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June 22, 2023 - Missing Titanic sub crew killed after 'catastrophic implosion'

By Helen Regan , Adam Renton, Rob Picheta , Aditi Sangal , Elise Hammond , Matt Meyer , Tori B. Powell and Maureen Chowdhury , CNN

Our live coverage of the Titan submersible tragedy has moved here.

"Titanic" director worries implosion will have a negative impact on citizen explorers

Film director James Cameron said Thursday he's worried that the Titan submersible's implosion will have a negative impact on citizen explorers.

"These are serious people with serious curiosity willing to put serious money down to go to these interesting places," the "Titanic" director told CNN's Anderson Cooper. "I don't want to discourage that. But I think that it's almost now a lesson. The takeaway is, make sure if you're gonna go into a vehicle, whether it's an aircraft or surface craft or a submersible, that it's been through certifying agencies."

Some background: Stockton Rush, the CEO of OceanGate Expeditions, which operated the Titan submersible, and who died in the implosion, had spoken about his antipathy to regulations .

“At some point, safety just is pure waste,” Stockton  told journalist David Pogue  in an interview last year. “I mean, if you just want to be safe, don’t get out of bed. Don’t get in your car. Don’t do anything.”

"Titanic" director says news of submersible's implosion did not come as a surprise

From CNN's Sabrina Souza

James Cameron appears on CNN on Thursday, June 22. 

James Cameron, director of the hit 1997 film “Titanic,” says news of the Titan submersible's explosion "certainly wasn't a surprise."

Cameron, who has made 33 dives to the wreckage himself, told CNN's Anderson Cooper that when he first heard the news of the Titan incident Monday morning, he connected with his small community in the deep submergence group and found out within about a half-hour that the submersible had lost communication and tracking, simultaneously. 

“The only scenario that I could come up with in my mind that could account for that was an implosion,” he told Cooper on Thursday. “A shockwave event so powerful that it actually took out a secondary system that has its own pressure vessel and its own battery power supply which is the transponder that the ship uses to track where the sub is." 

Cameron said he did more digging and got some additional information that seemed to confirm that the submersible had imploded.

"I encouraged all of them to raise a glass in their honor on Monday,” Cameron said of his community group.

He said false-hopes kept getting dangled as search teams looked for the missing passengers over the following days.

"I watched over the ensuing days this whole sort of everybody-running-around-with-their-hair-on-fire search, knowing full well that it was futile, hoping against hope that I was wrong but knowing in my bones that I wasn’t,” Cameron told Cooper.

He expressed condolences for the families of the passengers.

Submersible heading to Titanic wreckage suffered "catastrophic implosion." Here's what we know

From CNN staff

An undated photo of the OceanGate Titan submersible.

The five passengers on the Titan submersible that was diving 13,000 feet to view the Titanic on the ocean floor died in a "catastrophic implosion," authorities said Thursday, bookending an extraordinary five-day international search operation near the site of the world's most famous shipwreck.

The tail cone and other debris were found by a remotely operated vehicle about 1,600 feet from the bow of the Titanic, deep in the North Atlantic and about 900 east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

“This is an incredibly unforgiving environment down there on the sea floor and the debris is consistent with a catastrophic implosion of the vessel,” US Coast Guard Rear Adm. John Mauger, the First Coast Guard District commander, told reporters.

Here's what we know:

  • Debris: The remotely operated vehicle found " five different major pieces of debris " from the Titan submersible, according to Paul Hankins, the US Navy's director of salvage operations and ocean engineering. The debris was "consistent with the catastrophic loss of the pressure chamber " and, in turn, a " catastrophic implosion ," he said. As of now, there does not appear to be a connection between the  banging noises picked up by sonar  earlier this week and where the debris was found.
  • Timing: The US Navy detected an acoustic signature consistent with an implosion on Sunday and relayed that information to the commanders leading the search effort, a senior official told CNN. But the sound was determined to be “not definitive,” the official said. Mauger, for his part, said rescuers had sonar buoys in the water for at least the last 72 hours and had "not detected any catastrophic events." Listening devices set up during the search also did not record any sign of an implosion, Mauger added.
  • What comes next: The remotely operated vehicles will remain on the scene  and continue to gather information, Mauger said. It will take time to determine a specific timeline of events in the "incredibly complex" case of the Titan's failure, Mauger said. The Coast Guard official said the agency will eventually have more information about what went wrong and its assessment of the emergency response.
  • Response: Mauger applauded the “huge international” and “interagency” search effort. He said teams had the appropriate gea r and worked as quickly as possible. The Coast Guard official also thanked experts and agencies for assisting with the search for the Titan submersible.

titanic tour explosion

  • Who was on board: Tour organizer OceanGate Expeditions said Hamish Harding, Shahzada Dawood and his son Suleman Dawood, Paul-Henri Nargeolet and  OceanGate CEO  Stockton Rush died in the submersible. They "shared a distinct spirit of adventure," the company in a statement .
  • Reaction: Nargeolet, a French diver, was an incredible person and highly respected in his field , said his friend Tom Dettweiler, a fellow ocean explorer. The president of The Explorers Club said the group is heartbroken over the tragic loss. Two passengers, businessman Harding and Nargeolet, were members, it said. Engro Corporation Limited, of which Shahzada Dawood was Vice Chairman, said the company grieves the loss of him and his son. The governments of Pakistan and the United Kingdom also offered condolences .

White House thanks Coast Guard and international partners for search efforts

From CNN's Jeremy Diamond

The White House thanked the US Coast Guard and international partners for their search and rescue efforts for the submersible that went missing on its way to the Titanic wreckage.

"This has been a testament to the skill and professionalism that the men and women who serve our nation continue to demonstrate every single day," a White House spokesperson said.

Earlier Thursday, the Coast Guard thanked experts and agencies from all over the world for assisting in the effort, calling it a “huge international” and “interagency” search.

The White House spokesperson also expressed sympathy for the families of the five passengers onboard the submersible.

“Our hearts go out to the families and loved ones of those who lost their lives on the Titan. They have been through a harrowing ordeal over the past few days, and we are keeping them in our thoughts and prayers," the spokesperson said.

Passengers lost in the "catastrophic implosion" of the Titan submersible remembered by loved ones

From CNN's Sugam Pokharel, Francesca Giuliani-Hoffman, Mostafa Salem in Abu Dhabi and Sofia Cox in Atlanta

From left, Hamish Harding, Shahzada Dawood, Suleman Dawood, Paul-Henri Nargeolet and Stockton Rush.

The Titan submersible bound for the Titanic that went missing on Sunday with five people on board suffered a “catastrophic implosion,” US Coast Guard Rear Adm. John Mauger said Thursday.

Now those who knew the passengers are grappling with their tragic loss and some have sent messages of condolences as their legacies are remembered.

Engro Corporation Limited, where Pakistani businessman Shahzada Dawood was vice chairman, issued a statement on the deaths of Dawood and his son Suleman — who were among the five people on board the Titan submersible .

“With heavy hearts and with great sadness, we grieve the loss of our Vice Chairman, Shahzada Dawood, and his beloved son, Suleman Dawood. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Dawood family at this tragic time. We extend our heartfelt condolences to the family, colleagues, friends, and all those around the world who grieve this unthinkable loss,” the company tweeted on Thursday.

Dubai-based Action Aviation, the company owned by passenger Hamish Harding released a statement on behalf of his family.

“Today, we are united in grief with the other families who have also lost their loved ones on the Titan submersible," the statement read. "Hamish Harding was a loving husband to his wife and a dedicated father to his two sons, whom he loved deeply. To his team in Action Aviation, he was a guide, an inspiration, a support, and a Living Legend."

The statement went on to praise the efforts made to search for the Titan sub.

"We know that Hamish would have been immensely proud to see how nations, experts, industry colleagues and friends came together for the search, and we extend our heartfelt thanks for all their efforts. On behalf of the Harding family and Action Aviation, we would like to politely request privacy at this incredibly difficult time," it said.

The family of French diver Paul-Henri Nargeolet said he will "be remembered as one of the greatest deep-sea explorers in modern history."

The statement signed by Nargeolet’s children and wife said that they hope people think about Paul-Henri and his work when they think about the Titanic, "but what we will remember him most for is his big heart, his incredible sense of humor and how much he loved his family. We will miss him today and every day for the rest of our lives."

His stepson, John Paschall, described him as an “incredible stepfather” and someone who was caring and had a great sense of humor. He recalled how his mother and Nargeolot drove across the country to attend his college graduation in 2014 after their flight got canceled.

“They hop into their small, blue Mini Cooper and they drive 16 hours across the country from Connecticut to Chicago, drive through the night. I am quite certain that he did a lot of the driving. They showed up with one hour to spare for graduation,” he told CNN. “They made it there. At that time, my mom was very sick of cancer and meant so much to me that she could be there for that moment. That is something I will never forget about him.”

US Navy detected implosion on Sunday and relayed information to search efforts, official says

From CNN's Oren Liebermann

The US Navy detected an acoustic signature consistent with an implosion on Sunday in the general area where the Titan submersible was diving in the North Atlantic when it lost communication with its support ship, according to a senior Navy official.

The Navy immediately relayed that information to the on-scene commanders leading the search effort, the official said Thursday, adding that information was used to narrow down the area of the search.

But the sound of the implosion was determined to be “not definitive,” the official said, and the multinational efforts to find the submersible continued as a search and rescue effort.

The Wall Street Journal was the first to report about the acoustic signature picked up by the Navy.

Audio of the implosion was picked up by a network of sensors as part of an underwater Navy acoustic listening system, said the official, who declined to go into more detail about the secret system. The network of sensors allowed the Navy to zero-in on a possible location of the noise, providing search teams with a more refined area. 

The Navy also helped analyze the audio signatures of banging and other acoustic data that were heard throughout the search efforts. Those were likely some form of natural life or sounds given off by other ships and vessels that were part of the search effort, the official said.

