might want to visit. There are several reasons for this, mainly that many of the most scenic locations in the area are 2-2.5 hours drive one way from Page, AZ, and also, your days are getting short. You want to avoid driving at night at pretty much all costs due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possibility you might have a collision with a large animal, such as a deer, elk, free range cow, or even a wild horse. Trust me, that’s not something you want to deal with in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell phone service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive! If you want to visit more than one park on this trip, your safest bet will be to move each day to the various locations so you can be there (or nearby) at sunset. Another consideration, if your trip is indeed going to be only 3-4 days in length is to take Sedona, AZ, off the table. Not that it isn’t a beautiful area; it definitely is! But you need at least 3-4 days — essentially your entire trip duration — to ‘scratch the surface’ of all there is to see and do there! With that in mind, I’d recommend doing something like this: October 21st: Drive to Zion National Park, overnight in Springdale, UT October 22nd: 2nd day/night in Zion, take Zion Canyon Scenic Drive Shuttle to explore the park (advance reservations strongly recommended for shuttle) October 23rd: Drive to Kanab, UT (~1 hour drive from Springdale, UT), tour Peek-A-Boo Slot Canyon, drive remainder of the way to Page, AZ (~1.25 hour drive), stop at Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge, overnight in Page October 24th: Visit Horseshoe Bend, drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~3 hour drive if Navajo Tribe lifts closure of AZ64 from Cameron to Desert View, ~4.5-5 hour drive if they don’t), overnight at Grand Canyon October 25th: drive home If you would prefer to keep your reservations in place in Page, AZ, for convenience, then you should limit your drive times to less than 1-1.5 hours each way for safety. In this case, you could make a day trip to Kanab, UT, to tour Peek-A-Boo Slot Canyon (if the Antelope Canyons remain closed), then another to Zion, another to the Lees Ferry/Marble Canyon area. Should the Navajo Tribe keep the Eastern portion of AZ64 to Grand Canyon South Rim closed at the time of your visit, I wouldn’t recommend going there as a day trip. That will mean 8-10 hours behind the wheel, which doesn’t sound like a fun thing to do on vacation. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi, me again, thanks for all the info. Would you list some touristy things to do in Sedona in case we decide to just visit there? Thanks again for all the info really helpful.

So much great info here!

We are spending a few days at the Grand Canyon, and then had planned a stop in Page for a night. The plan was to do an Antelope Canyon Tour and a Horseshoe Bend raft trip before heading on to Bryce Canyon but now both of those are cancelled.

I’m trying to decide if we should keep our night in Page, just go straight to the Bryce Canyon Lodge, or do a night somewhere else on the way. And wondering what’s best to do and see along the way.

Thanks for any tips!

Hi Erin, and thank you for your compliments! So sorry that COVID-19 has thrown such a wrench into peoples’ travel plans this summer 🙁 Assuming that you are staying at Grand Canyon South Rim, you certainly could opt to drive on by Page, AZ, to Bryce Canyon, but that’s already a long drive, and having to go all the way back to Flagstaff, AZ, then North on US89 will turn it into a 7-hour drive at the very least. Not my idea of a vacation, but that’s just me. Here’s what I’d recommend instead to salvage your vacation: Drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Lees Ferry. You’ll still have to go back down to Flagstaff, AZ, due to the closure of AZ64 between Desert View and Cameron, unfortunately, but what you can do at Lees Ferry is rent a kayak, take a backhaul boat to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then leisurely paddle the 15 miles back to Lees Ferry through Horseshoe Bend. That’s the best alternative going to the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip at this time. For more information on that trip, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com Plan on grabbing lunch or dinner at Cliff Dweller’s Restaurant . This place is one of the best-kept culinary secrets in Northern Arizona; the view is great, the food is amazing! As for where you might stay, lodging in the immediate area is scant, but Page, AZ, is only about an hour away. The following morning, get an early start on the day, hit Horseshoe Bend right at sunrise, then take a tour of Peek-A-Boo Slot Canyon in Kanab, UT . Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo is a beautiful slot canyon, which is having a serious moment this season because it’s not subject to the closure of Native American lands. The tour will last ~3-4 hours, then you can drive on to Bryce, which takes ~90 minutes from Kanab. If you don’t fancy taking the time and/or spending the money on a tour, another cool activity you might partake of on the drive from Page, AZ, to Bryce Canyon, UT, is the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail . The trailhead is very easy to find, at Mile Marker 19 on US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, near the Paria River. Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thanks so much for this! I’ll let you know how we do.

Hi, Alley! We are planning a trip from San Antonio to Arizona. (First stop Scottsdale.) What would you recommend we can see in about 7 day trip !?

Hi Adela! I have family in Austin, TX, so I’ve made the drive from Northern AZ to Texas myself several times. In each case, I broke the drive up into two days, in different locations depending on the weather. Since you indicate that Scottsdale, AZ, will be your first stop, I assume that that will be “Day 1” of your vacation. I’ll also assume that the 7 days will not include the return drive to San Antonio. Here’s what I’d suggest: Day 1 – Drive to Scottsdale, overnight in Scottsdale Day 2 – Drive to Page, AZ, tour Antelope Canyon (if it’s open, if not, there are alternatives… more on that in a minute), overnight in Page, AZ Day 3 – Visit Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning, drive to Bryce Canyon, UT (~3 hours), overnight in Bryce Canyon area Day 4 – Drive to Zion National Park (~2 hours); if Antelope Canyon is closed at the time of your visit, swing down to Kanab, UT, and tour Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Slot Canyon , overnight in Kanab Day 5 – 2nd day/night in Kanab, further exploration of Zion National Park (it’s a big park, you’ll be glad you had the time!) Day 6 – Drive from Kanab, UT, to Grand Canyon South Rim ***depending on the status of COVID-19 on the Navajo Indian Reservation, specifically whether AZ64 is open from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View Point, this could be anywhere from a 4 hour drive to a 6 hour drive!*** overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim Day 7 – start drive back to TX If the prospect of driving into Utah doesn’t appeal, you could go straight to Page, AZ, and GC South Rim, then spend the rest of your time in Sedona, AZ. If your trip is scheduled for the late fall/winter months, you might want to skip the Utah parks if you’re not used to colder weather and/or driving in the snow. Hope that helps. Feel free to write in again if you need further guidance! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hey!! We are honeymooning in Arizona since the international borders are still closed. 🙁 We are so excited and will be flying in and staying in Scottsdale. Any suggestions on how to plan out scottsdale but also get to drive to see antelope canyons, horseshoe bend, and a few other scenic places. Also, any really romantic places we should take time to see. We will have about 7-9 days there.

Hey Diane, If it’s romance you’re looking for, you should definitely plan a stop in beautiful Sedona, AZ ! This town, just 2 short hours from Scottsdale, AZ, is chock-a-block with beautiful scenery, lovely hotels, fun activities, and chill-time enhancers. 3-4 days is recommended to fully enjoy and explore this world-class destination. Depending on hotel availability and personal preference, you should schedule Sedona as your first or last stop on your tour of Northern Arizona. Assuming you prefer to save the longer drives for the front end of your trip, you could do something like this: Day 1 – Fly to Arizona, overnight in Scottdale Day 2 – Explore Scottsdale, AZ — popular activities include tours of Taliesin West, Old Town Scottsdale, the Desert Botanical Garden, and the Heard Museum, just to name a few! 2nd night in Scottsdale Day 3 – drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~5 hours), stop in Flagstaff, AZ, for lunch, overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim Day 4 – sightseeing in Grand Canyon South Rim area, drive to Page, AZ (**due to the closure of AZ64 from Desert View to Cameron, AZ, by the Navajo Indian Tribe, you will have to drive back to Flagstaff then North to Page, AZ via US89 — this will lengthen what is normally a 2.5-3 hour drive to 4.5-5 hours ), overnight in Page, AZ Day 5 – visit Horseshoe Bend Overlook after sunrise, tour Antelope Canyon (if open), if not, then consider Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT. Maybe take a swim at Lone Rock Beach on the way back to Page, AZ, for your 2nd night. Day 6 – Drive from Page, AZ, to Sedona, AZ (~3-3.5 hour drive), take Pink Jeep Broken Arrow Tour , overnight in Sedona Day 7 – More sightseeing in Sedona — maybe take a sunrise hot air balloon ride to start the day? Wine tasting in the afternoon, 2nd night in Sedona Day 8 – 3rd day/night in Sedona – possible activities: day trip to Jerome , Montezuma Castle /Well and/or Tuzigoot National Monuments Day 9 – Drive back to Scottsdale, AZ (~2.5 hours), fly home Hope that helps! Please feel free to write in again if you need to bounce other ideas off me. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Nicely done!

hi me and my boyfriend are trying to plan a trip to see the grand canyon, antelope canyon and horseshoe bend overlook. we are renting a car from vegas and driving down but i’m confused on which rim is closest we so can see all three in 2 days. also where would a good middle ground area be to stay??

Hi Kennedy, Under normal circumstances, I would advise you to go to Grand Canyon South Rim, then on to Page, AZ, to see Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend. As you are no doubt aware, though, circumstances right now are far from normal. For one, the Antelope Canyons are closed by executive order of the Navajo Tribe. However, there are other beautiful slot canyons in the area not covered by that order. More on that in a minute. Secondly, an integral component of the route from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, has been closed, again, by order of the Navajo Tribe. This turns what would normally be approximately a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. What’s a person to do under these circumstances? If your visit is occurring between now and October 15th, this: Day 1: Get an early start on the drive from Las Vegas, NV, to Kanab, UT (~4-4.5 hour drive); take an afternoon tour of Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Slot Canyon. This slot canyon is just as beautiful as Antelope in many ways, and while a tour is not mandatory to visit, they are strongly recommended due to the difficult terrain of the access road to the canyon’s entrance. Tour length is 3 hours, afternoon tours with Dreamland Safaris depart at 2:00 PM, 3:00 PM, and 4:00 PM . Advance reservations required. Day 2: Get an early start and do a day trip to Grand Canyon North Rim (~2 hour drive, each way). Hike the rim trail or a short distance down the North Kaibab Trail. Grand Canyon NOrth Rim hiking Since food and beverage outlets are only operating at limited capacity, best to pack a picnic lunch, or grab something to eat at the Jacob Lake Inn (their home-made cookies are the bomb!). Whatever you do, be sure to time your activities so that you’re back on the road at least 2 hours before sunset. You do not want to do any driving in this this area at night! There are lots of deer, elk, and other large wildlife such as free range cattle and wild horses that can ratchet up your risk of an accident in an area that’s pitch black, possibly very cold (the North Rim is at 8,000′ ASL), where cell phone service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Another potential complication: Arizona is on Mountain STANDARD Time, whereas Kanab, UT, is on Mountain DAYLIGHT Time, meaning Kanab, UT, is one hour “ahead” of Arizona. Be aware of when sunset occurs and what time zone you’re in on your travel day, so you can ensure that you’re “wheels up” in plenty of time to make it back to Kanab, UT, by sundown. Day 3: Get an early start on the day (see a pattern here? 😉 drive down to Page, AZ (~1.5 hour drive), to visit Horseshoe Bend. Allow about 2 hours to park, walk to the overlook, take photos, and walk back to your vehicle. The drive back to Las Vegas (~5 hour drive). I know this will be a long day already, but if you’re open to taking the drive at a more leisurely pace (and avoiding some backtracking), you might consider going down to the Marble Canyon/Lees Ferry area, dipping your feet in the river, then stopping for lunch at the Cliff Dweller’s Lodge . This is one of the best-kept culinary secrets in Northern Arizona! Not only is the view amazing, but the food is surprisingly sophisticated for a little hole in the wall out in the middle of nowhere. Map of the proposed itinerary Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Does anyone know the mile marker for Little Cut south of the turnoff for the the bend where the teepees are so great at sunrise?

Have 7-8 days to visit Arizona. Can fly in/out of LAS or PHX. Want to visit GC south, Monument Valley, maybe Page/Sedona. Open 2 other suggestions. Going middle/end April, 2020. We’re 2 older adults 70+, not very active. What would you recommend as far as itinerary, tours with easy timing. Thanks

Hi Charlee, With 7-8 days to work with, you can have a wonderful vacation in Northern Arizona and even parts of Southern Utah! As for which airport you fly in and/or out of , that depends largely on who’s offering the better airfare. Las Vegas tends to win out in that regard, but check both before you commit. Another popular option is to fly into one and out of the other, but before you commit to that, make sure your rental car drop-off fees won’t be prohibitively high. That said, here’s what I’d recommend: Day 1: Fly to Las Vegas, drive to Zion National Park (~4 hours), overnight in Springdale, Utah Day 2: Explore Zion Canyon Scenic Drive using free shuttles , a little hiking if desired , 2nd night in Springdale Day 3: Drive from Zion National Park to Page, AZ (~2.5 hour drive), optional stop at Big Water Visitors Center , Glen Canyon Dam , tour Upper Antelope Canyon in the afternoon, overnight in Page Day 4: Visit Horseshoe Bend at sunrise, drive to Monument Valley (~2 hours), take guided backcountry tour , overnight in Monument Valley **in the very likely event Monument Valley Lodging is sold out, you can visit it from Page, AZ, as a day trip; remember that MV time is one hour ahead of Page, AZ, so keep an eye on the clock and make sure you begin the drive back to Page, AZ, well before sunset. Another option: fly over it out of Page, AZ by fixed wing airplane ** Day 5: Drive from Monument Valley to Grand Canyon South Rim (~3.5-4 hour drive), stop at Cameron Trading Post for breakfast/brunch, overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim Day 6: Drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Sedona (~3 hour drive), take Pink Jeep Broken Arrow tour , overnight in Sedona Day 7: More sightseeing in Sedona , 2nd night in Sedona Day 8: Drive to Phoenix (~2 hours) or Las Vegas (~4.5 hours), fly home How you ultimately structure your itinerary will come down to 2 key factors: availability of Grand Canyon hotels and Antelope Canyon tours. If availability or lack thereof dictates, you may have to flip-flop this itinerary, which won’t detract from the quality of your trip in any way. April is just around the corner, so start booking lodging and tours ASAP! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

I’m thinking to visit Antelope canyon and Horseshoe Bend in mid of Feb next year. Wondering the road conditions if I drive from Flagstaffs to Page? Snow or icy? Thank you

Hi Lucy, Snow and ice on the roads is a very real possibility at that time of year. But then again, it could be sunny and pleasantly brisk. It’s too soon to call at this point, but I would recommend monitoring local weather and road conditions about 2-3 weeks before you get set to travel. Here are a couple of links you can use: Horseshoe Bend weather Arizona Road Conditions Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays, Alley 🙂

I am keen of doing a 2 day tour from Phoenix to the below, is there any tour operator who can help me cover that?