Expert describes how robots and other machinery will help recover Titan wreckage

A single vessel, if properly equipped, and remotely controlled vehicles on the seafloor would likely be capable of recovering the wreckage of the Titan submersible, Capt. Mark Martin, a salvage master and deep submergence pilot, said Thursday.

The ship would need a crane with a wire that can reach a depth of 4,000 meters (about 2 and a half miles), which can be found on many vessels involved in offshore gas and oil construction, Martin said in an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper.

Recovery crews will also need one or two remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs, which have already played a key role in the search for signs of Titan, the captain said. The ROVs are large, powerful machines that can be controlled from the vessel above them.

The ROVs will work in concert with the crane to scoop pieces of the sub into large "recovery baskets," which Martin said look like half of a shipping container made of mesh.

ROVs will pick up pieces with their arms and move them into baskets, or help attach pieces to straps for the crane, which will lift pieces to the surface, he said.

Director James Cameron says he sees similarities between Titanic wreck and submersible tragedy

From CNN’s Lisa France

The port bow railing of the Titanic is seen in an undated photo.

James Cameron, who directed the hit 1997 film "Titanic" and has made 33 dives to the wreckage, said he saw some similarities between the Titan traged y and the sinking of the famous ship it was bound for.

"I'm struck by the similarity of the Titanic disaster itself, where the captain was repeatedly warned about ice ahead of his ship and yet steamed at full speed into an ice field on a moonless night and many people died as a result," Cameron told  ABC News Thursday.

He added, "And with a very similar tragedy where warnings went unheeded to take place at the same exact site with all the diving that's going on all around the world I think it's just astonishing. It's really quite surreal."

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Titanic sub destroyed in 'catastrophic implosion,' all five aboard dead

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The Titan submersible operated by OceanGate Expeditions dives in an undated photograph

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What caused the ‘catastrophic implosion’ that killed 5 on Titanic tourist sub?

The submersible Titan is prepared for it's ill-fated dive to the Titanic in the North Atlantic on Sunday.

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The tragic news that five people died when a submersible imploded while on a dive to explore the Titanic wreck site is sparking questions and will be the focus of an investigation.

“I know that there’s also a lot of questions about how, why and when did this happen,” U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. John W. Mauger said. “Those are questions that we will collect as much information as we can on now.”

The sub was reported missing after it lost contact with the Canadian research vessel Polar Prince about 1 hour and 45 minutes into its dive Sunday about 900 miles east of Cape Cod, Mass., the Coast Guard said.

There had been earlier concerns about the safety of the vessel.

What do we know about the implosion?

Mauger said at a news conference Thursday that it is too early to tell at what point in its dive the vessel imploded, and added that listening equipment used throughout the search did not detect any type of catastrophic event.

El Segundo, CA - June 22: Bill Price, shown wearing a OceanGate Inc. shirt, a California man who went on dives in the Titan, the now-missing submersible that was exploring the Titanic wreckage. Photo taken in El Segundo Thursday, June 22, 2023. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

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Bill Price took a voyage with OceanGate to the ruins of the Titanic. He’s reckoning now with the loss of two men he deeply respected.

June 23, 2023

However, a U.S. government official who is familiar with the incident but not authorized to speak to the media and requested anonymity told The Times that technology designed to listen to the ocean for movement captured the sound of the submersible imploding around the time communications were lost. That news was first reported by the Wall Street Journal, which noted the sound “anomaly.”

The Journal reported that “the Navy began listening for the Titan almost as soon as the sub lost communications, according to a U.S. defense official. Shortly after the submersible’s disappearance Sunday , the U.S. system detected what it suspected was the sound of an implosion near the debris site discovered Thursday and reported its findings to the Coast Guard commander on site, U.S. defense officials said.”

Mauger said Thursday that “the debris is consistent with the catastrophic loss of the pressure chamber.”

A robot submersible from the Canadian vessel Horizon Arctic discovered several major pieces of the 21-foot sub, the Titan , in a debris field on the ocean floor about 1,600 feet from the bow of the Titanic.

What did officials find at the scene?

Paul Hankins, a salvage expert for the Navy, said five major pieces of debris from the Titan were found, including the nose cone, which was outside of the pressure hull. The robot sub also found a large debris field that included the front-end bell of the pressure hull.

“That was the first indication there was a catastrophic event,” he said. A second, smaller debris field contained the other end of the pressure hull and other wreckage that indicated a total compromise of the vessel.

AT SEA - (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY â" MANDATORY CREDIT - " OCEANGATE/ HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) An undated photo shows tourist submersible belongs to OceanGate begins to descent at a sea. Search and rescue operations continue by US Coast Guard in Boston after a tourist submarine bound for the Titanic's wreckage site went missing off the southeastern coast of Canada. (Photo by Ocean Gate / Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

World & Nation

5 aboard Titanic tourist sub are dead after ‘catastrophic implosion’

The five people aboard a submersible that vanished on a trip to explore the Titanic wreckage have died after a catastrophic implosion, the U.S. Coast Guard says.

June 22, 2023

Officials said the debris was in an area away from the Titanic wreckage in a patch of smooth ocean floor and that there were no signs the vessel collided with the historic ship. The size of the debris field and the vessel’s last known location are consistent with an “implosion in the water column,” officials said.

How did the search proceed?

Since the sub went missing on Sunday, crews using specialized equipment worked around the clock to find the sub, which was designed to have an initial air supply of 96 hours. Officials also said it had only “limited rations” of food and water.

The search grew to 10,000 square miles, roughly the size of Massachusetts, and went 2½ miles deep. Through the days-long effort, officials maintained optimism that they were conducting a search-and-rescue effort and not a recovery mission.

This photo provided by OceanGate Expeditions shows a submersible vessel named Titan used to visit the wreckage site of the Titanic. In a race against the clock on the high seas, an expanding international armada of ships and airplanes searched Tuesday, June 20, 2023, for the submersible that vanished in the North Atlantic while taking five people down to the wreck of the Titanic. (OceanGate Expeditions via AP)

‘Catastrophic’ safety concerns raised about sub long before ill-fated Titanic voyage

Long before a submersible vanished on an expedition to explore the wreck of the Titanic, concerns were raised about the safety of the vessel.

June 21, 2023

Assets launched in the search included American and Canadian aerial support vessels that scanned the ocean’s surface and subsurface using sonobuoys; U.S. Navy divers; coast guard and research vessels from Canada, France and Norway, some of which were equipped with highly specialized remote-operated vehicles that could work on the ocean’s floor; and assistance from commercial vessels.

Left: Director James Cameron of "Avatar" Right; An undated photo shows tourist submersible belongs to OceanGate

Entertainment & Arts

James Cameron says Titan submersible passengers likely had warning just before implosion

‘Titanic’ director James Cameron says that OceanGate’s Titan submersible deaths are ‘impossible to process’ and that passengers were likely warned just before implosion.

A moment of promise came Tuesday when the Coast Guard confirmed reports that banging noises were detected on the seafloor by sonobuoys dropped from Canadian aircraft. Although officials said the origins of the sounds were unclear, they became the target of search efforts.

At the news conference announcing the loss of the Titan on Thursday, Mauger said the underwater noises , which were also observed Wednesday, did not appear to be connected to the sub’s location. The implosion would generate “significant broadband sound” that would have been picked up by the sonobuoys, he said.

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titanic tour explosion

Alexandra E. Petri is a former Los Angeles Times staff writer who covered trends and breaking news. She previously covered live news at the New York Times. A two-time reporting fellow with the International Women’s Media Foundation, she graduated from Penn State with a degree in journalism and international studies.

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The Titan submersible imploded, killing all 5 on board, the US Coast Guard says

The race against time to find a submersible that disappeared on its way to the Titanic wreckage site entered a new phase of desperation as the final hours of oxygen left on board the tiny vessel ticked off the clock. (June 22)

titanic tour explosion

A renowned Titanic expert, a world-record holding adventurer, two members of one of Pakistan’s wealthiest families and the CEO of the company leading an expedition to the world’s most famous shipwreck are facing critical danger aboard a small submersible that went missing in the Atlantic Ocean. (June 21)

titanic tour explosion

A surveillance vessel has detected underwater noises in the area where rescuers are searching for a submersible that went missing in the North Atlantic while bringing five people down to the wreck of the Titanic, authorities said Wednesday. (June 21)

FILE - This undated image provided by OceanGate Expeditions in June 2021 shows the company's Titan submersible. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night. (OceanGate Expeditions via AP, File)

FILE - This undated image provided by OceanGate Expeditions in June 2021 shows the company’s Titan submersible. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night. (OceanGate Expeditions via AP, File)

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In this satellite image provided by Maxar Technologies, from top to bottom, the vessels Horizon Arctic, Deep Energy and Skandi Vinland search for the missing submersible Titan, Thursday, June 22, 2023 in the Atlantic Ocean. (Satellite image ©2023 Maxar Technologies via AP)

U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. John Mauger, commander of the First Coast Guard District, center at microphone, talks to the media Thursday, June 22, 2023, at Coast Guard Base Boston, in Boston. The U.S. Coast Guard says the missing submersible imploded near the wreckage of the Titanic, killing all five people on board. Coast Guard officials said during a news conference that they’ve notified the families of the crew of the Titan, which has been missing for several days. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. John Mauger, commander of the First Coast Guard District, talks to the media, Thursday, June 22, 2023, at Coast Guard Base Boston, in Boston. The missing submersible Titan imploded near the wreckage of the Titanic, killing all five people on board, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

This photo provided by OceanGate Expeditions shows a submersible vessel named Titan used to visit the wreckage site of the Titanic. In a race against the clock on the high seas, an expanding international armada of ships and airplanes searched Tuesday, June 20, 2023, for the submersible that vanished in the North Atlantic while taking five people down to the wreck of the Titanic. (OceanGate Expeditions via AP)

FILE - OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush emerges from the hatch atop the OceanGate submarine Cyclops 1 in the San Juan Islands, Wash., on Sept. 12, 2018. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night, June 18, 2023. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times via AP, File)

FILE - Submersible pilot Randy Holt, right, communicates with the support boat as he and Stockton Rush, left, CEO and Co-Founder of OceanGate, dive in the company’s submersible, “Antipodes,” about three miles off the coast of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., June 28, 2013. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night, June 18, 2023. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

FILE - In this image released by Action Aviation, the submersible Titan is prepared for a dive into a remote area of the Atlantic Ocean on an expedition to the Titanic on Sunday, June 18, 2023. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night. (Action Aviation via AP, File)

U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. John Mauger, commander of the First Coast Guard District, right, listens as Paul Hankins, U.S. Navy civilian contractor, supervisor of salvage, left, talks to the media, Thursday, June 22, 2023, at Coast Guard Base Boston, in Boston. The U.S. Coast Guard says the missing submersible imploded near the wreckage of the Titanic, killing all five people on board. Coast Guard officials said during the news conference that they’ve notified the families of the crew of the Titan, which has been missing for several days. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

FILE - The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Warren Deyampert is docked as a member of the Coast Guard walks past, Tuesday, June 20, 2023, at Coast Guard Base Boston, in Boston. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night, June 18, 2023. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

FILE - The logo for an OceanGate Expeditions 2019 Titanic expedition is seen on a marine industrial warehouse office door in Everett, Wash., Tuesday, June 20, 2023. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night. (AP Photo/Ed Komenda, File)

CORRECTS SPELLING OF THE NAME TO HENRI, INSTEAD OF HENRY This photo combo shows from left, Shahzada Dawood, Suleman Dawood, Paul-Henri Nargeolet, Stockton Rush, and Hamish Harding are facing critical danger aboard a small submersible that went missing in the Atlantic Ocean. The missing submersible Titan imploded near the wreckage of the Titanic, killing all five people on board, the U.S. Coast Guard announced Thursday, June 22, 2023. (AP Photo/File)

U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Jamie Frederick, right, faces reporters as Royal Navy Lt Cdr Rich Kantharia, left, looks on during a news conference, Wednesday, June 21, 2023, at Coast Guard Base Boston, in Boston. The U.S. Coast Guard says sounds and banging noises have been heard from the search area for Titanic submersible. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Jamie Frederick, left, faces reporters as Carl Hartsfield, director and senior program manager Oceanographic Systems Laboratory, center, and Paul Hankins, U.S. Navy civilian contractor, supervisor of salvage, right, look on during a news conference, Wednesday, June 21, 2023, at Coast Guard Base Boston, in Boston. The U.S. Coast Guard says sounds and banging noises have been heard from the search area for Titanic submersible. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

In this satellite image provided by Maxar Technologies, from top to bottom, the vessels L’Atalante, Horizon Arctic, Deep Energy, and Skandi Vinland search for the missing submersible Titan, Thursday June 22, 2023 in the Atlantic Ocean. (Satellite image ©2023 Maxar Technologies via AP)

U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Jamie Frederick, center at microphone, faces reporters during a news conference, Wednesday, June 21, 2023, at Coast Guard Base Boston, in Boston. The U.S. Coast Guard says sounds and banging noises have been heard from the search area for Titanic submersible. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

FILE - This 2004 photo provided by the Institute for Exploration, Center for Archaeological Oceanography/University of Rhode Island/NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, shows the remains of a coat and boots in the mud on the sea bed near the Titanic’s stern. Rescuers are racing against time to find the missing submersible carrying five people, who were reported overdue Sunday night, June 18, 2023. (Institute for Exploration, Center for Archaeological Oceanography/University of Rhode Island/NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, File)

A submersible carrying five people to the Titanic imploded near the site of the shipwreck and killed everyone on board, authorities said Thursday, bringing a tragic end to a saga that included an urgent around-the-clock search and a worldwide vigil for the missing vessel.

The sliver of hope that remained for finding the five men alive was wiped away early Thursday, when the submersible’s 96-hour supply of oxygen was expected to run out following its Sunday launch and the Coast Guard announced that debris had been found roughly 1,600 feet (488 meters) from the Titanic in North Atlantic waters.

“This was a catastrophic implosion of the vessel,” said Rear Adm. John Mauger, of the First Coast Guard District.

After the craft was reported missing, the U.S. Navy went back and analyzed its acoustic data and found an anomaly that was “consistent with an implosion or explosion in the general vicinity of where the Titan submersible was operating when communications were lost,” a senior Navy official told The Associated Press on Thursday.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive acoustic detection system.

In this photo video released by Indonesia's Geological Agency of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (Badan Geology), the night sky glows as Mount Ibu spews volcanic materials during an eruption on Halmahera Island, Indonesia, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (Badan Geologi via AP)

The Navy passed on that information to the Coast Guard, which continued its search because the Navy did not consider the data to be definitive.

OceanGate Expeditions, the company that owned and operated the submersible, said in a statement that all five people in the vessel, including CEO and pilot Stockton Rush, “have sadly been lost.”

The others on board were two members of a prominent Pakistani family, Shahzada Dawood and his son Suleman Dawood; British adventurer Hamish Harding; and Titanic expert Paul-Henri Nargeolet.

“These men were true explorers who shared a distinct spirit of adventure, and a deep passion for exploring and protecting the world’s oceans,” OceanGate said in a statement. “We grieve the loss of life and joy they brought to everyone they knew.”

OceanGate has been chronicling the Titanic’s decay and the underwater ecosystem around it via yearly voyages since 2021. The company has not responded to additional questions about the Titan’s voyage this week.

The company’s office was “closed indefinitely while the staff copes with the tragic loss of their team member,” according to a statement Thursday by the Port of Everett, which is about 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of downtown Seattle and is home to OceanGate.

The Coast Guard will continue searching for more signs about what happened to the Titan.

While the Navy likely detected the implosion Sunday through its acoustics system, underwater sounds heard Tuesday and Wednesday — which initially gave hope for a possible rescue — were probably unrelated to the submersible. The Navy’s possible clue was not known publicly until Thursday, when The Wall Street Journal first reported it.

With a search area covering thousands of miles — twice the size of Connecticut and in waters 2 1/2 miles (4 kilometers) deep — rescuers all week rushed ships, planes and other equipment to the site of the disappearance.

Broadcasters around the world started newscasts at the critical hour Thursday with news of the submersible. The Saudi-owned satellite channel Al Arabiya showed a clock on air counting down to their estimate of when the air could potentially run out.

The White House thanked the U.S. Coast Guard, along with Canadian, British and French partners who helped in the search and rescue efforts.

“Our hearts go out to the families and loved ones of those who lost their lives on the Titan. They have been through a harrowing ordeal over the past few days, and we are keeping them in our thoughts and prayers,” it said in a statement.

The Titan launched at 6 a.m. Sunday and was reported overdue that afternoon about 435 miles (700 kilometers) south of St. John’s, Newfoundland. By Thursday, when the oxygen supply was expected to run out, there was little hope of finding the crew alive.

In 2021 and 2022, at least 46 people successfully traveled on OceanGate’s submersible to the Titanic site, according to letters the company filed with a U.S. District Court in Norfolk, Virginia, that oversees matters involving the shipwreck. But questions about the submersible’s safety were raised by former passengers .

One of the company’s first customers likened a dive he made to the site two years ago to a suicide mission.

“Imagine a metal tube a few meters long with a sheet of metal for a floor. You can’t stand. You can’t kneel. Everyone is sitting close to or on top of each other,” said Arthur Loibl, a retired businessman and adventurer from Germany. “You can’t be claustrophobic.”

During the 2 1/2-hour descent and ascent, the lights were turned off to conserve energy, he said, with the only illumination coming from a fluorescent glow stick.

The dive was repeatedly delayed to fix a problem with the battery and the balancing weights. In total, the voyage took 10 1/2 hours.

Nicolai Roterman, a deep-sea ecologist and lecturer in marine biology at the University of Portsmouth, England, said the disappearance of the Titan highlights the dangers and unknowns of deep-sea tourism.

“Even the most reliable technology can fail, and therefore accidents will happen,” Roterman said. “With the growth in deep-sea tourism, we must expect more incidents like this.”

Associated Press writers Jon Gambrell in Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Ben Finley in Norfolk, Virginia; Frank Jordans in Berlin; Danica Kirka in London; and John Leicester in Paris contributed to this report.

PATRICK WHITTLE

What we know about the 'catastrophic implosion' that killed five men aboard the Titanic submersible

OceanGate Titan submersible floating at the surface of the ocean

After several days of searching in a remote area of the North Atlantic, the five people aboard a submersible near the Titanic wreck have been declared dead.

The cause of their deaths was a "catastrophic implosion of the vessel", according to US Coast Guard Rear Admiral John Mauger.

Here's what an implosion means, how it happens and whether the passengers could have felt it. 

How was the Titan sub found?

An uncrewed deep-sea robot deployed from a Canadian ship discovered the wreckage of the Titan submersible on Thursday morning.

Soon after the debris of the vessel was found, OceanGate Expeditions, the US-based company that operated the submersible, released a statement confirming the deaths of the five passengers. 

"We now believe that our CEO Stockton Rush, Shahzada Dawood and his son Suleman Dawood, Hamish Harding, and Paul-Henri Nargeolet, have sadly been lost," the company said. 

What did it find?

Five major fragments of the Titan were located in the debris field left from its disintegration.

This included the vessel's tail cone and two sections of the pressure hull , Coast Guard officials said.

"The debris field here is consistent with a catastrophic implosion of the vehicle," Mauger said.

No mention was made of whether human remains were sighted.

Where was it found?

Wreckage of the Titan submersible was found 488 metres from the bow of the Titanic wreckage.

This was 4 kilometres below the surface.

A photo of the Atlantic Ocean on a cloudy day taken from a plane

The US Coast Guard believes the nature and location of the debris suggests a catastrophic implosion which would have killed all five people on board.