– Phoenix to Lower Antelope, Horse-shoe bend. Staying one night in Page (camping or lodge) – Day 2 , Page to Grand Canyon South Rim and back to Phoenix.

Is this advisable and is it a popular tour offered for tourist?

Hi Naman, There are tours from Phoenix that will take you to Antelope Canyon, Horseshoe Bend, and/or the Grand Canyon, but the majority will be one-day tours, such those offered by Detours American West . Strange as it may sound, you are more likely to find the type of tour you are looking for originating from Las Vegas, such as this 2-day Antelope Canyon/Grand Canyon package from Viator . Ultimately, the way to experience these attractions that offers the most freedom and flexibility is to self-drive. All roads from Phoenix, AZ, to Page, AZ, and Grand Canyon South Rim are fully paved and well-traveled. The drive from Phoenix to Page, AZ, takes approximately 5 hours. The trip from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim takes 3.5-4 hours (factoring in stops, it’s a very scenic drive), and the drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Phoenix takes around 5 hours. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

I am planning to visit in October 31st thru November 2nd do you think weather would good ? I am planning to do proposal during sunrise do you think weather and seen would be nice ?

Hi John, and congratulations on your hopefully impending nuptials! Page, AZ, weather at the end of October/early November is kind of like that old poem about the “little girl with the little curl, right in the middle of her forehead.” You’re probably too young to know what I’m going on about, but let’s just say essence of the punchline to that story is a lot like Page, AZ, weather at that time of year: when it’s good, it’s very, very good, but when it’s bad, it’s horrid. Best case scenario, you’ll have a day that’s sunny and brisk, probably jacket weather, so be sure to pack those. Worst case scenario: cold, wet, windy, possibly light snow and gray skies. I know, I lived in Page, AZ, for 15 years and saw all of the above, and everything in between! If you have the option of traveling at a different time, I’d advise moving your trip date up a couple of weeks. Weather in mid-October is usually picture-perfect, with pleasant temperatures, blue skies, and very little precipitation, if any. Naturally, what this year will shake out like is too soon to call, so start monitoring local weather about 2 weeks before you get set to travel. That will give you the best idea of how to pack. Sunrise tends to be the best time to visit Horseshoe Bend for taking advantage of smaller crowds. Mid-day gets very busy, and parking can be somewhat problematic . Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Thank you so much for the reply, I cant change the date no more everything set up already flights hotels and other stuff. I am going with my luck hopefully we going to have some good scenery and weather. I know this is only about the touristic places and i will be staying in Page, AZ. would you recommend to go any places for celebration after restaurants bars or something else.

Thank you so much

Hi again, John! Any number of restaurants or cocktail lounges in Page, AZ, would be a wonderful place to celebrate your engagement, but if you want to make it super-special, I’d suggest the Rainbow Room at the Lake Powell Resort . It’s situated within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so you’d have to pay the $25/vehicle entrance fee to get in, but the view of the lake is absolutely gorgeous! Ditto for the Antelope Point Marina , which the $25/vehicle entrance fee would also be required for, but again, it’s right down by the water and would make a memorable “capper” to what will hopefully be a very special day. If you’d prefer not to mess with the logistics of getting down to the lake, the State 48 Tavern and the Blue Coffee & Wine Bar are nice places right in the town of Page, AZ. Have a wonderful time! Alley 🙂

Hi Alley, Hubby and I are planning to visit the lower antelope canyon and the horse-shoe bend in August. We are looking at staying in Page, Arizona for 3 – 4 days max. I am wondering if there are tours that would include hotel pick-ups and drop-offs. Any recommendations would be highly appreciated. Thanks, Gilda

Hi Gilda, and thank you for this excellent inquiry. Unfortunately, tours that offer hotel transfers are virtually non-existent in Page, AZ, simply because it’s a very small town and Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend are relatively close to most hotels. So this leads me to the question, how are you getting to Page? If you’re driving your own vehicle, Horseshoe Bend is ~a 10 minute drive from town; Antelope Canyon is about the same. If you’re flying in, or using a service like National Park Express , it would be best to reserve a rental car for your time here. Otherwise, you might contact your chosen tour operators by phone to see if you can make special arrangements to be picked up and dropped off, which may or may not involve extra cost. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Will definitely do Alley. Keep the good work to help others to have a perfect vacation on this beautiful land. Greetings from PA, Mihaela

Hi Alley, I want to thank you so very much for your precious guidance. Based on your info posted here we had an amazing vacation seeing Sedona, South Rim GC, Page with some of the beauties (Lower and Upper Antelope, Glen Canyon, part of lake Powell, Horseshoe Bend, driving through the beautiful “Cut” and the out this world landscapes north of Flagstaff. All these in only 4 days. It was a lifetime dream come true. We’ll definitely return. Mihaela

Hi Mihaela, Thank you SO MUCH for taking the time to give us feedback on our itinerary, and guidance! I’m overjoyed to hear that you had a good trip, and even moreso to hear that you plan to return someday. When that time comes, if you need further guidance, feel free to contact us again. You may also contact me privately at [email protected] Take care and have a wonderful summer! Alley 🙂

Hi, Alley. I maybe moving to page for work within 4 months, if I accept the job offer. How is it living in page Arizona? I live in west valley currently (Arizona ). What places should I visit that’s more so a local spot? I will be traveling to page next week, to get a feel for the town ? Thank you.

Hi Ashley, Having lived in Page, AZ, myself for 15 mostly happy years, I can summarize a few pros and cons as follows: Pros: beautiful views everywhere you look, close proximity to the Grand Canyon, Bryce, Zion, Lake Powell and other National Parks, people are friendly, good weather most of the year Cons: isolation (2.5 hours drive to the nearest place that passes for a “city”), housing costs high for the area, VERY hot summers, most services geared toward tourists vs. locals As for places to visit that are more “local” spots, I would actually suggest joining the Facebook Group “Page, Arizona Community Bulletin Board” and bounce some of your questions off current and former area residents. Hope that helps. Good luck in your decision! Alley 🙂

Hi Alley, what is the best time of the year to visit upper and lower Antelope Valley/Horse Shoe Bend (weather wise). Thank you.

Hi Jean! If you are able to pick and choose what time to visit Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, I would strongly recommend October. Autumn typically offers cooler temperatures, stable weather patterns, and what with most kids being back in school, it’s mostly just us grownups out touring. It is still busy, however, so hotels, Antelope Canyon tours , and reservations at higher end restaurants should be booked in advance. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Hi, We are planning to visit Sedona, Grand Canyon North rim and Page (Horseshoe bend, Antelope Canyon). We will be reaching Phoenix late mid-night on May 17th and have a flight back on May 21 at 9:30 PM from Phoenix. We have an infant (20 months old). We could get Upper Antelope tour for May 19th evening 4:30 PM. Can you please help us plan an itinerary that will wok best for us. This is what we are thinking as of now. May 17th – Stay in Phoenix for the night May 18th (Day 1) – Start a trip to Page, planning to see Sunset and stay overnight there. May 19th (Day 2) – Glen Canyon Dam, Lake Powell, and Antelope Canyon Tour in evening May 20th (Day 3) – Start to Grand Canyon in morning, cover scenic drive, stay overnight May 21 (Day 4) – Start back to Phoenix. On the way visit 1-2 places in Sedona.

Hi Sunibha! The itinerary you have is fine, except for that last day, when you propose to “visit 1-2 places in Sedona” on the way from Grand Canyon North Rim to Phoenix. It’s about a 6-hour drive from the North Rim to Phoenix, and while it is feasible to make a detour through Sedona (it will add at least an hour to your drive), you don’t have time to do any sightseeing. Besides, you won’t find a “drive-by” viewing to be satisfactory at all. The general recommendation is to spend 3-4 days there minimum ; some people who’ve spent a week there report feeling as though they’ve only scratched the surface. In light of that, I’d recommend taking Sedona off the table and planning a future trip when you can give it the time it deserves, and perhaps when your little one is old enough to enjoy it. Sedona has a lot to offer . Another possible alteration you might consider is swapping out Grand Canyon North Rim for the South Rim. If you don’t have lodging reservations at the North Rim by now, you’re unlikely to be able to get them. Grand Canyon South Rim has more to offer in the way of lodging , restaurants, and other visitor facilities. If you still have your heart set on seeing the North Rim, you might still be able to do so by taking a scenic flight by fixed wing airplane or helicopter . Mornings are generally the best time to fly for better light and less wind, so you could perhaps take a flight on your way back to Phoenix. Children 2 years old or less can fly free of charge as long as they are sitting on the lap of an adult. Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thank you for this! We’ll be staying in Page for about six days in late May. It was so convenient since the Grand Canyon, Zion, Monument Valley, and other national parks are within reasonable driving distances. I’m also looking forward to checking out the trading posts and other places nearby as well.

Are there any drop-in tours for Antelope Canyon or is it best just to book it in advance? Also, aside from Into the Grand, any other restaurant recommendations you would suggest?

Hi Georgia! Hope you’re looking forward to your visit. When doing day trips to the various locations around Page it is important to keep an eye on the time, because you want to make sure you’re back to base well before sunset. Nighttime driving is dangerous in this part of the U.S. due to lack of ambient lighting on local roads, and the possible presence of deer, elk, free range cattle, and even wild horses. Sunrise occurs at about 5:15 AM, sunset about 7:30 PM Page, AZ, time. Going back and forth into Utah, and into Monument Valley, remember that they DO observe Daylight Savings Time, but Page, AZ DOES NOT. Therefore, you will “lose” an hour traveling from Page, AZ, to UT and the rez, then “gain” it back returning to Page. With Antelope Canyon, you absolutely must have advance reservations ! In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if tours were sold out for May already. If that’s the case, consider touring one of several alternate slot canyons that are just as beautiful, but far less crowded. Other restaurants you might try in Page, AZ, that might not have been listed in the article that are good are State 48 Tavern, Big John’s Texas BBQ, the Birdhouse, and one that is in the process of opening that I’m anxious to try is Rim View Terrace. My personal favorite is Blue Buddha, ’cause I LOVE sushi, but they do serve other aka cooked things. Ask at your hotel for other recommendations, too. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Best blog On this topic and I have ready many. Thanks!!! Now my trip will be super amazing.

Thank you so much Stephanie!

Hi, my friend and I are planning to stay in Page, AZ for 2 nights March 23rd-March 24th. We are driving in from Los Angeles on the 23rd and plan to visit Horshoe Bend when we arrive. If all goes as planned we would be arriving mid afternoon. Would this be a good time to visit Horseshoe bend? Will there be parking? On the following day we plan to take the upper antelope tour around late morning early afternoon. I think the tour is only 2 hrs long. What would you recommend we do after that? And should we expect the weather to be cold?

Please advise , thank you!

Hi Mary, During the time you’re visiting, the main parking lot of Horseshoe Bend is closed between the hours of 10:00 AM-5:00 PM. During that time, visitors are required to park in an alternate area, and take a shuttle to the overlook for $5/person. If you don’t wish to bother with all that, you might consider visiting Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise on one of your mornings in Page, AZ. Then, the normal parking area will be open and you can visit at your leisure. Plus you won’t have as many people to contend with. Following your Antelope Canyon tour, other activities you may wish to partake of include, but are not limited to: visiting the John Wesley Powell Museum or the Navajo Village Heritage Center , taking a tour of the Glen Canyon Dam , enjoying one of several easy but scenic hikes in the area, or taking the Lakeshore Drive loop that parallels Lake Powell near the Lake Powell Resort and Marina complex. As for the weather, yes, cooler temperatures are the norm in March. In Page, AZ, you can also expect it to be windy. Pack a few pieces of warmer clothing just in case, but don’t be surprised if you experience a little “teaser” of spring weather while you’re here, too! Start monitoring Page, AZ, weather right about now to best gauge what to expect. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hello, We’re visiting in March and wondered if the “New” Wave is still accessible? Thanks!

Hi Cathy, and thank you for your inquiry. The “New” Wave should be accessible at the time of your visit, but the roads there are prone to washing out in the event of heavy rains or snow. If you encounter any signs explicitly stating “no admittance,” or the roads look dodgy in any way, skip it. There’s plenty more to see and do in Page, AZ! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi. I’ve been reading a lot of your posts and think I have worked out a good trip with your advice 🙂 But I am needing help deciding between two options on Day 3. I”m excited to be visiting the area in September of this year. I’ve never been to the Grand Canyon or anywhere in Arizona actually! Here are my current thoughts:

Day One: We arrive in Flagstaff at noon. Plan to drive to the South Rim, explore and stay overnight. Day Two: Explore South Rim a little more, leave there mid-afternoon to drive to Page and stay in Page overnight. Day Three: Take a slot canyon tour – leaning toward Canyon X or Secret Canyon. Would like to also see Horseshoe Bend. Thinking the combo Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon/Overlook combo is the way to go. Then drive that evening to St. George, UT and stay overnight. Day Three ALTERNATIVE: Take a slot canyon tour and do the Horseshoe Bend Glen Canyon Float Trip. Stay overnight again in Page. Day Four: We need to be in Las Vegas by mid-afternoon to meet friends flying directly there. So either we’d be driving from St. George or from Page depending on what we decide on Day 3. Thoughts?

Hi Tracy and welcome to the forum! Your trip is very well planned, but seeing as though this might be a “once-in-a-lifetime” or at least once in a blue moon opportunity, I’d recommend the “alternative” plan for Day 3 that has you taking the Glen Canyon Float Trip. However, I’d reverse the order in which you take your specified activities, namely, do the early morning departure of the Glen Canyon Float Trip , which would check in at 6:00 AM and have you back to Page, AZ, at about noon, then do a slot canyon tour in the afternoon. That way, you could make the drive to St. George with daylight to spare after your slot canyon tour concludes (the drive from Page, AZ, to St. George, UT is ~2.5 hours). Another option would be to take your slot canyon tour in the afternoon after driving in from Grand Canyon South Rim. Doing the Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon & Overlook combo tour would certainly save you the hassle of dealing with the parking situation at Horseshoe Bend, plus Secret Canyon (aka “ Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon “) is a beautiful slot canyon and fairly easy to hike. If you opt to make the drive to Las Vegas on Day 4, you could get an early start out of Page, AZ, and make a short detour through Zion National Park. That would add another 90 minutes or so onto a 4.5 hour drive, but the scenery is well worth the time spent. Whatever you decide, be sure that all your driving is done during daylight hours. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the country due to lack of ambient lighting on local roadways, plus the possible presence of deer, elk, free range cattle, and even wild horses in the area. In September, sunrise occurs at approximately 6:00 AM and sunset occurs around 6:30 PM. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Just got back from my trip to the area. We spent a day and a half at the Grand Canyon, drove to Page with a stop for Navajo Tacos and Beef Stew at Cameron Trading Post and did the Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon (Secret Canyon) and Horseshoe Bend Overlook Combo. It was fabulous!! We loved our guide and learned so much about the area. Finished up in St. George UT which was also amazingly beautiful before heading to Vegas. Thank you for your advice. It was a trip of a lifetime!!

Hi again Tracy! Thank you so much for taking the time to post feedback about your trip. We’re so glad you enjoyed it 🙂 We hope you get a chance to return to the area when you can spend more time and perhaps “test drive” our 14-Day American Southwest Vacation Itinerary ! Take care and continued safe travels, Alley

Thanks for providing information on those 2 parks.. Mesa Verde looks very interesting. I’ll start on modifying out lodging.

Thanks for providing valuable insight…

Jose, You’re welcome, please don’t hesitate to contact us again if we can be of further assistance! Alley 🙂

I really appreciate your feedback.

Darn, I forgot to provide important piece of info. We will be driving in from Florida. Arriving on Monday, 03/18. Returning on Friday, 03/22.

Recap: Day 1- GC, stay overnight. Day 2 – GC, stay overnight. Day 3 – drive to page, Antelope Canyon – Horseshoe Bend. Stay overnight. Day 4 – drive to Monument Valley. Take tour. Stay overnight.

Day 5 – depart MV. Not sure what else to visit nearby. Any suggestions? Late afternoon, visit Four Corners Monument. Then back to Florida.

Should I stay just one night in the GC and add another stop? Perhaps I’m missing a location, I haven’t thought of. My current reservation could be modified. I don’t mind making changes.

Thanks again. Really appreciate all the support you provide to everyone on this platform…

I’ve been doing lots of research on an upcoming trip on March 18 – March 22. I’m looking for some recommendations on how to plan.

Here’s the plan.

Day 1: (GC South) Arrive mid-day, check in, relax, view sunset. (Lodge already booked)

Day 2: (GC South) View sunrise, relax and wonder around all day.

Day 3: (Page, AZ) Depart early from GC, drive to Page, AZ. Stop at Horseshoe bend, then mid-afternoon lower Antelope Canyon, rest of the day – wonder round.

Day4: (Monument Valley, UT) Depart Page, drive to MV. Drive the 17 mile loop. Take a tour (jeep or horseback. Any recommendations on tour company) Check into The View, relax, visit Forrest Gump Hill.

Day5: Unknown. Should we stay longer at a previous location or explore a new one?

Thanks in advance,

Jose O, Your trip is very well-planned and it’s good that you’ve factored in some “down time.” On day 2 at the Grand Canyon, be sure to concentrate your sightseeing on the Grand Canyon Village Historic District and the Hermit’s Rest/West Rim Drive. Both areas are served by a free hop-on/hop-off shuttle system. On your drive day to Page, plan on stopping at the Grand Canyon viewpoints on the East Rim Drive since you’ll have to travel that way anyway. At Horseshoe Bend, the main parking lot will be closed during the time of your visit due to some construction projects taking place. You’ll need to park your vehicle at an alternate lot, then use a $5/person shuttle to get to the overlook. Horseshoe Bend parking lot closure occurs from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM, so if you happen to arrive after 4:00 PM, you’ll be able to go to the parking lot in your own vehicle, if there is space available (oftentimes, there’s not [“ Help! There’s No Place to Park at Horseshoe Bend “]). One important piece of information that’s missing from your correspondence, though, is where you’re driving in from? If you’re using Las Vegas as your “staging city,” you could spend that 5th day in Zion National Park. It’s about a 3.5 hour drive from Monument Valley. For lodging, look to Springdale, UT , not only for ample choices of hotels, but close proximity to Las Vegas (~3 hours). If you are driving back to Phoenix at the end of your trip, you could devote your extra day to exploring Sedona, AZ. Sedona is also about a 3.5 hour drive from Monument Valley. Phoenix would then be about a 2-hour drive from there. Sedona AZ hotels The downside to either place, Zion or Sedona, is that you’ll wish you had more time there. Both areas are huge and have lots of things to see and do. Visitors report spending 4-5 days in both areas and feeling as though they could have spent two or three weeks! Since you appear to already have lodging booked, it may be somewhat difficult to alter your plans, but you may consider modifying your itinerary as follows: Day 1 – drive to GC, stay overnight Day 2 – drive to Monument Valley, stay overnight Day 3 – drive to Page, tour Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon, stay overnight Day 4 – drive to Zion or Sedona, overnight Day 5 – second night in Zion or Sedona But again, if it means totally upending your existing plans, then by all means, stick with what you have. You’ll have a perfectly wonderful time regardless! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley! We’re 2 adults planning a road trip from Austin, Texas to Los Angeles. We haven’t picked dates yet but it will be sometime in late March or beyond into April or May and it looks like we are going to have start booking tours now :-X since apparently everything is already getting booked for the year. We are thinking of doing a two-week trip, where we take one week to drive from Austin through NM and AZ to see the sights, and a second week to drive from AZ to LA and stay in California for a few days. We were originally going to drive back from LA but now I am thinking we’ll rent a car and drive one direction to get all the sites in and then fly back to TX on the last day of the 2-week trip. Otherwise, we will have to extend into a 3rd week or forego some of the sites we want to see.

Here’s my question: We’re definitely going to the Grand Canyon, but I’d like to come up to see at least Horseshoe Bend Overlook and Antelope Canyon. Is 2 full days enough? Sleeping 3 nights?

I am thinking we drive into Flagstaff AZ in the evening on Night 1 (probably from Albuqueque NM). Sleep. Drive to the Grand Canyon on Day 2 and spend all day there. Drive up to Page from the Grand Canyon on Night 2 to sleep. Day 3, spend half the day at Horseshoe Bend and half the day at Antelope, then sleep in Page the last night and drive out to California the next day.

Any advice?

Hi AK (Hey,m I’m AK too!) – You are correct that things are already booking up for the spring break period, so it’s good that you’re already making plans. First off, I’d recommend verifying whether doing a one-way car rental is going to be feasible, cost-wise. Oftentimes, rental car outlets will charge some pretty hefty fees for this, so be sure to check on this before you commit. Regarding your main inquiry, 2 days/3 nights is sufficient to see the Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend. Instead of staying in Flagstaff that first night, I’d recommend going all the way to the Grand Canyon since it’s only another 90 minutes further (~6 hours from ABQ to GC). Being on the canyon rim is most desirable so you can experience sunrise and/or sunset there. Stay in the park (Grand Canyon Village) if possible; if nothing is available there, then try for something in Tusayan/GC Village South. Grand Canyon hotels Spend the next day sightseeing in the immediate vicinity of Grand Canyon Village, maybe hit some of the viewpoints on the Hermit’s Rest/West Rim Drive on the free shuttle. Depending on your preference/time frame, you could spend that 2nd night at the Grand Canyon, or head up to Page, AZ, that afternoon, hitting Horseshoe Bend Overlook on the way into town. The drive from GC to Page is listed on Google Maps as 2.5 hours, but in reality, it ends up taking more like 3-4 due to the number of photo ops along the way, including the half a dozen-plus overlooks of the Grand Canyon, the Little Colorado River Overlook, the Cameron Trading Post, Chinle formation views… just to name a few. The main thing is to get to your destination by sunset. Nighttime driving is discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to lack of ambient lighting on local roadways, plus the possible presence of deer, elk, free range cattle and other animals you might collide with. The following day, tour Antelope Canyon (be sure you have a reservation) , maybe tour Glen Canyon Dam as well, overnight in Page . Then head to CA the following day. The order in which you visit Grand Canyon and Page can also be flip-flopped depending on lodging availability (or lack thereof) in either place. When you get your trip dates nailed down, check that first, then Antelope Canyon tour availability. Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels! Alley K 🙂

Hi Alley, I’m planning a trip from Florida to Page, AZ from May 2-7. I’m trying to figure out what’s the best itinerary. I want to visit the Grand Canyon South and/or North rim (bright angel point), antelope canyon, horseshoe bend and boat trip to rainbow bridge. Which airport should I fly into? Where should I go first? How many days should I spend in each destination? I thought of flying into flagstaff since it’s closer to the GC but I wasn’t sure if that was a good idea. I’m trying to come up with an itinerary so then I can start making reservations. Any help you can give me is very much appreciated! 🙂

Hello Vivian and thank you for your inquiry. Given your travel dates, that’s going to narrow down your Grand Canyon visit to the South Rim. The North Rim does not open until May 15th, but there’s still a way you might be able to see it – more on that in a minute. Flying into Flagstaff, AZ, is an OK option, but frankly, not the best. The only direct air service into that airport is from Phoenix, AZ, so you’ll have to connect through after getting in from Florida. Most visitors to this area tend to fly into Las Vegas, or Phoenix. Either airport is ~4.5 hours from Grand Canyon South Rim, or Page, AZ. As to which place to visit first, that should be planned around availability of lodging at Grand Canyon South Rim . Check that first. If availability doesn’t line up with that being the first stop on your trip, then make it the last stop. A typical itinerary for a 5-day visit is as follows: Day 1: Travel day to Phoenix or Las Vegas, overnight Day 2: Drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~4.5 hours), overnight at Grand Canyon Day 3: Explore Grand Canyon Village, Hermit’s Rest/West Rim Drive, maybe catch the IMAX movie (you could also do that on your way into GC Village) Day 4: Drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, 3-4 hours, take afternoon tour of Antelope Canyon , overnight in Page, AZ Day 5: Visit Horseshoe Bend at sunrise, take Rainbow Bridge Boat Tour , overnight in Page again Day 6: Drive back to Las Vegas or Phoenix. If you use Las Vegas as your staging city, you could include a short detour through of Zion on the trip back, which will add another couple hours onto your drive time. Fly home. Be sure to book all hotels and guided tours in advance of your arrival. Oh – regarding the North Rim: if you really want to see it for yourself, you might consider flying over it. Airplane and helicopter flights depart daily from Grand Canyon South Rim. If you decide to go that route, try to get the first flight of the morning for optimal lighting and lack of wind. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Thank you so much Alley! You are the best!

You’re welcome – have fun!

Thank you. Your advice was exactly what I was hoping for. What would you recommend if we are able to add another day/night to our trip?

Merry Christmas to you as well. Your advice is a great gift to all of us.

Hey Todd, glad to hear our suggestions helped! If you were to be able to free up another day/night, I would suggest adding it to Sedona. Sedona is the type of place one can spend 4-5 days and people still find themselves wishing they could have had more time. There’s lots to see and do there, including easy but scenic hikes, art galleries, shopping, backcountry jeep tours, even hot air balloon rides! For ideas on how to use another 24 hours in Sedona, go to http://www.VisitSedona.com If for some reason that does not appeal, then you could spend your extra day at Grand Canyon South Rim and use that time to visit the viewpoints on the Hermit’s Rest/West Rim Drive of the canyon . This section of the rim drive is closed to private vehicles, but is served by a free shuttle line. If inclined, you can hop-on/hop-off as you desire and hike between some of the viewpoints, then re-board the shuttle when you’re ready to head back to the Village. Thanks again and have a great day! Alley 🙂

My wife and I are planning a five day vacation with two adult children during the last week in March 2019 starting in Tucson. I would like to visit Sedona, Grand Canyon, Page, and Monument Valley but am open to other suggestions. Can you recommend an itinerary? We enjoy natural beauty and adventure.

Hi! Best options for visiting antelope and or horseshoe with a 6 ur old?