When did the sub implode?

The US Coast Guard said it was too soon to say when the implosion happened.

The Titan had been missing since June 18. 

He said it was not detected by sonar buoys used by search crews, which suggests it happened before they arrived.

One source says the implosion may have happened days ago.

A US Navy acoustic system detected an "anomaly" on Monday, a senior military official told The Associated Press. 

It found the anomaly to be "consistent with an implosion or explosion in the general vicinity of where the Titan submersible was operating when communications were lost". 

The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive acoustic detection system.

The navy passed on the information to the coast guard, which continued its search because the navy did not consider the data to be definitive.

The navy's possible clue was not known publicly until Friday, when The Wall Street Journal first reported it.

What is an implosion?

Implosion is an explosion in reverse , according to Professor Stefano Brizzolara, the co-director of Virginia Tech Center for Marine Autonomy and Robotics. 

"Imagine a cylinder: during an explosion, the charge placed in the centre ignites and causes the pressure at the centre to increase instantaneously," Professor Brizzolara told ABC News. 

Such intense pressure is what causes the  ejection of mass to move from the centre of the cylinder to the outside  at an "incredible speed".

"An implosion is the reverse of this," Professor Brizzolara said.

A submersible floating in the ocean

"The inside of the cylinder can practically be considered void, while the pressure of the wave that breaches the hull is 400 times larger.

"This causes a violent flow of water from outside of the cylinder to the inside, with incredible speed.

"We're talking water rushing in at a speed of the order of 1,000 kilometres per hour."

What made it 'catastrophic'?

"Catastrophic implosion" literally means breaking into pieces and small fragments , says Professor Brizzolara.

Here's where "the hull" comes in — it's the main body of a ship or vessel and the Titan's is made from  carbon fibre and titanium.

Carbon-reinforced plastic collapses "catastrophically", says Professor Brizzolara.

"This is because the material is not ductile like metal alloys and therefore it 'catastrophically' implodes."

For context, navy submarines use high-strength steel or titanium alloys, Professor Brizzolara says. 

"This is why current rules and regulations do not consider composite materials for underwater vehicles meant to operate at large depths," he said. 

How did the implosion happen? 

A flood or a failure of the pressure vessel would have likely caused the implosion, says submarine expert Eric Fusil from the University of Adelaide.

That kind of "catastrophic event" would have happened within 20 milliseconds , Professor Fusil told ABC News Breakfast this morning. 

The Titan's pressure hull was made of a combination of titanium and a composite material of carbon fibres, which he described as "very new".

"The titanium pressure vessel is very elastic — it can crush and then restore its initial shape," Professor Fusil explained.

"But the carbon fibres are completely different — it's something very stiff."

"We have those two opposite forces," he said. 

Graphic showing the dimensions of the Titan submersible.

Professor Fusil said it's an "experimental technology" and it was too early to tell whether that design caused the issues. 

What does an implosion feel like?

The five passengers inside the Titan submersible might not have realised it was even happening , Professor Fusil says.

"They wouldn't have realised they were dying because they cannot process that information that quickly," he said.

Implosions can be similar to a balloon, says forensic engineer Bart Kemper. 

"When I take a needle and poke it into a balloon, once you break that balloon, it's gone," Mr Kemper told 7.30’s Sarah Ferguson.

"That's exactly the problem you have with a pressure vessel, and the fact that this is external pressure, not internal pressure, it doesn't matter.

"Once you lose integrity, with these kinds of pressures, it's gone," he said. 

In 2018, submarine experts had warned the company operating the Titan, OceanGate, that without industry oversight the submersible was exposing passengers to possible catastrophic failure.

One of those experts was Mr Kemper.

What about those 'banging noises'?

Underwater sounds described as "banging noises" by a Canadian surveillance vessel initially sparked hope for a possible rescue. 

But these underwater sounds heard on Tuesday and Wednesday were probably unrelated to the submersible, The Associated Press reports.

The sounds in the Titan search were picked up using devices called sonobuoys , which can be tossed out of aeroplanes to detect noises, to avoid interference with ship sounds, said Matt Dzieciuch, an ocean acoustics expert at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

The ocean is a "noisy place," Dr Dzieciuch said.

Person scuba diving on ocean floor

There are many other potential sources of sound underwater, including from fish, other animals and of course human-made instruments, he explained.

Search teams heard the banging noises at 30-minute intervals , US Coast Guard Captain Jamie Frederick said at a press conference. 

But Mr Frederick went on to say analysis of the noises had been "inconclusive".

"With respect to the noises specifically, we don't know what they are, to be frank with you."

OceanGate has been chronicling the Titanic's decay and the underwater ecosystem around it via yearly voyages since 2021.

The company has not responded to additional questions about the Titan's voyage this week.

The Coast Guard will continue searching for more signs about what happened to the Titan.

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'True explorers': The 5 passengers who died on the missing Titanic submersible

titanic tour explosion

Five men, including one teenager, have been declared dead days after they left for a voyage in a 22-foot submersible to see the wreckage of the Titanic in the North Atlantic Ocean. 

OceanGate, the company that hosted the mission on the Titan submersible to the Titanic, said Thursday that the entire crew – including its founder and CEO who was the pilot in the mission – were “lost at sea.” The U.S. Coast Guard also announced Thursday that rescue teams had found debris from the ship on the ocean floor “consistent with catastrophic loss of the pressure chamber.” 

The passengers were well known for their devotion to extreme exploration, desire to collect artifacts from the Titanic or their exorbitant wealth. Each paid $250,000 to ride on the submersible. The Coast Guard said families of the men had been notified of their deaths.

"These men were true explorers who shared a distinct spirit of adventure, and a deep passion for exploring and protecting the world’s oceans. Our hearts are with these five souls and every member of their families during this tragic time," OceanGate said in a statement Thursday.

Rear Admiral John Mauger of the U.S. Coast Guard said during a press conference Thursday he did not know whether the Coast Guard would be able to recover the bodies. 

"This is an incredibly unforgiving environment down there on the seafloor," he said.

For live updates on this disaster, read USA TODAY’s live blog here . The passengers on the sub were:

OceanGate's CEO Stockton Rush

Stockton Rush, 61,  founded  OceanGate in 2009. He was also the co-founder of  OceanGate Foundation , a non-profit organization "which aims to catalyze emerging marine technology to further discoveries in marine science, history, and archaeology," according to the company's website.

Rush said at a conference in Seattle last year: “One of the reasons I started the business was because I didn’t understand why we were spending 1,000 times as much money to explore space as we were to explore … the oceans. There is no private access to the deep ocean, and yet there’s all this life to be discovered.”

At the same conference, he also said submarine safety programs were “over the top in their rules and regulations.”

Before graduating from Princeton University with a degree in aerospace engineering in 1984 and obtaining a master’s degree in business administration from the University of California in 1989, Rush had obtained his captain’s rating at the United Airlines Jet Training Institute. He went on to oversee business ventures that included serving on the board of Seattle’s BlueView Technologies and as chairman of Remote Control Technology.

Greg Stone, the former executive vice president and chief scientist for Conservation International as well as a friend of Rush, said there was a need for advances in research submersibles.

“That’s the direction he was going in. And I liked where he was going,” Stone said.

But, he added, Rush “had the problem that a lot of frontier people have. And that is he was ahead of the regulations.”

Rush had familial ties to the Titanic, NPR reported . Stockton Rush was married to Wendy Rush, the great-great granddaughter of Isador and Ida Straus, who were on board the sinking Titanic ship together.

British billionaire explorer Hamish Harding

Hamish Harding, 58, was chairman of Action Aviation, a global sales company in business aviation. He held three Guinness World Records related to his explorations by plane and into the deep ocean. He had also been to space.

He had been looking forward to his Titan ride. “Due to the worst winter in Newfoundland in 40 years, this mission is likely to be the first and only manned mission to the Titanic in 2023," Harding wrote in a  Facebook post  Saturday, the day before the Titan voyage, according to the New York Times. "A weather window has just opened up and we are going to attempt a dive tomorrow. We started steaming from St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada yesterday and are planning to start dive operations around 4am tomorrow morning. Until then we have a lot of preparations and briefings to do."

Richard Garriott de Cayoux, president of The Explorers Club, mourned the loss of his friends Harding and Paul-Henry Nargeolet on Twitter in a letter Thursday to “fellow explorers.”

“They were both drawn to explore, like so many of us, and did so in the name of meaningful science for the betterment of mankind,” he wrote. “Their memories will be a blessing and will continue to inspire us in the name of exploration.”

French maritime and Titanic expert Paul-Henri Nargeolet

Paul Henri-Nargeolet, 73, was director of Underwater Research for E/M Group and RMS Titanic, Inc. He successfully dived in a submersible to the site of the Titanic wreckage 37 times and "supervised the recovery of 5,000 artifacts," according to EMGroup's  website , which also says he's "widely considered the leading authority on the wreck site."

"Born in Chamonix, France, P.H. lived in Africa for 13 years with his family and at 16 returned to France to complete his studies in Paris. He later joined the French Navy for a career that spanned 22 years and saw him rise in the ranks to Commander," according to the company site.

“I really hope they will find them all safe,” his daughter Sidonie Nargeolet said prior to Thursday’s announcement.

Dive expert David Mearns called Harding “a terrific character," and said Nargeolet was “almost a legend really in the field of deep sea exploration,” BBC reported.

Shahzada Dawood

Shahzada Dawood, 48, was one of the richest men in Pakistan and served as vice chairman of Pakistani Engro Corporation , a Pakistani conglomerate founded as a fertilizer company, where he worked for 20 years. He was on the board of trustees for the Dawood Foundation, an education nonprofit, and on the board of the SETI Institute, a non-profit research organization.

Dawood had over two decades of experience “in corporate governance” and “ the transformation of industries, including growth and innovation opportunities through mergers and acquisitions of diversified public-listed companies across textiles, fertilizers, foods, and energy,” his profile on the World Economic Forum site reads.

"He aspires to a sustainable future and believes in inclusive business models involving low-income communities building value chains along business interests," the profile states .

He is survived by his wife, Christine Dawood, and his daughter, Alia Dawood.

Suleman Dawood

Suleman Dawood, 19, loved science fiction, solving Rubik’s Cubes and playing volleyball, the New York Times  reported . He was studying at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, according to the BBC. 

Shahzada Dawood's older sister told  NBC News  she was "absolutely heartbroken" over the deaths.

"I feel like I’ve been caught in a really bad film, with a countdown, but you didn’t know what you’re counting down to," Azmeh Dawood said. "I personally have found it kind of difficult to breathe thinking of them."

She also said her nephew Suleman told one of their relatives that he was “terrified” about the voyage. She told NBC News Suleman went on the trip with his dad because he wanted to make his dad happy and it fell on the Father's Day weekend.

“I am thinking of Suleman, who is 19, in there, just perhaps gasping for breath… It’s been crippling, to be honest,” she told the news outlet. 

In a letter to the “friends, followers and community of the SETI Institute” Thursday, CEO Bill Diamond shared the news of the deaths of Dawood and his son.

“Shahzada was passionately curious and an enthusiastic supporter of the SETI Institute and our mission, being directly involved in philanthropic programs in education, research and public outreach,” said Diamond. “He will be deeply missed by all who knew him, especially his fellow Trustees and the leadership of the SETI Institute.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Missing Titanic submarine: Timeline of how the deep-sea tragedy unfolded

Five crew members are presumed to be dead after the titan submarine suffered a ‘catastrophic explosion’ - this is how it all unfolded, article bookmarked.

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On Saturday night, billionaire explorer Hamish Harding took to Instagram to reveal he was among the crew of a submersible vessel on their way to explore the Titanic wreckage .

“I am proud to finally announce that I joined  OceanGate Expeditions  for their RMS TITANIC Mission as a mission specialist on the sub going down to the Titanic,” Mr Harding wrote.

“Due to the worst winter in Newfoundland in 40 years, this mission is likely to be the first and only manned mission to the Titanic in 2023. A weather window has just opened up and we are going to attempt a dive tomorrow.”

Mr Harding said the five-member crew, which included French diver Paul-Henri Nargeolet, Pakistani businessman Shahzada Dawood and his son Suleman Dawood, had set sail from St Johns, Newfoundland, Canada, on Friday.

They were planning to start their 4,000m descent to the most famous shipwreck in the world at 4am on Sunday morning. “Until then we have a lot of preparations and briefings to do,” he said.

Titanic sub latest – Investigations begin into ‘Russian roulette’ mission as recovery operations wind down

About 105 minutes into the trip, the Tital submersible stopped communicating with its mothership.

But just five days later, it would be confirmed that the submarine suffered a “catastrophic implosion” and all five people on board were confirmed to have died.

Hamish Harding posted about his plans to travel to see the Titanic wreckage two days before the sub went missing

Here’s a timeline of the horror ordeal:

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Capt. Hamish Harding (@actionaviationchairman)

Sunday (18 June)

The Polar Prince icebreaker sailed around 900 miles off the coast of Newfoundland, where it set anchor.

The five-person crew was dropped into the ocean in their 22-foot long submersible vessel, the Titan, around 8am EST the submersible was launched, according to the US Coast Guard

One hour and 45 minutes later, the vessel lost contact with the Polar Prince.

The vessel was programmed to send out a “ping” every 15 minutes to indicate its location. The final signal was sent at around 10am ET, according to The Times .

The Titan typically takes around two hours to reach the Titanic wreckage, located about 4,000m beneath the ocean.

The OceanGate Expeditions submersible vessel named Titan used to visit the wreckage site of the Titanic

According to the Coast Guard, the sub was meant to surface at 3pm EST.

When it failed to resurface, the crew raised the alarm with authorities at 5.40pm EST.

At a press conference in Boston, Captain Jamie Frederick, of the US Coast Guard, said: “On Sunday, the co-ordination command centre in Boston received a report from the Canadian expedition vessel Polar Prince of an overdue 21 foot submarine, Titan, with five people on board.

“The Titan was attempting to dive on the wreck of the Titanic, approximately 900 miles east of Cape Cod and 400 miles south of St John’s, Newfoundland.

“Approximately one hour and 45 minutes into the scheduled dive, the Polar Prince lost all communication with the Titan, Polar Prince conducted an initial search and then requested Coast Guard assistance. The US Coast Guard in Boston assumed the responsibility of search-and-rescue mission coordinator and immediately launched search assets.

“Since Sunday, the Coast Guard has coordinated search efforts with the US and Canadian Coast Guard, Air National Guard aircraft and the Polar Prince (the Titan’s mother ship), which has searched a combined 7,600 square miles, an area larger than the state of Connecticut.”

The vessel was carrying enough oxygen for the crew for 96 hours — making the rescue mission a race against time to reach the vessel.

The divers failed to return from a 4,000m deep dive to the Titanic wreckage (Atlantic Productions, PA)

Monday (19 June)

On Monday morning, authorities revealed the Titan was missing and a large-scale search operation had been launched.

The US Coast Guard revealed they had begun a sweeping search of a 5,000sqm area about 900 miles off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The Canadian Coast Guard said it too is taking part in the effort with fixed-wing aircraft and a ship.

At 1.30pm, the US Coastguard’s Northeast tweeted that a C-130 Hercules reconnaissance aircraft had been dispatched to search for the Titan .

P8 Poseidon aircraft with underwater sonar capabilities joined the search on Monday afternoon.

A US Navy Curv-21, an unmanned submersible vessel that can reach a depth of 20,000 feet, is being used in the search for the missing Titanic wreck vessel

“It is a remote area and it is a challenge to conduct a search in that remote area but we are deploying all available assets to make sure we can locate the craft and rescue the people onboard,” US Coast Guard Rear Admiral John Mauger  told reporters  during a briefing at 4.30pm EST on Monday.

Submersible craft including an unmanned US Navy Curv-21, which can reach a depth of 4,000m, also joined the search.

The Polar Prince and 106 Rescue Wing continued to conduct surface searches throughout Monday evening.

Tuesday (20 June)

On Tuesday afternoon, OceanGate confirmed that its chief executive and founder Stockton Rush is “aboard the submersible as a member of the crew”.

A Canadian Aircraft P3 Aurora joined the effort, as the search area expanded to 10,000sqm.

During the press conference on Tuesday, Captain Frederick said there were around 40 to 41 hours of oxygen left on the submersible.

He said that a “unified command” of multiple agencies had been formed to tackle the “very complex problem” of finding the vessel but so far this had “not yielded any results”.

Captain Frederick said: “Since Sunday, the Coast Guard has coordinated search efforts with the US and Canadian Coast Guard, Air National Guard aircraft and the Polar Prince (the Titan’s mother ship), which has searched a combined 7,600 square miles, an area larger than the state of Connecticut.

“These search efforts have focused on both surface, with C-130 aircraft searching by sight and with radar, and subsurface, with P-3 aircraft we’re able to drop and monitor sonar buoys.

Captain Jamie Frederick told reporters that the “complex” search had “not yet yielded any results”

“To date, those search efforts have not yielded any results.”

Captain Frederick was non-committal however when asked if there is any way to retrieve the submersible and save the five on board if it can be located.

“So, right now all of our efforts are focused on finding the sub,” he said.

“What I will tell you is we have a group of our nation’s best experts in the unified command and if we get to that point, those experts will be looking at what the next course of action is.”

It is understood the King was being kept informed of the search efforts, as Shahzada Dawood was a long-time supporter of The Prince’s Trust International and The British Asian Trust, both of which are charities founded by Charles

It was also reported that a Canadian aircraft had detected “banging” noises within the search area over the course of 30-minute intervals.

Wednesday (21 June)

According to internal e-mail updates sent to Department of Homeland Security leadership, the Canadian aircraft detected “banging” noises every 30 minutes.

“RCC Halifax launched a P8, Poseidon, which has underwater detection capabilities from the air,” the e-mails read.

“Banging” noises have been detected leading to renewed hope of finding the five passengers aboard the submersible

“The P8 deployed sonobuoys, which reported a contact in a position close to the distress position. The P8 heard banging sounds in the area every 30 minutes. Four hours later additional sonar was deployed and banging was still heard.”

The US Coast Guard on Wednesday morning said: “Canadian P-3 aircraft detected underwater noises in the search area. As a result, ROV (remote operating vehicles) operations were relocated in an attempt to explore the origin of the noises.

“Those ROV searches have yielded negative results but continue.

“Additionally, the data from the P-3 aircraft has been shared with our U.S. Navy experts for further analysis which will be considered in future search plans.”

In an upbeat statement, President Richard Garriot de Cayeux of The Explorers’ Club said: “There is cause for hope, that based on data from the field, we understand that likely signs of life have been detected at the site.

“They precisely understand the experienced personnel and tech we can help deploy… We believe they are doing everything possible with all the resources they have.”

Mr Garriot de Cayeux said they were ready to provide the UK-based Magellan’s remotely operated vehicle (ROV) that is certified to travel as deep as 6,000 metres.

In a press conference on Wednesday (21 June) afternoon, Captain Jamie Frederick of the US Coast Guard assured people that authorities were doing everything possible to locate the missing vessel as the search intensified with more technology.

Mr Frederick confirmed that the vessel had less than 24 hours of oxygen supply left . He also acknowledged that officials do not know if crews will be able to rescue the people on board even if they do manage to find the sub before the oxygen runs out.

The first photo emerged of the Deep Energy rescue ship, which carries two remote-operated vehicles (ROVs) capable of operating to a depth of 3,000m, arriving at the search site on Wednesday. The John Cabot, which has “side-scanning sonar capabilities”, the Skandi Vinland and the Atlantic Merlin also arrived at the search site on Wednesday morning, the US Coast Guard said in a Twitter post .