Hi Amy! Horseshoe Bend is open 24/7/365, so you can visit it anytime you wish, with your own vehicle. In theory, anyway… Parking has gotten to be something of a problem of late due to the ever-increasing popularity of the overlook. Depending on the time of year you’re visiting, you might have to consider alternate means of getting to the overlook , such as a shuttle service, or an overflight by plane or helicopter. If you do go there on your own, be sure you keep a close eye on your child as the majority of the overlook is unfenced and it’s a 700′ drop to the river. As for Antelope Canyon, since this attraction is on Native American Tribal Land, a licensed guide service is required to visit it. How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon As for which branch of Antelope Canyon is best for young children , a 6-year-old could probably handle the physicality of Lower Antelope Canyon; if you have any doubts about that, then choose Upper. Whatever you decide, Antelope Canyon tours must be reserved in advance of your arrival. Good luck, safe travels, and have a Happy Holiday Season! Alley 🙂

Thank you for all your information above. My mom and I are driving from Phoenix to Chicago for Thanksgiving in early November, we are starting off in Page with Horseshoe Bend Overlook, Antelope Canyon, Monument Valley… we’ll be heading north from there… can you make some recommendations for a scenic route/sites into SLC (not the Mighty 5 as did that a couple of years ago).

Hi Alley, Just found you amazing site! My husband and I are leaving next week for a hiking/photography trip. We will start in Las Vegas, drive to Snow Canyon/St George for 3 nights. Head to Zion for 2 nights, then to Bryce for 2 nights. From Bryce we will head to Page. Can you tell me the best route to Page? We would like to see (and possibly walk/hike a little) in the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. I am very confused…is the monument in Kanab? I keep googling it and get so many different answers… 1. please help with any suggestions on what to see driving from Bryce to Page…we have the entire day 2. I have had Antelope Canyon on my bucket list for years and have just read about Secret Canyon, also a slot canyon near Page which is much less populated. Have you been there? Can you compare to Antelope Canyon? We will have 2 full days in Page. Should we go to Secret Canyon and Antelope? 3. I will take any suggestions you may have for Zion, Bryce and Snow Canyon too! Thank you in advance for your help! With Great Appreciation, Melissa

I will be traveling to Page with my husband and two teenage sons, arriving late on Dec 22nd. We will have 1 1/2 days in town before traveling to Phoenix. While in Page, we plan to see Lower Antelope Canyon as well as Horseshoe Bend. No other plans yet, but certainly welcome any suggestions! From what I’m seeing online, it sounds like we can visit Horseshoe Bend either day (12/23 or 12/24) since there is no tour, and the recommendation is to go earlier in the day, both to avoid crowds and to enjoy better sunlight on Horseshoe Bend.

I have two questions I wanted to ask: 1) When is the best time of day to plan to be IN Lower Antelope Canyon given the time of year? The tours provide a check-in time and tour depart time so I’m trying to select a time that will ensure we are IN the canyon at the best time. 2) I see that both Ken’s and Dixie’s offer tours throughout the day, though Ken’s offers a Deluxe tour with a smaller group of 6 people. Is it worth it to pay extra for the smaller crowd at that time of year?

Thanks for any suggestions you can offer. Julie

Hi Julie and thank you for visiting our site. The time of year you’re traveling is considered “off-season,” so you’ll enjoy benefits such as cooler temperatures and fewer people in Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend. Since crowds will most likely be smaller at that time of year, I don’t see the need to pay extra for the “deluxe” tour of Lower Antelope Canyon. If you have the budget/inclination to go for a tour that guarantees smaller groups, you might want to tour Antelope Canyon X instead. It is similar to Lower Antelope in that it involves some stair climbing and moderate exertion, but group sizes are deliberately kept under 10 people. Due to shorter daylengths in December, optimal time to tour any slot canyon in Page, AZ is between 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM. Because of the weather and lack of demand, water-based activities such as Lake Powell Boat Tours and Glen Canyon Float Trips are on seasonal hiatus. However, these tours might operate on an “on-demand” basis if weather conditions are favorable and a certain number of paying passengers are booked. You might contact the companies that operate these tours upon arrival in Page to see if there is any interest in running a tour. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley, Planning almost a week tour from Phoenix to Zion and back. Day 1- Drive from Phoenix around 8 am to Grand Canyon with stop for views and lunch at Sedona. Depart for Grand Canyon around 2 pm to hopefully catch sunset at Grand Canyon. Will stay overnight at Kachina Lodge for 1 night. Day 2 – Grand Canyon sunrise and after lunch head to Page to check out Sunset at Horseshoe Bend. Planning to stay 2 nights in Bend. Day 3 – Lower Antelope canyon tour and then take a day trip to Monument Valley for few hours. Is it worth driving to Monument Valley and just be there for about 3-4 hours and drive back to Page? OR is it better just to also view upper antelope canyon for a 4pm tour? Day 4 Depart from Page to Bryce Canyon for day trip and by afternoon , drive to Springdale for 2 night stay. Day 5- Zion Park full day Day 6 drive back from Zion to Phoenix to catch a evening flight back.

Hi Eileen, and thank you for visiting us. I think you’re trying to cram too many destinations into a short trip. First off, let’s talk about Sedona: this exquisite locale deserves at least 3 days of your time to do it justice, 2 if you’re pressed for time. Most visitors who do what you’re planning (a quickie “drive-by” sighting) end up wishing they could have spent more time there. If you really have your heart set on seeing Zion, you might consider flying out of Las Vegas instead of Phoenix. The drive from Zion to Phoenix will take you at least 7 hours. If you fly out of Vegas, you would only be facing a ~3 hour drive from Springdale. However, rental car drop-off fees can be pretty hefty for leaving a vehicle in a different city from where you picked it up, so the expense could override the convenience. Also, your plan to visit Bryce as a “day trip” en route from Page to Springdale is less than ideal. You’re looking at at least a 2.5 hour drive from Page to Bryce, but that figure is a “wheels turning, direct drive” estimate. That rarely happens because there is so much to see on the way there, so a more realistic expectation would be 3.5 hours or so. Then, you’re looking at a 2+ hour drive to Springdale. You’ll need to get an early start out of Page, AZ in order to pull this off and get any semblance of quality time in Bryce. Ditto if you really want to do that first leg (PHX-Sedona-GC) as you’ve planned it. Another consideration is daylength. I don’t recall seeing when you planned to travel, but if it’s in the near future, i.e., the fall-winter season, you need to keep in mind when sunrise and sunset are. Any long-distance driving should be completed well before sunset. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the US due to the lack of artificial/supplemental lighting on local roadways, and the tendency of deer, elk and other large, nocturnal wildlife to congregate around them after dusk. Doing a day trip to Monument Valley from Page is possible. I’ve done it myself with out of town guests due to the dearth of lodging options there. But here again, you’re looking at a long drive in order to make it happen, 2 hours, each way. Another way you might work Monument Valley into your itinerary without adding to your already substantial time on the road would be to fly over it. Fixed-wing airplane flights to Monument Valley are operated out of the Page Municipal Airport by Westwind Air Service . You can choose from a 90-minute overflight or a half-day air/ground combination tour with a landing at the Goulding’s Airstrip, and a Navajo-guided backcountry tour (scroll about half-way down the page on the link provided to get to the Monument Valley tour section of the site). If you’re physically up for doing Lower Antelope Canyon, stick with it. It is not necessary to tour both Upper Antelope Canyon and Lower AC in order to have a fulfilling visit to Page . Sorry to be a bit “all over the place” in providing my observations on your itinerary. If it were up to me, I would skip Sedona on this trip and plan to visit at a future date when you have enough time (3 days minimum) to take in all it has to offer. I would also use Las Vegas as your staging city and do something like this: Day 1 – drive from Las Vegas to Grand Canyon South Rim, stay 1 night Day 2 – drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, see Horseshoe Bend (if parking allows ), stay 1 night Day 3 – Visit Horseshoe Bend (if not able to do it day before) Morning flight tour of Monument Valley, drive to Bryce, overnight in Bryce Day 4 – drive from Bryce Canyon to Zion, stay 2 nights Day 5 – full day in Zion Day 6 – drive from Zion to Las Vegas to catch flight home Good luck, I know these are some hard choices! Please don’t hesitate to write again if we can be of further assistance. Alley 🙂

Hello Alley,

Thank you so much for all the information you have given above! I am travelling to Page from Las Vegas on 1st September. I would really appreciate your advise on the below itinerary:

Day 1: Leave Las Vegas between 7 am to 8 am for Bryce Canyon Get to Bryce Canyon no later than 1 pm, explore Bryce Canyon until 4 pm Leave for Page at 4 pm and get to the hotel by 7 pm

Leave Las Vegas between 7 am to 8 am for Hoover Dam Explore Hoover Dam till 11 am Get to The Paria Rimrocks-Toadstools Trail by 4 pm Leave for Page at around 6 pm

Day 2: Take half day Glen Canyon Dam Tour at 7 am Get to Horseshoe bend by 1.15 pm to 3.15 pm **Can we add something else too after the horseshoe trail??**

Day 3: 11 pm Lower Antelope Canyon tour Leave for Las Vegas at around 1 pm

Thank You, Saloni

Dear Saloni, Hello and thank you for visiting today. Your proposal on Day 1 to drive from Las Vegas to Bryce Canyon, then to Page is not feasible. It takes 4.5-5 hours to drive from Las Vegas to Page; then you’re looking at another 2.5-3 hours to drive to Page. Your “plan B” – drive from Las Vegas to Page after exploring Hoover Dam is more reasonable, however, you’ll want to time your drive so that you’re off the road by sunset, which, on September 1st, is 6:55 PM. I would shoot for leaving Hoover Dam a bit earlier. On Day 2, you might find it difficult to visit Horseshoe Bend immediately after the float trip. Parking during the mid-day hours is extremely hard to come by, so you might time your visit there for first thing in the morning on Day 3, or take one of the hourly shuttles offered by Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tours (reservations suggested). If you are able to visit Horseshoe Bend that same afternoon, other activities you might consider for that afternoon include but aren’t limited to: visiting the John Wesley Powell Museum , doing a tour of the Glen Canyon Dam , taking one of several easy but scenic hikes in the area, or taking the scenic Lakeshore Drive around the Lake Powell Resort complex (entrance fee required). On your Lower Antelope Canyon tour, don’t be surprised if your departure ends up being slightly later than 11:00 AM. The drive from Page to Las Vegas typically takes ~5 hours, and sunset occurs there at 7:15 PM local time. Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hello! Can you tell me in which Canyon the beautiful photo at the top of the page was taken? I am trying to decide between the typical Antelope Canyons or the other less traveled slot canyons as a photographer. TIA!

Hi Heather! If you mean the view looking up toward the topside of the slot canyon on this page, that’s Antelope Canyon. However, you may wish to give serious consideration to one of several alternate slot canyons in the area that are just as beautiful, but a lot less crowded, including, but by no means limited to: – Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon – Antelope Canyon X – Cathedral Canyon – Rattlesnake Canyon – Mountain Sheep Canyon – Wind Pebble Canyon – Ram’s Head Canyon – Waterholes Canyon For more information, check out “ Antelope Canyon Alternative Tours .” Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Hi – our family of 5 is planning to visit Northern Arizona in mid-April 2019. Our kids will be 8 1/2, 8 1/2, 10 1/2. We are planning to spend some time in Page between our visits to Zion and Grand Canyon. We would love to do a half day float trip and a slot canyon tour – I didn’t realize that there were better options to Antelope Canyon such as the Cathedral Canyon tour. Are float trips running in April? If we were in Page for a full day and a half day, what would the best itinerary be?

Thanks! Anne

Hi Anne and thank you for your inquiry, April is a nice time to visit Northern Arizona – usually. The occasional late season snowstorm does roll through, so have a couple of items of warmer clothing in your luggage, just in case. During the month of April, the Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip runs once daily, at 10:00 AM (check-in required at 9:00 AM), and returns at ~3.30 PM. Therefore, you’ll want to have at least 1 and 1/2 days in Page, AZ in order to do it, plus a slot canyon tour. As for the best order in which to take the tours, that depends on your itinerary. If you’re coming down to Page, AZ from Zion, it’s about a 2-hour drive, but keep in mind that Utah will be on Mountain DAYLIGHT Time, whereas Arizona will be on Mountain STANDARD Time. Utah will be one hour ahead of Arizona, so you’ll “gain” an hour going from one state to the other. Making a 9 AM check-in for the float trip wouldn’t be that hard to do. If you’re going from Grand Canyon to Page, AZ, they’re on the same time, but the drive from GC to Page is longer, ~3.5-4 hours (I know Google Maps states it as 2.5 hours, but that’s not factoring in the many stops people tend to make on that leg of the drive). In that case, that 9 AM check-in for the float trip would require a really early morning, which your kids probably wouldn’t like LOL. Hope that clears things up. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley, thanks much.

Few more…..

What is the temperature like for first week of Dec? Estimated.

Can I have the location for Steel Arch Bridge – the one i can find is on US89A – different route from US89 from South Rim to Page? Same for Painted Desert – which I can find is on US77 and requires 2.5hr from US64 X US89

Once again, thanks for all your guidance…

Hi Alley thanks for the clarifications. Glen Canyon is my stop before leaving Page to LV.

1 more – worth to do Upper Antelope on Sun 3pm?

Have a great weekend.

Hi Alley, thanks for your reply. I lost your sister site so I’m going to continue from here.

Now I change my itinerary to focus on driving from LV to Hoover Dam to Grand Canyon village and stay overnight there.

Day 2 – will drive from hotel to Page passing few more view points and Cameron Trading Post. However from there to Page, I’m not sure what else “must” visit.

Day 3 – Page to LV. In the morning i will go for lower antelope. In early Dec, which timing is good? Any issue for a 1.85m and 40 inch waist man to walk the lower antelope? LOL. Need to drive back to LV stopping at Glen Canyon Dam on the way.

Where shall i visit on way to page? Shall I visit horseshoe bend on day 2 afternoon or day 3 after lower antelope?

Much appreciated.

I’m planning to travel from LV to Page (staying overnight) in early Dec before heading back to LV. Appreciate if you can advise on my itinerary below:

Day 1 Leaving LV early morning say 730am to Hoover Dam. Reach Grand Canyon South Rim by 1pm with visits to few view points before heading to Page for overnight stay.

Day 2 Going for morning lower antelope then horseshoe bend before heading back to LV. Any other recommendations along the way back to LV? Like Glen Canyon Dam?

Much appreciated

Hi Jivin! I think I answered your inquiry on our sister site, but am happy to answer it again, so here goes: you’re trying to cram too much into a limited timeframe. It takes approximately 5 hours to drive from Las Vegas to Grand Canyon South Rim; it then takes 2.5-3 hours to drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page. The latter figure, however, is direct driving, which means wheels turning, no stops. That rarely happens because there is a LOT to see on the trip from GC to Page, such as over half a dozen Grand Canyon viewpoints, each with differing features and perspectives on the canyon; upon leaving the National Park, there are other sights to see on the Navajo Reservation, such as the Little Colorado River Overlook, Chief Yellowhorse’s Curio Stand, the Cameron Trading Post, Painted Desert formations, just to name a few. It would be a shame to pass all that by because you’re pressed for time. Another thing to keep in mind is that your days in December are going to be short: sunrise is at 7:30 AM, sunset is about 5 PM. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the country due to lack of artificial light on local roadways, and the possible presence of deer, elk and other wildlife you do not want to collide with. The drive back to Las Vegas from Page is also about 5 hours, longer if you were to make a detour through Zion National Park. My advice: either free up another night so you can spend the night at the Grand Canyon, then Page, or cut out one destination. If you’ve never been to the Grand Canyon, then, as much as I hate to say it, that should win out over Page, AZ. As a UNESCO World Heritage site, as well as one of the 7 Natural Wonders of the World, it’s a “must see.” Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend are “icing on the cake.” Good luck, I know it’s a hard choice. Best wishes for safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Jivin, Your modified plan sounds much better. Still, avoid the temptation to “overthink” them. On Day 2, for example, driving from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, you’ll find no shortage of photo ops once you head North on US89, but none are a “must visit” per se. For example, there is a large swath of Painted Desert type rock formations on this leg of the drive, as well as curio stands run by the Navajo Indian tribe members. If you want to stop, go ahead and do so; if not, keep on driving. Just don’t drive onto private property or unmarked roads. One stop that I rank as a “must” just South of Page is “The Cut” overlook. It looks out over the Colorado Plateau, and the Colorado River bed as it cuts through the bedrock. Very dramatic, and very clearly marked. Horseshoe Bend can easily be visited on your way into Page as it’s just 5 miles South of town. As for which departure time is best for an Antelope Canyon tour, it depends on when you need to be back in Las Vegas. The drive from Page to LV takes ~4.5 hours, going direct. Allow for about 1 hour to visit Glen Canyon Dam and the Steel Arch Bridge, longer if you take a tour. Another thing to keep in mind is that in December, Las Vegas will be on is on Pacific Standard Time and Page will be on Mountain Standard Time. Nevada is one hour “behind” Arizona, so you will “gain” an hour passing from one state to another. Lower Antelope Canyon tours run ~2 hours long, so assuming you have to be back in Las Vegas by mid-afternoon, I’d say take the first available departure of the day so you don’t have to rush. Thanks for contacting us again, and be safe out there! Alley 🙂 P.S. 1.85 m height/40″ waist is no problem.

Hi. Me and my friends are planning for a trip to horseshoebend and sedona. I would like to ask if are there any tour buses from Las Vegas to Arizona either a day tour or we can stay overnight. Would it be best if we are all flying to Arizona from our state of origin or just travel from LV to Az? If ever, do you know any tour buses or agency that would help us with our tour ? It will be much appreciated. Thanks

Hi Tiffany, If you absolutely must rely on a guided tour to accomplish your goals, be aware that your options will be limited. If at all possible, arrange to rent a car and drive yourself to Sedona and Page, AZ. That will afford you the most freedom and flexibility. If that’s not an option, there are some guided tour packages that will get you not only to Sedona and Horseshoe Bend, but also Antelope Canyon and Monument Valley. This package from Viator, for example, encompasses 3 days and 2 nights of touring, with overnight accommodations included ->: Viator 3-day Sedona, Monument Valley, Antelope Canyon tour TakeTours also offers a 2-day package that would include Antelope Canyon, Horseshoe Bend and Sedona ->: 2-Day Antelope Canyon, Horseshoe Bend and Sedona Tour from Las Vegas If the prospect of being on the road that long does not appeal, you might also consider Grand Canyon/Scenic Airlines’ Combination Air/Ground Tour from Las Vegas to Antelope Canyon These are just a few examples of available tours out of Las Vegas. Bear in mind that our suggesting them does not constitute an endorsement, it is merely information. Again, if you want to be able to call your own shots on this trip, the best way to do it is to do your own driving. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

I am planning to visit Arizona from September 14 to 17. We will be staying in Sedona and are planning to drive to the Grand Canyon and Page. I want to see the Grand Canyon South Rim, West Rim, Horseshoe Bend, and Antelope Canyon. I also wanted to do at least 1 hike in Sedona. Originally I had planned to drive back to Phoenix on 9/16 because I wanted to stay in the city for 1 night but I’m not sure if I can pack Grand Canyon and Page in 1 day. If you don’t think that’s possible what do you think of this itinerary:

9/14/18: Arrive in Phoenix at 3:30 pm and drive to Sedona. Will be staying in Sedona 9/15/18: Drive to the Grand Canyon and explore South and West Rims Drive back to Sedona 9/16/18: Drive to Page and explore Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon Drive back to Sedona 9/17/18: Devil’s Bridge Hike Drive back to Phoenix to take a 6pm flight

If I have a flight that comes in at around 10 AM on Tuesday August 14 and leaves at 8 PM on Thursday August 16, do you think it would be possible to fit in Monument Valley, the antelope canyon tour, and a visit to the Horseshoe Bend? This is what I had in mind: Day 1 (Aug 14) – Drive from Phoenix to Page in the early morning, check into hotel at Page around 3 or 4 pm, and then visit Horseshoe Bend Day 2 (Aug 15) – Upper Antelope Canyon tour at 8:30/9 AM, and then drive to Monument Valley during the day time. Arrive at Monument Valley and stay over night Day 3 (Aug 16) – drive back to Phoenix early in the morning from Monument Valley, and drop off rental car at Phoenix airport for flight at 8 PM

Please let me know what you think and what your suggestions are! Again, thank you so much!! 🙂 Natalie D.

Hey Natalie, Check out my response to your inquiry from 6/23 – sorry for the delay in getting back to you 😉 Alley

I am planning to fly in to Phoenix on August 14 (Tuesday) at 8AM and fly back on August 16 (Thursday) at 8 PM, but my friend and I want to visit the Horseshoe bend, take the Upper Antelope Canyon tour, and visit Monument Valley as well. How should we go about this and plan our trip? Would this be doable? Really would like some of your recommendations. Thank you so much! 🙂 Natalie D.

Hi Natalie and thank you for visiting our site. I’m afraid that visiting Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon AND Monument Valley is going to be pushing it with the limited timeframe you have, but, as they say, where there’s a will (and a patient driver), there’s a way. 8/14: Assuming your flight gets into Phoenix on time, and it takes 60-90 minutes to pick up your rental car, you should then begin the drive to Page, AZ (where Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon are located). The drive takes approximately 4.5 hours, but that’s wheels turning, driving direct, which rarely happens. There are a lot of scenic views, historic attractions and other points of interest that will no doubt pique your curiosity and warrant a photo stop, so, don’t be surprised if the trip ends up taking more along the lines of ~6 hours. That would get you into Page, AZ at approximately 4 PM. If you want, you could hit Horseshoe Bend on the way into Page since it’s just 5 miles South of town. However, mid-afternoon tends to be quite busy, and hot, so you may want to save this stop for first thing the next morning. Overnight in Page, AZ 8/15: The next morning, rise early, and if you didn’t visit Horseshoe Bend the day prior, visit it then. Proceed to Antelope Canyon on US98 and take a morning tour. How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon After your Antelope Canyon tour, continue on to Monument Valley. The drive to Monument Valley from Page, AZ typically takes 2 hours, but plan on taking a little longer for the reasons given for the drive from Phoenix to Page. Another consideration: Monument Valley, which is on the Navajo Reservation, observes Daylight Saving Time, whilst Page, Arizona does not, so you will “lose” an hour going from one place to the other. Keep that in mind if you plan for any time-sensitive activities or tours in Monument Valley . If you can find lodging in Monument Valley , you could spend the night there. In the likely event Monument Valley hotels are sold out, your next best option would be to stay in Kayenta, AZ , ~30 miles South of Monument Valley. Another option? Simply go back to Page, AZ. Just try to avoid driving at night due to the lack of supplemental artificial lighting on local roads, and the possible presence of deer, elk and other wildlife. 8/16 – Drive back to Phoenix. Time/inclination permitting, you might make a detour through Sedona, Arizona. If the prospect of doing all that driving doesn’t appeal to you, you might consider booking lodging for 2 nights in Page, AZ, and on the morning of 8/15, fly over Monument Valley. Fixed-wing airplane flights depart from the Page Municipal Airport daily, weather permitting and possibly contingent on a certain number of passengers booked. Tour flights are typically about 90 minutes long. For more information, visit Westwind Air Service . Hope that helps — good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

I am planning to do this following itinerary On August 14 (Tuesday) to August 16 (Thursday) and I wanted to know if this is doable and what your thoughts and recommendations are: Day 1 (Aug 14) – Drive from Phoenix to Page in the early morning, check into hotel at Page around 3 or 4 pm, and then visit Horseshoe Bend Day 2 (Aug 15) – Possibly a Lake Powell tour in the morning, and then an Upper Antelope Canyon tour at 2:30 PM, and then drive to Monument Valley. After visiting Monument Valley, drive back to Page Day 3 (Aug 16) – drive back to Phoenix early in the morning, and drop off rental car at Phoenix airport

I would really appreciate any of your suggestions! Thank you so much!! 🙂 Natalie D.

Hi Natalie! I’d recommend making a small change to your itinerary, especially on Day 2. The drive to Monument Valley takes 2 hours one way, and after doing a Lake Powell boat tour and touring Antelope Canyon, trust me, you’ll be in NO mood to make a 4 hour drive. What you might consider doing is either: 1. Investigate the possibility of staying there overnight. Lodging in that area is scarce, certainly, but if you were able to secure a room there, that would allow you to experience sunset in Monument Valley, which is absolutely magical. Hotels in the immediate vicinity are The View Lodge and Goulding’s Lodge . If unable to obtain lodging there, check the nearby towns of Kayenta, Arizona or Tuba City, Arizona. It would then be about a 5-hour drive to Phoenix the following day. 2. Abandon plans entirely to make the drive to Monument Valley on Day 2 and instead fly over it on Day 3. Fixed-wing airplane flights depart daily, usually first thing in the morning, from the Page Municipal Airport. Flight length is approximately 90 minutes and the tours are offered by Westwind Air Service . The drive from Page to Phoenix will then take approximately 4.5 hours. Hope that helps and that you have a wonderful trip! Alley 🙂

We’d like to visit Glen Canyon, horseshoe bend, and lower & upper Antelope canyon. How much time (how many days do we need?

We are planning on staying in Page for two nights from saturday afternoon (9/1/18) (around 3pm) until Monday noontime (9/3/18)

Please advise. Thank you!

Hi Gen and thank you for your inquiry. 2 days is sufficient to tour all of the attractions you list, but one thing I should point out is that it is not necessary to visit both Lower and Upper Antelope Canyon in order to have a fulfilling visit to Page. If you’re physically up for touring Lower Antelope, I would stick with that and use the extra time to hit some other attractions in the area, such as the John Wesley Powell Memorial Museum or the Glen Canyon Dam/Carl Hayden Visitors Center. The New Wave might also appeal if you want to do a little more hiking. Be sure to book all accommodations and guided tours in advance of your arrival. Best wishes for safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi, I`m planning to do the following itinerary in the first week of August. I wanted to know if you understand this is doable and also if the weather will be too hot for hiking: Day 1 – Drive from Vegas to Grand Canyon (South Rim) in the afternoon and stay overnight in the Park Day 2 – Day in the Grand Canyon and drive to Page in the end of the day Day 3 – Lower Antelope Canyon tour and horseshoe bend – overnight in Page (is Page the best place to stay?) Day 4 – Drive to airport (either Vegas or Flagstaff) I`m flexible to do all this at a different time of the year if August weather is not pleasant. Appreciate any suggestions! Thank you 🙂 Suellen

Hi Suellen and thank you for your inquiry. August weather is hot, and it’s also monsoon season, which means afternoon rainstorms roll in with some degree of regularity. This can heighten flash flood danger, and often results in the cancellation of slot canyon tours, but again, that’s a mostly afternoon phenomenon, so booking your Antelope Canyon tour in the morning is a good move. As for whether your itinerary is “doable,” it definitely is. Just make sure on Day 2 that you time your trip so that you don’t end up driving after sunset, 1. because local roads are very dimly lit, sometimes not at all, 2. deer, elk and other wildlife tend to graze near roads at night, and 3. you can easily hit Horseshoe Bend on your way into town and the pre-sunset hours are generally regarded as the best time to visit With extra time on Day 3, you might consider taking the Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip or perhaps a tour of Glen Canyon Dam. If you take us up on those suggestions, you should plan on staying in Page, AZ that night. On Day 4, I would recommend driving back to Las Vegas instead of Flagstaff. Even through Flagstaff is closer, you cannot get any direct flights from there. You would have to fly into Phoenix, and make any outbound connections from there, which means changing terminals, transferring baggage and all those hassles. Rental car outlets also tend to impose pretty hefty surcharges for dropping vehicles anywhere other than where you picked them up from. It takes approximately 4.5 hours to drive from Vegas to Page. All that said, if you have the flexibility to travel whenever you wish, I would recommend delaying your visit until late-September or sometime in October. Temperatures cool off significantly then, not to mention crowds thin out slightly what with kids going back to school. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Dear Alley, In desperate need of your reply quickly please since I am running out of time. Our family is vacationing in Phoenix Wednesday May 16 – Sunday May 20th. I have purchased Upper Antelope Canyon tour tickets for Thursday afternoon. I have also made hotel reservation at South Rim for Thursday night. Plan on spending Thursday at Page and then head out in the evening to South Rim. We plan on spending Friday at South Rim. We have accommodations for Friday night and Saturday at Peach Spring to go white water rafting.