The Royal Canadian Navy also deployed HMCS Glace Bay, which carries a medical team specialising in dive medicine. Onboard the ship is a six-person mobile hyperbaric recompression chamber that can be used to treat or prevent decompression sickness.

However, the French ship Atalante carrying the Victor 6,000 underwater (ROV) and winch — the only one capable of reaching the Titanic wreck 4,000m under the ocean surface — had a narrow window of time to conduct rescue operations as it only reached the search site on Wednesday night.

Thursday (22 June)

The air supply on the missing Titanic tourist submarine came down to its last hours, as rescue workers continued their increasingly desperate search for the five stranded passengers .

A US Coast Guard spokesperson told The Independent they expect the vessel , named Titan , would run out of oxygen at 8am EDT, which is 1pm UK time, on Thursday. This estimated time is based on the number of hours of oxygen the craft had for the five people on board - 96 - and the time it submerged - 8am EDT, which is 1pm UK time, on Sunday.

Soon after that deadline passed, officials announced a “debris field” had been found in the search area.

Five crew members were later confirmed to have died after the Titanic tourist submarine suffered a “catastrophic explosion”.

The US Coast Guard offered its “deepest condolences” to the families after the tail cone of the vessel was found around 1,600ft from the bow of the Titanic wreck.

In a press conference, Rear Admiral John Mauger said further debris was “consistent with a catastrophic loss of the pressure chamber”.

In a statement, OceanGate Expeditions said: “These men were true explorers who shared a distinct spirit of adventure, and a deep passion for exploring and protecting the world’s oceans.

“Our hearts are with these five souls and every member of their families during this tragic time.

“We grieve the loss of life and joy they brought to everyone they knew.”

Asked what the prospects of recovering crew members were, Rear Admiral Mauger said: “This is an incredibly unforgiving environment down there on the sea floor and the debris is consistent with a catastrophic implosion of the vessel.

“And so we’ll continue to work and continue to search the area down there, but I don’t have an answer for prospects at this time.”

Rear Admiral Mauger also said there did not appear to be any connection between the underwater noises detected during the search and rescue mission and the location of the debris on the seafloor.

“This was a catastrophic implosion of the vessel which would have generated a significant broadband sound down there that the sonar buoys would have picked up,” he said.

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Highlights from Day One as the search for the missing Titanic submersible continues

Coverage on this live blog has ended. Please click here for the latest updates. 

The CEO of OceanGate Expeditions, Stockton Rush, was on board and piloting the missing submersible that vanished during a mission to explore the wreckage of the Titanic , the company said Tuesday.

There is less than 40 hours of oxygen supply left on the missing vessel, named Titan, which is carrying five people, a U.S. Coast Guard official said Tuesday as the search continues.

The submersible is part of an OceanGate Expeditions tour that offers passengers a once-in-a-lifetime experience to explore the Titanic wreckage. It went missing Sunday after it lost contact with the research vessel Polar Prince.

What to know about the missing vessel, Titan

  • The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for the missing research submersible, named Titan, that disappeared Sunday.
  • The wreckage of the Titanic, the iconic ocean liner that sank more than a century ago, is 900 nautical miles east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • The sub had up to 96 hours of oxygen supply and by 1 p.m. ET Tuesday was down to 41 hours, the U.S. Coast Guard said.
  • Canadian aircraft detected “underwater noises” in the search area, the U.S. Coast Guard said early Wednesday. It said searches “yielded negative results but continue.”
  • The price of a spot on the submersible was $250,000. It was on only its third trip since OceanGate Expeditions began offering trips in 2021.

British billionaire Hamish Harding, owner of Action Aviation, was also among the five people on the vessel , along with French dive expert Paul Henry Nargeolet and prominent Pakistani businessman Shahzada Dawood and his son, Suleman.

Aircraft detect 'underwater noises' in the search for missing submersible

titanic tour explosion

Phil Helsel

Valeriya Antonshchuk

Canadian aircraft searching for signs of the submersible detected “underwater noises” in the search area, the U.S. Coast Guard said early Wednesday.

The underwater noises, detected by Canadian P-3 aircraft, prompted searches by remotely operated vehicles, the Coast Guard tweeted shortly before 12:30 a.m. ET.

"Those ROV searches have yielded negative results but continue," the message read. "Additionally, the data from the P-3 aircraft has been shared with our U.S. Navy experts for further analysis which will be considered in future search plans."

A representative said OceanGate was unable to provide any additional information at this time.

Coast Guard image shows search patterns for Titan

The U.S. Coast Guard released an image showing the search patterns for Titan.

Search patterns used in the search for 21-foot submersible Titan after it went missing 900 miles east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, June 20, 2023.

It said that 10,000 square miles had been searched as of Tuesday and that the searches are ongoing.

Canadian coast guard, navy and private research and commercial vessels with remotely operated vehicles have responded or were en route to help Tuesday, officials said. The U.S. and Canada also have planes searching.

Coast Guard establishes unified command in search for Titan

The U.S. Coast Guard said Tuesday night that it and other agencies and searchers are operating under a unified command as the search for the Titan continues.

More than 10,000 square miles had been searched by Tuesday morning, the Coast Guard said, and weather and visibility have improved.

Three Canadian coast guard ships, as well as a commercial vessel and a French research vessel with remote-operated vehicles, and a Canadian navy ship with a mobile decompression chamber were on the way, the Coast Guard said.

The Bahamian research vessel Deep Energy and a U.S. Air National Guard C-130 are also searching, the Coast Guard said.

Friend of man on submersible says he and Hamish Harding's family are hopeful

titanic tour explosion

Tom Costello

Titan submersible passenger Hamish Harding was excited for the voyage down to the ocean’s depths to see the wreckage of the Titanic, friend and business partner Terry Virts said Tuesday.

“He was excited. The text I got was ‘hey, we’re headed down to Titanic today, exclamation point,” Virts, a former NASA astronaut and Air Force F-16 pilot, told NBC News. Harding sent the text early Sunday.

Harding, the owner of Action Aviation, is one of five people aboard the missing Titan submersible, which is the focus of a search in the North Atlantic. He was not worried about the risks but was aware of them, Virts said.

Virts said he and Harding’s family are hopeful.

"The really good news that we have is that we haven’t heard bad news — they haven’t found a wreckage, they haven’t found debris floating, the sonar didn’t pick up any kind of crushing or exploding noise," he said. "So there’s definitely hope that the crew is alive in the submersible."

Search for missing submersible is a ‘monumental task,’ expert says

One of the best-case scenarios that might have happened to the Titan would be if it has been entangled in the wreckage of the Titanic, an ocean explorer and expert said Tuesday.

If that's the case, it could make the submersible with five people aboard easier to find, Tim Taylor, an ocean explorer and the CEO of Tiburon Subsea, said on NBC News Now.

“Lifting the submarine off the bottom is not as hard or difficult as one may think if it’s still intact,” Taylor said.

It’s unclear what happened to the submersible, and searches are ongoing.

“You’re really fighting a clock here,” Taylor said. “They don’t have a lot of options. Every hour that goes by, their options get less and less.”

Getting assets to the area takes time, he said, and when equipment arrives, searchers will have to decide where to look with the time they have.

“This is a monumental task,” he said.

Canada sending ship specializing in dive medicine

A Canadian plane with sonar flew above the area around the Titan, and Canada is sending rescue ships and a vessel equipped with a mobile hyperbaric recompression chamber, officials said.

The Royal Canadian Air Force CP-140 Aurora has been providing sonar searches, the U.S. Coast Guard said.

The Royal Canadian Navy ship HMCS Glace Bay has also been dispatched, Canada’s military said.

“HMCS Glace Bay provides a medical team specializing in dive medicine and a six person mobile hyperbaric recompression chamber,” it said in a statement.

A hyperbaric recompression chamber is used to treat or prevent decompression sickness. When divers are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure, nitrogen forms bubbles in tissue and blood.

Two other Canadian coast guard ships were either there or on the way.

U.S. Navy and Air Force sending support to search efforts

Doha Madani

The U.S. Coast Guard is getting help in its search efforts from two other branches of the military.

A spokesperson for the Navy said it was deploying its Flyaway Deep Ocean Salvage System to assist the Coast Guard. The equipment is specifically designed for the "recovery of large, bulky, and heavy undersea objects," and it has deep ocean lifting capacity.

The Air Force will also provide aid by transporting "rescue-related" cargo from Buffalo, New York, to St. Johns, Newfoundland, it said.

King Charles asks to be updated on Titan passengers

Andrew Jones

titanic tour explosion

David K. Li

King Charles III "has been asked to be kept up to date, and his thoughts and prayers are with the families and all those involved in the rescue operation," a royal source told NBC News.

Two of those on the submersible, Shahzada Dawood, 48, and his 19-year-old son , Suleman, are British citizens.

OceanGate CEO was piloting the sub when it disappeared

Stockton Rush, OceanGate's chief executive, was piloting the submersible, the company confirmed Tuesday.

A spokesperson previously said Rush was on board as a member of the crew.

Pilot said in lawsuit he was fired for warning Titan wasn't safe for deep dives

titanic tour explosion

Corky Siemaszko

The pilot OceanGate hired to run manned tests of submersibles claimed five years ago in court papers that he was fired after he warned that the Titan’s carbon shell was not properly tested to make sure it could descend safely to 4,000 meters.

David Lochridge also claimed OceanGate refused to pay extra for a viewport that could be used safely at a depth of 4,000 meters.

When he complained that OceanGate would be endangering customers, Lochridge said in the court papers, he was given “10 minutes to immediately clear out his desk.”

Lochridge’s claims, which were first reported by The New Republic , were in his counterclaim to a 2018 breach of contract lawsuit OceanGate filed saying he was not an engineer. The two sides settled a few months later.

Titan's depth capabilities were downgraded short of the Titanic

titanic tour explosion

The hull of the Titan vessel "showed signs of cyclic fatigue," according to a January 2020 interview with OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush, who is aboard the missing vessel. Rush told GeekWire that due to that stress, the hull rating was downgraded to a depth of 3,000 meters, 800 meters short of the Titanic's depth.

In a December 2019 slideshow that appears to have been presented to the Deep Submergence Science Committee of the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System, OceanGate listed the depth capability of the Titan as 3,000 meters.

At the time, the CEO was announcing a new round of funding for the company, which he said would go toward funding new vessels that could go deeper than the Titan.

But in 2021, OceanGate announced that Titan, not another vessel, had completed a trip to the Titanic.

There had been no public update about Titan's depth rating since it was downgraded.

On the company’s current webpage , it says the ship is designed for a 4,000-meter depth, despite previous statements made about the vessel's capabilities.

Titan's tiny space includes some bathroom privacy

Despite the Titan's close quarters, passengers do have access to semiprivate bathroom privileges.

"But because our sub is carbon fiber and we have so much space, we actually have a bathroom that is bigger than most private jets’ (bathrooms)," OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush told German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle in 2019 .

"You can put up a little curtain and you have some privacy. Most of our clients and I think even the researchers say that’s a huge thing, because nobody really looks forward to the idea of sitting next to two strangers, shoulder to shoulder, while you go to the bathroom."

Rescue operation faces extreme environment in search for missing sub

titanic tour explosion

Denise Chow

Rescuers trying to find a submersible that disappeared on a dive to the wreckage of the Titanic are not only racing the clock as the sub’s oxygen supplies dwindle — they are also battling a harsh and unforgiving environment more akin to outer space than most places on Earth.

“It’s pitch black down there. It’s freezing cold. The seabed is mud, and it’s undulating. You can’t see your hand in front of your face,” historian and Titanic expert Tim Maltin said in an interview with NBC News Now . “It’s really a bit like being an astronaut going into space.”

The deep-diving 22-foot submersible, operated by OceanGate Expeditions, vanished Sunday with five passengers on board, setting off a frantic rescue mission over a stretch of the North Atlantic Ocean roughly 400 miles off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada.

But unlike space, humanity’s presence deep in the world’s oceans is minimal, and the technology for search-and-recovery missions is limited.

Read the full story here.

OceanGate CEO called Titan's 2018 christening 'one of the great moments of submersibles'

When it was launched five years ago, the submersible Titan was hailed as a technological wonder of its time.

"This will be one of the great moments of submersibles in that this technology is what we need to explore the ocean depth," OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said at Titan's 2018 christening in Everett, Washington .

Rush insisted that day that private industry would be the great driving force of ocean exploration with little help from government agencies.

"The days of government funding are gone," he said. "It really needs to be a private enterprise, just as exploration was at the turn of the last century where people with means make the exploration possible."

Promotional documents illustrate tight quarters

Promotional documents for the Titan craft found on OceanGate’s website reveal the tight quarters that the five passengers are currently in.

In a diagram of the manned ship, which is 22 feet by 9.2 feet by 8.3 feet according to the documents, only one of the passengers is able to fully extend their legs. The diagram calls the arrangement the "Typical seating configuration."

Titan submarine

In a photograph published on a separate document, a similar configuration was depicted, with a caption saying, "Mission Specialists onboard Titan."

Mission Specialists onboard Titan.

Visibility conditions have improved today for aerial search

Marlene Lenthang

Visibility conditions have significantly improved today for aircraft scouring the surface of the Atlantic Ocean for signs of the missing OceanGate submersible, the Coast Guard said.

“Visibility was very foggy yesterday with very little to no visibility, but was increasing today and they were expecting much better conditions from an aerial search perspective,” Chief Petty Officer Robert Simpson, with the 1st Coast Guard District Public Affairs Office, said Tuesday.

He said the weather at the scene today included 5- to 6-foot waves and 15-knot winds.

In addition to assets from the Coast Guard, Navy and Canadian partners already deployed, civilian research vessels are also volunteering to aid in the search.

OceanGate's CEO is aboard missing submersible

Stockton Rush, the CEO of OceanGate Expeditions, is aboard the missing submersible, the company confirmed Tuesday afternoon.

He is on board as a member of the crew, the company said.

So far search has yielded 'no results'

The extensive search for the missing tourist submersible near the Titanic wreck has yielded "no results," Capt. Jamie Frederick with the 1st Coast Guard District said in a briefing Tuesday.

He said so far the search has been on the surface and under the water using sonar buoys over an area the size of the state of Connecticut. 

The search is ongoing with additional assets on the way to rescue the five people on board the Titan. There’s 41 hours of oxygen supply left on the vessel, "about 40 hours of breathable air," Frederick said.

France sends ship and robot to aid search for missing submersible

France is sending a ship called the Atalante to aid in the search for the missing OceanGate submersible, the French maritime ministry said Tuesday.

The ship was sent out in response to a request from American authorities Monday evening, the ministry said.

The ship, managed by the Ifremer research institute, was on a mission in the area, about a 48-hour drive from the Titanic wreckage. It'll arrive at the search site by 8 p.m. local time Wednesday.

A team from Ifremer will also arrive in Newfoundland on Wednesday morning to operate an exploration robot aboard the ship called Victor6000 that can dive to a depth of 4,000 meters.

Titan got ‘lost’ underwater last summer, CBS correspondent says

David Pogue, a CBS News correspondent, said that last year the submersible got “lost on the sea floor for a few hours,” when he was on an OceanGate expedition to visit the Titanic’s resting place.

“On my expedition last summer, they did indeed get lost for about 5 hours,” Pogue tweeted Monday. A segment on the trip aired in November . 

Pogue wasn’t in the submersible, but was in a control room on a ship at the surface at the time.

He noted the submersible never lost communication with its mother ship. He said the Titan didn’t have a beacon similar to an aircraft’s emergency locator transmitter, but “such a beacon was discussed.” 

“They could still send short texts to the sub, but did not know where it was. It was quiet and very tense, and they shut off the ship’s internet to prevent us from tweeting,” he said Monday. The company claimed it was to keep all channels open in case of a serious emergency, Pogue said.

Why the Titan wasn't safety classed

The missing submersible Titan wasn’t classed by an independent group that sets safety standards, as most chartered vessels are. 

OceanGate said in a blog post in February 2019 that Titan wasn’t classed because its technology was so new and their innovation “falls outside of the existing industry paradigm.”

It said there’d be a “multi-year approval cycle due to a lack of pre-existing standards.”

Classing usually checks if vessels meet standards in buoyancy, number of life rafts and hull materials, the blog post said. OceanGate said that while classing has a safety value, it is “not sufficient to ensure safety.”

'No signal is very bad news,' expert says

titanic tour explosion

Mithil Aggarwal

As a sweeping effort to locate the missing submersible continued, Pengfei Liu, professor of marine hydrodynamics at Britain's Newcastle University, told NBC News that the apparent lack of signal from the vessel is “very worrying.”

Ideally, a submersible should send a signal out every few minutes, he said, but it was not known if OceanGate had detected any recent signals after research vessel Polar Prince lost contact with the sub Sunday. OceanGate did not immediately respond to a request for comment from NBC News.

“No signal is very bad news,” the marine hydrodynamics professor said. An equipment failure due to an existing defect, depleted power or external damage could cause a signal outage, he said.

“If the submersible’s hull collapses under the enormous pressure, then survival chances are zero,” he said, adding that locating it in the first place would also be complicated had the vessel gotten stuck at the wreckage, since sonar systems would need to differentiate between the two.

Missing father and son Suleman and Shahzada Dawood pictured

titanic tour explosion

Chantal Da Silva

Shahzada Dawood and son Suleman can be seen in the photo below.

The father, a prominent Pakistani businessman, and his son were identified as being onboard the vessel by family and colleagues.

Titanic capsule missing crew members

The father and son, both British citizens, belong to one of Pakistan’s most prominent families, according to The Associated Press.

Their firm invests in agriculture, industries and the health sector, while Shahzada Dawood is also on the board of trustees for the California-based SETI Institute, which searches for extraterrestrial intelligence, according to the news agency.

Submersible was operated with a video game controller

Titan, the missing tourist submersible, was operated by a video game controller and had parts that were described as “off-the-shelf components.”

During a tour of the vessel in a CBS News segment that aired in November, OceanGate Expeditions CEO Stockton Rush pointed out some of these unexpected features, including a light fixture from CamperWorld and a makeshift toilet with a plastic bottle.

He brought out a Logitech game controller, saying that “we run the whole thing with this.” It was not immediately clear whether the submersible was operated with such a controller during the latest mission.

Game controllers can have a wide range of uses, including by pilots controlling drones, as well as in medical training.

OceanGate’s website describes the five-person submersible as a combination of “ground-breaking engineering and off-the-shelf technology,” the latter of which “helped to streamline the construction, and makes it simple to operate and replace parts in the field.” 

Thoughts of crew and their families driving search efforts

In the desperate search for the missing vessel touring the shipwreck of the Titanic deep in the Atlantic, crews are thinking of the lives of the five people on board first and foremost. 

“The thoughts of the crew members and their families really drive our crews forward and all of the partners that have been working this complex case to make sure we can continue to find them,” Coast Guard Rear Admiral John Mauger said Tuesday morning on NBC's "TODAY" show.

Factors such as oxygen levels, intense water pressure, and the remoteness of the area make the search difficult. 

The ship went down Sunday with four days worth of oxygen. The wreckage of the Titanic is also at a depth of 13,000 feet — too deep for typical U.S. Navy subs, which typically go down to 2,000 or 3,000 feet, to descend to. 

Canadian aircraft dropped a sonar buoy into the ocean listening for tapping or talking in an effort to pinpoint the submersible.  