My only question is where should we spend Wednesday night? Sedona or Page? Our flight arrives on Wednesday at 1:00pm.

Option 1) I wanted to do some sight seeing in Sedona for the afternoon and head to Page in the evening to spend the night in Page in order to get a head start on Horse Shoe bend in the morning and do the antelope tour in the afternoon and the head to South RIm.

Option 2) Spend Wednesday afternoon and the night in Sedona and head out to Page on Thursday morning? Is there any other option?

Thank you so much for your time Sam

Hey Sam, Apologies for the delay in response to your itinerary. Both options are viable, but personally, I’d prefer option #1. Option #2 would have you doing ~5-6 hours driving in one day, which would run the risk of having to do part of the driving to the South Rim after sunset. We don’t recommend that due to the lack of light on local roads and the tendency for wildlife (deer, elk, etc.) to congregate around them at night. What raised more alarms for me is your logistics around the white water rafting trip at Peach Springs. It’s a lot of fun, but staying the night prior to it at the South Rim might not be the best idea. If I remember correctly, you have to check in at 7:00 AM at Hualapai Lodge for it, and it takes approximately 2.5 hours to drive over from Peach Springs. That means you’ll need to be “wheels up” at 4:30 AM from the South Rim in order to make it on time. Please be fully aware of all drive times before you commit to this plan. Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Thank You so much, Alley. All wise comments/advice. I have made course correction. 🙂

I want to plan a trip for a group of six. We all have always wanted to see Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon. We all have seen the Grand Canyon. We are thinking of going in May or June and plan to stay in Page so that it is less driving for us. Which tour would you recommend us to view so that we get to see both locations?

Hi Larissa and thank you for visiting our site! Good call on staying in Page, AZ. That will allow you to get the most out of your visit. Horseshoe Bend is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, so you may visit it whenever you wish, in your own vehicle. Although I wouldn’t necessarily recommend visiting at night LOL For Antelope Canyon, you need to decide whether you want to visit Lower or Upper Antelope Canyon. In a nutshell, Upper is the easier of the two, 100 yards long, flat the whole way; Lower is a bit longer and more physical, requires some stair climbing, stepping over a few boulders, etc. More detailed information, as well as authorized tour companies are provided in this article: How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon Be sure to book your Page, AZ hotel and your Antelope Canyon tour well in advance of your arrival. Both May and June fall in peak travel period for the area and both tours and hotels do book up. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

If upper Antelope Canyon is so easy and short why is the tour longer?

We are planning (family) to go to Page, Arizona to see Horseshoe bend and Antelope Canyon (upper and lower). Are you in Page? How can we register for the tour?

Hi Grace and thank you for visiting our site. Contact information for each of the tours should be provided via text link. If for some reason you can’t access them, let us know which tour you are specifically interested in and we will let you know who to contact 🙂 Alley

Hi Alley and team!

Me and my husband wanted to visit arizona this april 24-26, but we have a 2 years old son. Please advise us what is the best thing to do since we have a 2 years old with us, we will drive from las vegas and we want to visit hoover dam, grand canyon, horseshoe-bend and get antelope tours but regarding antelope which one is the best you recommend the upper or the lower antelope and also the best time to be there. Thank you so much!

Hi Lhea! Thank you for visiting our site and apologies for the delay in response to your inquiry. With a 2 year old in tow, I would recommend opting for Upper Antelope Canyon. It is short, easy and the most manageable option for families with toddlers. Lower Antelope Canyon has a lot of stairs, boulders and rock overhangs that could strike a little one being carried by a parent in the head. We’d hate to see that happen 😉 Whatever you decide, be sure to make reservations well in advance of your arrival. How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon Mid-day is generally regarded as the best time to visit, but those are peak hours for tourists, so those spots are probably sold out. Take whatever time slot is available and works with your schedule. There’s no such thing as a bad time to tour Antelope Canyon. Also, be sure to reserve your hotels if you haven’t already. With 2 nights to work with, I’d recommend spending one at the Grand Canyon, and another in Page. It takes approximately 4.5 hours to drive from Las Vegas to the Grand Canyon, not factoring in the stop at Hoover Dam, then another 2.5 hours to drive from Grand Canyon to Page (again, not factoring in stops), then the drive back to Las Vegas from Page takes 4.5 hours as well. The 2-year-old will no doubt influence the pace of your trip, so don’t be in a hurry, allow plenty of time for bathroom breaks, and sightseeing for yourselves. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

I’m heading to the lower antelope canyons this april and I was wondering what time would be great to capture the beautiful purple/orange colours the canyon can offer?

Thank you Arthur

Hi Arthur and thank you for your visit. Mid-day is generally regarded as the best time to see the slot canyons illuminated to full effect. Unfortunately, those time slots are always the first to get booked up, so check with the tour outfitters ASAP to see what’s available. How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon If the prime tour times are booked up, you have a few choices. You can a) tour at one of the off-peak times such as earlier in the morning or later in the afternoon; the colors will still be beautiful or b) tour a different slot canyon; there are actually many slot canyons in the area that are just as beautiful as Antelope Canyon but far less crowded. Antelope Canyon Alternative Tours Since your visit is soon, start making those calls or going online to check availability ASAP! Good luck and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley, Love this page – Such great information! We will be in Page on June 13-14. If we cannot get a tour for Antelope Canyon, which of the alternative do you recommend if we can only see one slot canyon? Thanks, Karen

Hi Karen, Thank you for your inquiry! Which “alternate” slot canyon you tour depends largely on your physical fitness level and how much exertion you’re willing to endure – or not endure. Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon for example is a 450′-long canyon, but doesn’t involve much in the way of uphill walking. It does require a 6-mile off-road ride in a safari truck to get to the canyon’s entrance. Antelope Canyon X does require some uphill/downhill trail walking, stair/ladder climbing and scrambling down some short rock faces in a few spots. Slots like Mountain Sheep and especially Cardiac Canyon require some more technical canyoneering moves and might be a little beyond the range of us “average Joe’s” and weekend warriors LOL. For more detailed information, read Antelope Canyon Alternative Tours on our sister site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.az There are some alternate slots not listed in the article, such as Wind Pebble Canyon, Ram’s Head Canyon and Ligai Si’Anii Canyon. These are managed by Ligai Si’Anii Tours out of LeChee, AZ. For more information on their tours, visit http://www.hikingslotcanyons.com Good luck and have fun! Alley 🙂

Hi Alley My husband & I are visiting friends in Chandler for a week. We plan to rent a car & take a couple of days to tour. Our plan is to drive to Flagstaff, making this home base & driving to tour lower Antelope Canyon & Horseshoe Bend on the same day. We also plan to visit GC as well. We will be there probably March 29th-31 WhT type of clothing do you recommend for Antelope Canyon? Any other advice on where to go while we are the would be much appreciated. Thank you for your help. Colleen

Hi Colleen and thank you for visiting our site. First off, using Flagstaff as a “base camp” for visiting the Grand Canyon and Antelope Canyon is less than ideal. It takes 90 minutes, each way to drive from Flagstaff to the Grand Canyon; then 2.5 hours, again EACH way, to get from Flag (that’s what we call it around here) to Page. Driving after sunset is strongly discouraged in this part of Arizona due to the lack of artificial/supplemental lighting on local roads. That means you’ll miss seeing sunset and sunrise in two of the best places on Earth from which to view them! If you’re not locked into your hotel reservations in Flag, you may want to explore options for staying closer to your two destinations. Grand Canyon Hotels Page, Arizona Hotels As for what kind of clothing to wear, in a word, layers, that can easily be shed if necessary. Flagstaff and Grand Canyon South Rim are 7,000′ Above Sea Level and Page is ~ 4,500,’ so you’ll start off in the morning wearing jackets, then as the day progresses and gets warmer, you’ll want to have something lighter on. Good footwear for walking is also a must. If you’re a “sandals 24/7” person, flip-flops aren’t that great around here, you’ll want to have something more substantial like Tevas, Chacos or Keens. Be sure you book your Antelope Canyon Tour in advance of your arrival. Hope that helps and that you have a wonderful time! Alley 🙂

HI Alley, My husband and I are planning a trip to Page AZ in beginning of April from Vegas. WE will start early morning from Vegas on Saturday and would want to start our journey back from Page to Vegas on Monday morning. I have searched all over the internet and is super confused now about planning my trip. Can you please help!

Thanks much in advance!

Dear Swati, Hi and thank you for contacting us. With two nights to work with, and since you’ve already been to the Grand Canyon, you might consider spending one of your nights in Zion National Park, provided you can get reservations. For one, it’s beautiful, and secondly, it’s right on your way. At this point in time, you’ll probably end up having to stay in Springdale, UT on the Western border of the park. If that’s indeed the case, then I’d recommend doing that on your second night. Since it’s only about 3 hours from Las Vegas instead of ~5 (as is the case with Page), that saves the shorter drive for “last” if you prefer. But again, it’s contingent on being able to get lodging reservations, which you might be too late for. In Page, activities you should consider a “must” are visiting the Horseshoe Bend Overlook and touring either Antelope Canyon or one of the other slot canyons in the area . If you decide to devote your two nights to the Page area, you might also consider taking part in the Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip or a Lake Powell Boat Tour . Hope that helps. Please don’t hesitate to contact us again if you have further questions! Alley 🙂

Hi Ally – i am trying to plan a 3 day trip (either flying into Vegas or Phoenix) to see horseshoe bend specifically.. but i am trying to come up with the best itinerary where i can see many other places (considering the south rim grand canyon, antelope canyon, zion, bryce cannon, monument valley and 4 corners). i realize i cannot see everything, but i would really like to see horseshoe bend for sure. Any recommendations ? I will be renting a car and driving from which ever airport is better depending on what i plan on seeing…. need recommendations!! thanks

Hi – planning to visit Page following a trip to Monument Valley in early June and wanting to make the most of our time and see both Antelope canyon and Horseshoe Bend (both from the look out area and from the river). Hoping you can give some guidance about drive times/route planning and what should be booked in advance. Many thanks!

Hi Cathy and thank you for your inquiry! It takes approximately 2 hours to drive from Monument Valley to Page, but all is not as it seems: Monument Valley is situated on the Navajo Indian Reservation, where Daylight Saving Time is observed. Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend are located near Page, AZ, where Daylight Saving Time is NOT observed, so — you will “gain” an hour as you pass from Navajo Indian Land to non-Native land. Since you will pass by the Navajo Tribal Park Entrance to Antelope Canyon on the way from Monument Valley, we recommend you take that tour prior to entering the town of Page, AZ and that you make reservations for your tour in advance. To see Horseshoe Bend from the Overlook area, you simply drive there at your leisure as it is open 24/7. To see it from the Colorado River, book the Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip with Wilderness River Adventures . Another element of your trip to book in advance: hotels, at every stop on your tour. June is peak travel season in Northern Arizona, and lodging will sell out soon if it hasn’t already. Take care and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Hi Alley I am trying to make a choice between Canyon X slot canyon and Horseshoebend Slot Canyon. I am interested in photography in the slot canyon. From this point of view can you advice which one of the two is preferable as I may have opportunity to cover only one of the two. A few pieces of advice on photography of lake Powell may also help me. I mean the time and vantage points etc.

Hi Pradeep, Both slot canyons are beautiful, but for photography, you might consider Antelope Canyon X. Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon (aka “Secret” Canyon) does not have any “chambers” like Antelope X does, it’s just one long slot. Antelope X, on select days during the summer months, features the light beams that Upper Antelope Canyon is so famous for. Whether they will show themselves during your visit depends on its timing, and is never guaranteed, but even without them, the canyon is regarded by many as just as beautiful as the main branches of Antelope Canyon. For photo tips not only on Lake Powell, but many scenic attractions in the Page, AZ area, go to VisitLakePowell.com/PhotoTips Have a wonderful and safe trip! Alley 🙂

Alley, you mentioned not driving in the dark in your last post, is there an issue with driving in the dark?

Hi John, We tend to discourage nighttime driving around here because most visitors who come from more populated areas are used to having their roads be fairly well lit. That’s not the case in this part of the country. Artificial/supplemental lighting is kept to a bare minimum, and many towns in Northern Arizona and Southern Utah are recognized as “Dark Sky” communities. Once the sun goes down, it gets REALLY dark. Another hazard is the wildlife: deer, elk and other animals tend to be nocturnal and like to graze by the roadways at night. Getting into a collision with one will wreck your car, and your vacation. From personal experience, I once drove from the Grand Canyon to Four Corners at night and literally saw my life flash before my eyes a few times! Long story short, nighttime driving is by no means forbidden by legal statute, but it’s best avoided if you can help it. Hope that sheds some “light” on the situation. Ha ha ha… Best regards and safe travels, Alley 🙂

Hi Alley I and a friend are planning a visit to Grand Canyon, attractions around Page and Monument Valley for landscape photography. We have a limited time though with us. We are self driving from Las Vegas on Day 1 morning to this area (hope to photograph Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend) night stay in Page, Day 2 happens to be a Sunday (probably slot Canyon photo tours aren’t offered on this day) we are reaching Monument valley in afternoon and night stay in Monument Valley. On Day 3 we are leaving Monument Valley after sunrise photography and driving to Page. Here we have booked Upper Antelope Canyon photo tour for afternoon and shall drive back to Las Vegas to reach in night. With your complete knowledge of the area can you help us fill in the destinations in our schedule – eg Horseshoe bend, Lake Powell, Slot Canyon(any not conventional one) etc. Thanks Pradeep

Are there self-guided tours of any of the slot canyons? If I read correctly, there are self-guided tours for Horseshoe Bend. We intend to travel in March 2018. Thanks.

Can you please help us know how to arrange tickets for the antelope canyon tours and the boat ride tour. We will be arriving May 23 in Page and have 2 full days, 24 & 25. Big bucket list area for my husband and I don’t want to leave it to chance. Would love to buy tickets to ensure we can go. I also don’t want to be taken advantage of. I very much appreciate your help.

Hi LuAnn and thank you for visiting. You’re definitely doing the right thing by planning your trip well in advance. For Antelope Canyon tours, you must first decide whether you want to visit Upper or Lower Antelope Canyon. In a nutshell, Upper is an easy 100 yard walk, Lower is 600 yards and requires navigating a few staircases and around some boulders. Once you have decided which branch to visit, make a reservation with whichever tour outfitter has availability for the time slot that works best for you. How To Book A Tour Of Antelope Canyon For the “boat ride,” I’m not certain whether you mean the Rainbow Bridge Boat Tour or the Glen Canyon Float Trip. They are similar in length, but go to different places. The Rainbow Bridge Boat Tour may require up to a 3-mile round-trip walk to see the bridge itself depending on the water level of Lake Powell. Simply visit the appropriate link to make reservations for the tour you desire. Lake Powell Rainbow Bridge Boat Tour Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip Be sure you make your hotel reservations in advance of your arrival as well. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Thanks for mentioning my web site!

You are welcome, Chris! Great work, BTW 🙂

Hello! I am taking my husband to Page for our 20 year anniversary, but neither of us have been to the area. I have reserved a lake view room at the resort and rented two kayaks. I am wondering if it is possble to explore Antelope canyon by kayak without joining a tour group. We are very athletically capable of captaining our own kayaks, but just need to know if it is allowed.

Hi Heather, Exploring Antelope Canyon by kayak is permitted, but you probably shouldn’t attempt to pilot your kayak all the way from Lake Powell Resort. There is a ton of tour and private boat traffic in the channel leading up to Antelope Canyon which could overwhelm your kayak and cause you to capsize. It would be safer to haul your kayaks to Antelope Point Marina and launch from there. Keep in mind that Antelope Point Marina is inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation area as well, so hang onto your receipt when you pay the entrance fee to get into Lake Powell Resort. It’s good for 7 days’ time. Congratulations on your anniversary and have a wonderful trip! Alley 🙂

Hi, My girlfriend and I are planning to go to Sedona and I was wondering if we need to pay a tour or guide to visit the red rocks formations or if we can access there by car. Also we might not have too much time since we will be arriving Sedona in the afternoon and leaving to Grand Canyon on the next morning.

Hi Omar, A guided tour is not required to visit the Red Rock formations of Sedona, but it certainly might help to have one in light of your limited time. Wasting time looking for sights you are not familiar with doesn’t really sound like an option. For suggestions of activities you might take part in, visit http://www.Sedona.net If you prefer to tour on your own, make plans beforehand to tour the Chapel of the Holy Cross, hike Oak Creek Canyon, shop Tlaquepaque or take a Pink Jeep Tour. 10 Best Sedona Sights & Landmarks The drive to the Grand Canyon the next day will take approximately 2.5 hours. Hope that helps, Alley 🙂

Hello! What is the best time of the year to visit antelope canyon and horseshoe bend? I would like to avoid the crowds but also get some amazing pictures.

Hello Yenh and thank you for your inquiry. If you would like to avoid crowds yet still get good photographs of Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon, we would advise you to visit during the winter months (November through February). You risk encountering inclement weather, up to and including snow, but as long as you are prepared with warm clothing, and a diligent eye on the weather, you should still be able to enjoy a fulfilling visit to the Page, AZ area, with fewer people to contend with. If the prospect of wintertime travel doesn’t appeal, late September through November offer nearly perfect daytime temperatures, and though local hotels and attractions will still be busy, it will be mostly adults out traveling as children are back in school. Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

Hello, I been wanting to go to the Antelope Canyon for a while now. So confused where to go and stay from NJ! Can you please help me?? Should I go to Phoenix? Then from Phoenix drive to Flagstaff or Page?? The 48 hrs. tour sounds very good to me.

Hi Sandra and thank you for your inquiry. Flying into Phoenix is a good option; but the slight majority of visitors choose to fly into Las Vegas. Either city is about a 4.5 hour drive from Page, AZ. Regarding where to stay, Page, AZ would be best as it would put you closer to Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend. Page, AZ has a wide variety of traditional hotels and vacation rental homes. Staying in Flagstaff would put you a 2.5 hour drive (one way) from Page, making for a long day behind the wheel if you choose to go that route. Hope that helps. Be sure to book your hotels, and make your Antelope Canyon tour reservations well in advance of your arrival. Good luck and safe travels! Alley 🙂

HI, I am planing a trip to Arizona with my friends on from May 4th returning on the 7th . Can we do 2 tours in one day ? Antelope Upper tour and Hoseshoe Bend , we’re thinking to stay in Sedona Friday’s night until Saturday , drive Saturday afternoon and stay close to the Canyon area and do both tours on Sunday since we are returning on Monday. Please let me know what you recommend . Thanks !

Hi Nana, So are you planning to visit the Grand Canyon at any point on your trip? It’s a definite must and is mid-way between Sedona and Page. An overnight there is best so you can enjoy sunrise and/or sunset. It takes approximately 3 hours to drive from Sedona to Grand Canyon South Rim, then another 2.5-3 hours to drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page. If you have already been to the Grand Canyon, then the itinerary you propose is doable. I’m assuming you’re flying out of Phoenix? If so, be sure to plan for 4.5-5 hours to drive back there from Page, AZ. Since your visit will occur during peak travel season, all arrangements should be made well in advance of your arrival, including hotels and Antelope Canyon Tours . Thank you for visiting and have a great day! Alley 🙂

I have been reading your page and want some advice on a possible trip.

We were looking forward to renting a motorhome and taking the kids on a 7-9 day long motorhome drive leaving from San Diego . Some places we wanted to cover are the Grand Canyon , Lake Powell and venture north into Idaho. What are your thoughts on locations we could do. I’m skeptical on things being closed due to Covid . But will be flexible on your advice .

Would you say a Tahoe and hotels would be better ? Open for suggestions please help.

Hi Felipe, With 7-9 days to work with, using San Diego as your “launch” point, I’d suggest taking Idaho off the table. It’s too far out of your way, and you’d end up missing out on so many sightseeing opportunities in Northern Arizona and Southern Utah. More on that in a minute… As for whether you go the motorhome route, or opt for a passenger vehicles and hotels, IMO that largely depends on when you were planning to travel. If, for example, your trip was planned for the winter months, I’d say ’86 the motorhome because many RV parks are either closed for the season, or have limited facilities. In the winter months, you’d also be limited to driving a winterized RV, which means no water hook-ups, which would be super-inconvenient if you were to land at an RV park whose shower house was also closed. In the summertime, you’d want to stay at RV parks with full electrical hook-ups, because the weather at most of the places you’d be visiting is hot. You’d definitely want access to reliable air conditioning, even at night. Now, if you were considering the RV rental thinking you’d save money on hotels, be sure that’s the case before committing. I’ve done my share of camping, and there are some places where RV park rates are on par with hotel prices. Plus there’s the matter of the extra gas you’d be consuming. If traveling by RV would be something of a novelty for you, I totally get that, but just make sure you go into it with reasonable expectations. Now, let’s talk about your itinerary. Again, if you use San Diego, CA, as your staging area, you could do something like this: Day 1 – Drive from San Diego to Laughlin, NV (~6 hours), overnight in Laughlin Day 2 – Drive from Laughlin, NV, to Grand Canyon South Rim (~4 hour drive), overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim Day 3 – Drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ (drive time 3-5 hours depending on whether AZ64 from Desert View Point to Cameron has been reopened by the time you visit), overnight in Page, AZ Day 4 – 2nd day/night in Page, AZ: visit Horseshoe Bend, tour Antelope Canyon ( if they’re reopened ), other places in the Page, AZ, you might go include, but are not limited to: – The Page Rim View Trail – Glen Can Dam/Steel Arch Bridge – Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains – Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook – Grand View Overlook Park – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock – Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (these are located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time) – Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum in Big Water, UT, ~20 minutes from Page, AZ Day 5 – Drive to Bryce Canyon National Park (~3 hours from Page, AZ), overnight in Bryce Canyon **if the Antelope Canyons remain closed at the time of your visit, you might consider touring Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT on this portion of your trip; a guided tour is recommended, for a list of tour companies, visit http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ : Help! My Tour Got Cancelled Day 6 – Drive from Bryce Canyon to Zion National Park (~2 hours), overnight in Springdale, UT, Hurricane, UT, or Kanab, UT Day 7 – 2nd day/night in Zion, lots of hikes and other activities to do in this area! Day 8 – Drive from Zion to Las Vegas, NV (~3-4 hours depending on where you stayed the night before), visit Valley of Fire State Park, overnight in Las Vegas Day 9 – Drive from Las Vegas to San Diego, CA (~6 hour drive) Trip map As you can see, there’s plenty to see and do in the immediate area of the Grand Canyon without trekking all that way into Idaho. Idaho is a beautiful state, don’t get me wrong on that, but it’s essentially another trip in and of itself. Besides, Idaho is right next to Montana and Wyoming, so you can easily dovetail it onto a trip to Yellowstone, the Grand Tetons, and Glacier. Save it for another time, perhaps when you can fly in/out of Salt Lake City, UT. Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays! Alley 🙂

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Navajo woman-owned Antelope Canyon tours celebrates 10 years of business

PAGE, AZ (AZFamily) — Millions of people from all over visit the swirling red rocks of Antelope Canyon every year.

Several different tour companies are available. One of them, a Navajo woman-owned business, just celebrated 10 years of business.

Leilah Young’s mother, Dixie, received hiking permits from the Navajo Nation for Antelope Canyon in 2014.

With only the help of family, she opened Dixie’s Lower Antelope Canyon Tours .

“She had no idea how to operate a business, but she went in there and believed in herself,” Young said. “Literally, she put up one of those tents, canopies with a plastic table and a couple of chairs. That first day she only had 12 visitors.”

Now, they give tours to over 300,000 people from across the world every year and can take 1,500 people on a tour daily.

“It’s amazing to hear that they plan their vacations around specifically seeing lower Antelope Canyon and it’s impressive what we’ve built,” Young said.

More than 4 million people visit the area annually.

Young is now CEO and said all the tourism has helped the city of Page and surrounding communities grow.

“I think in the last 10 years there’s been like 20 hotels that have popped up and these hotels are going up because of this slot canyon,” she said.

The Antelope Canyon tours also provide much-needed job opportunities for people on the Navajo Nation.

“We have an employee that actually drives two hours every day just to get to work,” Young said. “I’m just like ‘oh my goodness’ and that’s how scarce jobs are out on the Navajo Nation. We here want to share a part of our culture. We want to share a part of the Navajo Nation and how beautiful the Navajo Nation can be.”

The 10 years were celebrated with a ribbon cutting and art unveiling.

Young said that for the next decade, they want to continue to give back to their community, create more business opportunities and grow as a family company.

“I’m very proud of how far we’ve come. I’m very proud of how far we’ve come as a family. I’m proud of the things that we’ve been able to accomplish,” Young said.

Summer is the busy season, and tours are full daily, so their suggestion is to try to book your trip a month in advance. You can find out more about booking  here.

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Come prepared with flashlights and ghost stories. This mile-long lava tube north of Flagstaff can be one of the chilliest summer hikes in Arizona, hovering around 42 degrees.

Formed 700,000 years ago by a river of molten rock blasted from a volcanic vent in nearby Hart Prairie, the cave is an ice cellar beneath the forest floor.

Carry at least two sources of light and watch your footing. After squeezing through a narrow opening, you’re able to walk upright the rest of the way, so you’ll have time spin tales of ghosts and giant spiders lurking in the darkness.

Details: Drive 9 miles north of Flagstaff on U.S. 180 and turn left on Forest Road 245 (at mile marker 230). Continue 3 miles and turn left on FR 171. Drive 1 mile and turn left on FR 171B to the parking lot. 928-527-3600, www.fs.usda.gov/coconino.

Stop and smell the flowers at the Arboretum at Flagstaff

If hiking a dark, chilly lava tube seems intimidating, try the soft shagginess of the Arboretum at Flagstaff. Tucked away down a dirt road on Flag’s west side, the arboretum is a botanical garden, nature center and environmental education station sheltered in a ponderosa pine forest.

Spread across 200 acres, the arboretum offers sun-kissed meadows and butterflies dancing among bright blooms. Plants spill from beds and crowd the pathways. The dozen themed gardens include forest meadow, pollinator garden, riparian habitat and shade garden. Peak blooms are June-September.

Details: 4001 S. Woody Mountain Road, Flagstaff. $12, $6 for ages 5-17. 928-774-1442, www.thearb.org.

Camp at the Grand Canyon's North Rim

You can reserve sites at the North Rim Campground within Grand Canyon National Park but it’s quite often full. If so, try DeMotte, a small campground in Kaibab National Forest, 7 miles from the park boundary.

Sitting at the edge of vast meadows at 8,700 feet and fringed by mixed conifer forest, DeMotte Campground offers 38 single-family sites for tents and RVs (no hookups). It’s a great place for wildlife sightings. Half the sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis, and the other half can be reserved.

Details: From Jacob Lake, drive 25 miles south on State Route. $26 per night. 877-444-6777, https://www.recreation.gov .

Take a walk: 7 easy hikes at the Grand Canyon, plus 3 not-too-difficult ones that go below the rim

Splash in a cool mountain stream near Payson

Tonto Natural Bridge State Park, northwest of Payson, shelters the largest natural travertine bridge in the world. The Pine Creek Trail slips down through the woods to join the slender waterway that carved the mighty bridge. From there just work your way downstream, around boulders and past a series of pools.

The splashy music of cascades and mini-falls echoes through the trees. Look for small caves and alcoves along the bank. Arrows painted on rocks lead the way. The trail ends at the cavernous 400-foot-long tunnel beneath the bridge. Return the way you came or climb out via the short but steep Anna Mae Trail. Swimming is permitted downstream from the bridge.

Details: The park is 10 miles north of Payson off State Route 87. $7 per person, $4 for ages 7-13. 928-476-4202, https://azstateparks.com/tonto .

Cozy up in a waterfront cabin in Greer

Greer Lodge Resort & Cabins offers a sweet getaway for anglers, with all cabins on or near the water. Guests just have to choose whether they want a cabin on the small trout ponds or on the Little Colorado River.

But you don't have to fish to enjoy the property. Built in 1948, Greer Lodge borders national forest and includes a play area, basketball and volleyball courts and horseshoe pits. Watch for deer and elk grazing the meadows. They offer 20 well-appointed log cabins. The largest can sleep 12. Several are dog friendly.

Details: 80 Main St., Greer. Cabins start at $129 per night; check the website for specials. 928-735-2304, www.greerlodgeaz.com.

Ride a gondola to the top of the San Francisco Peaks

What a ski season it’s been at Arizona Snowbowl north of Flagstaff, going until May 29. Just a few weeks later, the scenic Arizona Gondola skyride began making its daily journeys up to the mountaintop.

Marvel at the vistas spilling away in all directions as you glide up the slopes before being deposited at 11,500 feet. Pause to enjoy incredible panoramas, the sweet chilled mountain air, and some memorable photo opportunities before returning. You may not be on the roof of Arizona but you’re pretty darned close.

Details: 9300 N. Snowbowl Road, Flagstaff. Gondola tickets start at $18 when you buy online in advance. https://www.snowbowl.ski .

Drive up the highest mountain in southern Arizona

Travel through five life zones on this twisting climb up the slopes of Mount Graham, southern Arizona’s highest peak. For 35 miles State Route 366 makes a switchbacking ascent from desert scrubland to high forests. The last 12 miles are a narrow winding gravel road. (You may be more comfortable in a high-clearance vehicle.)

You’ll climb past creeks, picnic areas and campgrounds. Ladybug Saddle is named for the large number of the colorful beetles that gather during summer. A wildflower-carpeted alpine meadow known as Hospital Flat (once used by recuperating soldiers from Camp Grant) makes a peaceful rest break.

The road ends near one of the prettiest high-country lakes you’ll find. Shimmering Riggs Flat Lake is ringed by pine and fir trees at 9,000 feet.

Details: From Safford, drive south on U.S. 191 for 8 miles and turn west on State Route 366. 928-428-4150, www.fs.usda.gov/coronado.  

A summer's worth of adventure awaits at Lyman Lake State Park

At 1,500 acres, Lyman Lake dwarfs all bodies of water in the White Mountains. With such an expanse, there are activities for everybody, including a sheltered swimming beach, a no-wake zone for anglers, twisting canyons kayakers will love and plenty of wide-open water for speed-boaters and skiers.

A small store sells food, bait and supplies. Anglers can catch largemouth bass, catfish, carp and walleye. The campground overlooks the lake, featuring 56 sites, 38 with electric and water hookups. The park also eight eight air-conditioned cabins with full-sized beds, bunk beds, table, chairs and covered porch.

Details: The park is 19 miles north of Springerville in eastern Arizona. It's about 235 miles from central Phoenix. Day use is $10 per vehicle. 928-337-4441, https://azstateparks.com/lyman-lake .

Visit Hawley Lake, the coldest place in Arizona

Surrounded by mountain peaks, Hawley Lake is tucked away on White Mountain Apache tribal Land. Hawley gained notoriety for having the coldest temperature ever recorded in Arizona, 40 degrees below 0 in January 1971.

The 300-acre lake is an angler's playground filled with rainbow, brook, brown and cutthroat trout. You need a permit to fish on tribal land. Go to https://wmatoutdoor.org for info. The lake offers camping, a lodge, cabins and boat rentals.

Details: Hawley Lake is on State Route 473 in the White Mountains southeast of McNary. It's about 205 miles from central Phoenix. 928-369-1753, www.wmat.nsn.us/hawleycabins.

Drive south for high-elevation hiking at Chiricahua National Monument

Instead of going north, dodge some traffic by driving south to Chiricahua National Monument. Forming an island of sculpted stone and forest in a sea of arid grasslands, the 12,000-acre park southeast of Willcox shelters an exotic array of massive columns, slender spires and impossibly balanced boulders.

The craggy skyline seems to be built from the splintered remains of ancient castles. Elevation at Chiricahua National Monument ranges from 5,124 feet at the entrance station to 7,310 feet at the top of Sugarloaf Mountain.

A shady campground is tucked amid the oaks and pines of Bonita Canyon. Miles of hiking trails weave their way through the otherworldly rock formations. And tours of Faraway Ranch, a homestead from the 1880s, are conducted when staffing permits.

Details: From Willcox, drive south on State Route 186 for 32 miles. Turn left on SR 181 and continue 4 miles to the park. Free. 520-824-3560, www.nps.gov/chir.

Meet Roger Naylor, get summer travel tips

Roger Naylor will be in metro Phoenix on July 25 to talk about his latest book, "Awesome Arizona: 200 Amazing Facts About the Grand Canyon State." There will be a slide presentation with travel tips, and Naylor will answer questions and sign copies of his book ($16.95). And there will be coffee and pastries.

Details: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 25. Georgia T. Lord Library, 1900 N. Civic Square, Goodyear. Free. https://mcldaz.org/en-US/georgia-t-lord .

Find the reporter at www.rogernaylor.com . Or follow him on Facebook at www.facebook.com/RogerNaylorinAZ or Twitter @AZRogerNaylor.

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COMMENTS

  1. Antelope Canyon Tours

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  2. Antelope Canyon

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    Welcome to Antelope Slot Canyon Tours. "The company that offers a personal Native American experience.". Antelope Slot Canyon Tours by Chief Tsosie is located in Page Arizona, right next to the great Lake Powell, and in the center of the Grand Circle. Navajo owned and operated by Rosalind Tsosie, you'll enjoy our personal tour of the ...

  4. Tours for Antelope Canyon

    Tours for Antelope Canyon. Antelope Canyon is one of the most recognized slot canyons in the American Southwest. It is located on Navajo land just east of Page, AZ. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, scenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as "Upper Antelope Canyon" or "The Crack"; and "Lower Antelope Canyon" or "The Corkscrew".

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    A Navajo-owned and operated family business offering public and private antelope canyon tours! Explore Northern Arizona's backcountry and slot canyons. Book now! Skip to primary navigation Skip to content Skip to footer. Book now to receive 20% off any future tour. Use promo code SUMMER20 until August 31st, 2024.

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    Tour Upper Antelope Canyon. Located just 3 miles east of Page, Arizona, Tsé Bíghanílíní provides premier private tours into the Upper Antelope Canyon. Come experience the beautiful corridors and passages of Upper Antelope Canyon with a Navajo guide that will explain the cultural knowledge of the Navajo people and the geology of the land.

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    Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours. Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours provides one-of-a-kind tours of beautiful Upper Antelope Canyon near Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon is made up of two magnificent slot canyons that lie on land belonging to the Navajo Nation, and is a sacred site of the Navajo People as well as a Navajo Tribal Park that can be accessed by permit only.

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    Come explore the slot canyons of our Deer Canyon tour. This upper antelope valley tour traverses down a 135 ft stairway into secluded slot canyons. Book Now! ... PAGE, AZ WEATHER. PAGE, AZ WEATHER. ANTELOPE VALLEY CANYON TOURS +1 928-640-2594 [email protected] Antelope Valley Canyon Tours- Ligai Si' Anii ...

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    Tour 1 allows sightseers to experience the canyon for around 80 minutes in their selected time slot. With the new updated guidelines, Upper Antelope Canyon is a single direction tour. Visitors will now exit with a 15-minute hike, up and over the beautiful canyon. There are 21 steps going up and 112 steps going down. What to Bring.

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    About Dineh Tours. We are a Navajo (Native American) owned and operated tour company specializing in Antelope Canyon Navajo hiking tours from Page, Arizona. We give half-day tours of Lower and Upper Antelope Canyons. During our Navajo tours we share stories of our culture as our elders have done for a thousand generations before us.

  14. Slot Canyon Tours

    Some of these other slot canyons are Cardiac Canyon, Secret Canyon, Rams Head, Ligai Si Anii and Wind Pebble Canyons. Most of these tours, if not all, are operated by Navajo tour companies and require paying an $8 Navajo Permit Fee in addition to the tour package price. Going on one of these slot canyon tours is a fantastic way to avoid the ...

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    Reservations must be made online. If you cannot find the answers to your questions in our detailed FAQ section, please don't hesitate to reach out to us by calling (928) 640-6808.. For those looking to enrich their Northern Arizona experience and are interested in combining another tour in Sedona, Monument Valley, or Page, our dedicated The Adventurous Group Concierge team is ready to assist ...

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    Mystical Antelope Canyon Tours and Arrowhead Campground. Both located on the Navajo Nation near the town of Page, Arizona. We give our guests the opportunity to experience the Dine (Navajo) way of life by offering them the option to pitch a tent, or stay in one of our tipis. Guests are also encouraged to join us on a tour of Mystical Antelope ...

  20. Page: Upper Antelope Canyon Entry Ticket and Guided Tour

    Pre-book your admission ticket to Upper Antelope Canyon and witness a masterpiece of nature's uncanny craftsmanship as you embark on a visual feast for your senses. Enjoy a scenic ride to the canyon before venturing on a guided walking tour with a Navajo local. Start your trip with a scenic ride to the canyon (approximately 10 minutes on a ...

  21. Page: Antelope Canyon X Guided Tour

    Discover Canyon X in Antelope Canyon on a guided tour, with timed entry for a hassle-free adventure. Admire the unique forms and vibrant colors of this relatively new canyon and learn about its history and formation from your experienced guide along the way. Enter through the southeast of Lower Antelope Canyon and embark on a live guided tour ...

  22. The Ultimate Guide To Page, Arizona Slot Canyon Tours To Help You

    This two hour tour is only run by Chief Tsosie's Tours and takes you to Cathedral Canyon, a hidden gem slot canyon near Page, Arizona. On this tour you get to see slot canyons, Cathedral Hall, The Four Sisters, Thumb Rock, and Pucket Rock while learning about plants, animals, and human life in the area.

  23. 48 Hours in Page, Arizona: Glen Canyon, Antelope Canyon & Horseshoe

    03/28 - Drive to Page, AZ (~2.5-3.5 hours), optional stop to hike Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos trail , afternoon tour of Antelope Canyon, overnight in Page, AZ 03/29 - Drive to Grand Canyon South Rim, visit Horseshoe Bend on the way out of town, stop at Cameron Trading Post for lunch/dinner, and Grand Canyon viewpoints between Desert ...

  24. Dixie's Lower Antelope Canyon Tours celebrates 10-year ...

    PAGE, AZ (AZFamily) — Millions of people from all over visit the swirling red rocks of Antelope Canyon every year. Several different tour companies are available. One of them, a Navajo woman ...

  25. VERDE CANYON RAILROAD

    34 reviews and 84 photos of VERDE CANYON RAILROAD "Highly recommend if you're in the area and have the time. The spectacular views, amazing hospitality, and just overall friendly atmosphere made this train trip one to remember. We got some great pictures, and learned some interesting new facts! Can't wait to come back in another season and see the changes.

  26. Hermit Road Scenic Overlooks

    Along the canyon rim are 9 designated viewpoints. These viewpoints are described on the page and all have shuttle bus stops. The Canyon Rim Trail also follows the rim of the canyon for 7.8 miles (12.6 km) alongside Hermit Road, and offers the opportunity for short or long walks between viewpoints — on both paved and dirt trails.

  27. Arizona Calendar of Events

    Sculpture Tucson Presents Installations by Two Accomplished Southwest Artists. 3420 E. River Rd Tucson, Arizona 85718

  28. Coolest summer getaways in Arizona: Grand Canyon, Flagstaff, 8 more

    The best places to beat the heat in Arizona include a scenic drive up a 9,000-foot mountain and a cave hike where the temp is 42 degrees. ... Camp at the Grand Canyon's North Rim ... And tours of ...