OceanGate Expeditions leading underwater search

OceanGate Expeditions is leading the underwater search for the missing Titanic tourist submersible because the deep-water exploration company “know[s] that site better than anybody else,” Rear Adm. John Mauger with the Coast Guard said on NBC's “TODAY” show Tuesday morning. 

As the search for the 21-foot submersible entered the third day, Mauger said search crews have an “understanding” of where the submersible was operating and searches are being prioritized in those areas. 

The wreckage of the Titanic sits 900 nautical miles east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Searches are underway with equipment the Coast Guard has brought to the area. The agency's current focus is on getting more assets and technical experts to the scene as fast as possible.

What did the Titanic expedition set out to achieve?

The submersible that disappeared Sunday was on only its third trip since OceanGate Expeditions began offering them in 2021. 

On its website , the company said the expeditions are intended to "further document the Titanic and its rate of decay."

"Given the massive scale of the wreck and the debris field, multiple missions performed over several years will be required to fully document and model the wreck site," it says. "This longitudinal survey to collect images, videos, laser, and sonar data will allow objective assessment of the rate of decay and documentation of the process."

"Qualified explorers have the opportunity to join the expedition as Mission Specialist crewmembers whose Training and Mission Support Fees underwrite the mission, the participation of the science team, and their own training," the company states.

'You just rely on the thing being well made,' past survivor says

titanic tour explosion

For Roger Mallinson, one of two people rescued in the deepest underwater rescue ever, according to Guinness World Records, the search for the missing Titanic tour sub has evoked difficult memories.

Almost 50 years ago, while working on laying a transatlantic telephone cable, Mallinson's submersible hurled toward the sea floor after the rope connecting it with the mothership snapped. Mallinson’s crew of two was trapped for over 80 hours on Aug. 29, 1973, at more than 1,500 feet below sea level as rescuers scrambled to locate his sub around 150 miles off Cork, Ireland.

“You just rely on the thing being well made,” he told NBC News. As hours passed and temperatures dropped, the crew struggled to keep the carbon dioxide levels low, relying on the extra oxygen tank that Mallinson said he had snuck in before the dive.

Locating a submersible is the first challenge he said, which could be done by sonar, but he added it could be difficult to locate if the sonar is obstructed. Bringing the crew back up is another challenge. “What complicates a rescue mission is, whether they lift it from the surface or they do it from the bottom by adding buoyancy to the submersible."

Regardless, the crew inside has little options at their disposal, he said. They could be transmitting via the sea telephone but if they haven't already, "something very drastic must have happened by now," he said.

Behind the U.S. Coast Guard's search

titanic tour explosion

Phil McCausland

U.S. Coast Guard officials said they have "brought all assets that we have available" to the search to find the missing sub.

Speaking at a news conference on Monday afternoon, Rear Adm. John Mauger, who is leading the search, said the Coast Guard had brought in technical experts, dropped sonar buoys to listen for underwater noise and reached out to other government agencies and private contractors for aid and “to really better understand what an undersea search and rescue effort would look like."

In addition, Coast Guard officials said they had deployed two C-130 aircraft for an aerial search and that the sonar buoys can listen to a depth of 13,000 feet. The New York National Guard is providing a third C-130, and the Canadian Coast Guard provided a C-130, as well as a P8 Poseidon aircraft that has underwater detection capabilities.

The U.S. Coast Guard said it is also relying on commercial boat operators that were already in the nearby waters, as well as OceanGate’s mother ship, Polar Prince, for help.

Mauger added at the news conference that the Coast Guard is working to expand its capabilities to include an underwater search, as well.

Sub had up to 96 hours of oxygen supply, Coast Guard says

The search to find the missing submersible has become a race against time, with Coast Guard officials saying the sub had a 96-hour oxygen "reserve capacity."

“We really brought all assets that we have available to us to bear on finding the submersible and the people in it,” Rear Adm. John Mauger said at a news conference on Monday. “When something happens on the high seas, it gets complicated quickly," he added.

On a website page for the missing vessel, Titan, OceanGate Expeditions also describes the sub as having a “life support” of 96 hours for five crew members.

Asked how much of the 96 hours were left, Mauger said on Monday that officials anticipated there were somewhere between 70 to the full 96 hours available.

Map: Where is the Titanic located?

titanic tour explosion

Max Butterworth

The Titanic wreck is located around 370 miles off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada in the North Atlantic Ocean. It sits on the ocean floor in two main sections at a depth of about 12,500 feet.

titanic tour explosion

The luxury liner sank in 1912 on its maiden voyage to New York from Southampton, England after it hit an iceberg, taking the lives of over 1,500 passengers. 

Since it’s discovery in 1985, the wreck has been the site of numerous expeditions, including a recent full-size digital scan , revealing the remains in never before seen detail. 

The RMS Titanic Expedition Mission 5 submersible in the early hours of Sunday morning.

The US Coast Guard said late Monday, June 19, that its search for a missing submersible vessel near the Titanic wreck had been completed for the day, but that a national guard unit and the company operating the five-passenger underwater mission would continue scouring the surface overnight.

‘This could be the end’: NY writer describes trip on missing sub

Mike Reiss, a New York-based writer and producer who has worked on The Simpsons, says he was among the explorers to take a trip on the Titan sub last year.

"Yes, the sub that’s gone missing is the same one I took down to the Titanic. I wish everyone involved the best of luck," Reiss said in a Twitter post .

Speaking with BBC Breakfast in the U.K., Reiss said: “You sign a massive waiver that lists one way after another that you could die on the trip. They mention death three times on page one so it’s never far from your mind.”

“As I was getting onto the sub my thought was this could be the end," he said. “So nobody who’s in this situation was caught off guard. You all know what you are getting into."

What is a submersible?

The vessel that has gone missing is a submersible — not to be confused with a submarine.

Unlike a submarine, which is a fully autonomous craft "capable of renewing its own power and breathing air," a submersible relies on outside support, such as a surface vessel, a team onshore or sometimes even a larger submarine, according to OceanGate Expeditions, the company behind the Titanic tour dive.

Image:

The vessel that went missing is named Titan, according to The Associated Press . NBC News was not immediately able to confirm this. On its website, OceanGate describes its Titan vessel as a "revolutionary carbon fiber and titanium submersible with a depth range of 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) that provides access to almost 50% of the world’s oceans."

"Titan ushers in a new era of crewed submersible exploration and is the only sub in the world that can take five crewmembers to these depths," it says.

Titanic tour firm offered up-close experience for $250,000

David Ingram

Modern in-person tourism at the Titanic is still in its infancy. The  submersible that disappeared Sunday  near the Titanic wreckage was on only its third trip since the company OceanGate Expeditions began offering them in 2021. 

OceanGate had been promoting the third dive for months on its website and in Facebook posts, offering the chance to “follow in Jacques Cousteau’s footsteps and become an underwater explorer” — for the price of $250,000. 

“ Become one of the few to see the Titanic  with your own eyes,” the tour company said on its website. The ticket comes with a title: “mission specialist.” 

Participants have included a chef, an actor, a videographer and someone who worked in banking, the company said on Facebook. One of the customers said on Instagram last year that it was a once-in-a-lifetime experience that lived up to her expectations. 

First full-size scan showed Titanic wreck as never seen before

Henry Austin

Few people will ever get the opportunity to survey the wreckage of the Titanic up close — a bid that was at the heart of Sunday's mission when the Titan vessel went missing.

The first first full-size digital scan of the  Titanic  recently revealed the world’s most famous shipwreck as never seen before, however, and experts are hopeful it will provide more insight into how the liner came to sink in 1912. 

What we know about missing billionaire Hamish Harding

Hamish Harding, a billionaire and the owner and chairman of Action Aviation, is among the five people onboard the missing vessel.

Action Aviation, established in 2004, is described on its website as a global sales company in business aviation.

A post Sunday on Harding’s Instagram account said he was joining OceanGate’s expedition “as a mission specialist” — typically a one-time crew member who pays a fee to join the effort.

titanic tour explosion

"Due to the worst winter in Newfoundland in 40 years, this mission is likely to be the first and only manned mission to the Titanic in 2023," Harding said in his post. He said that a "weather window" had just opened up and that the team was going to attempt a dive the following day.

"Until then we have a lot of preparations and briefings to do," he said.

Pakistani businessman and son were onboard sub, family says

A prominent Pakistani businessman, Shahzada Dawood and his son, Suleman, were among the five people onboard the vessel when it went missing, family and colleagues said.

“We are very grateful for the concern being shown by our colleagues and friends and would like to request everyone to pray for their safety,” the family said in a statement provided by Engro, a company where Dawood serves as vice chairman of the board.

"We, at Engro, remain in prayer for their swift and safe return, and will share any updates we may have as and when they come," the company said.

Hamish Harding , the billionaire owner and chairman of Action Aviation, was previously identified as one of the missing crew members. The other two people who were onboard the vessel have yet to be identified.

Search continues for missing Titanic tour submersible

The U.S. Coast Guard continues its search on Tuesday for the missing submersible that disappeared Sunday after it departed for a mission to explore the wreck of the Titanic.

The 21-foot submersible and its five-person crew started a dive Sunday morning from the Canadian research vessel Polar Prince, the Coast Guard said. But the Polar Prince lost contact with the vessel after an hour and 45 minutes and it remains missing.

The missing submersible  —  named Titan,  according to The Associated Press   —  is part of a tour offered by private company OceanGate Expeditions exploring the Titanic wreckage, 900 nautical miles east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Billionaire explains why he's planning voyage to Titanic site nearly year after submersible implosion

Entrepreneur Larry Connor said he wants to show certified submersibles are safe.

Nearly a year after five people died aboard the OceanGate "Titan" submersible while on a deep-sea voyage to the site of the Titanic, a billionaire has announced plans to go to the infamous wreck.

Entrepreneur and real estate investor Larry Connor said this week that he and Triton Submarines CEO Patrick Lahey are planning their own deep-sea expedition in a submersible.

PHOTO: Larry Connor speaks with "Good Morning America."

Asked why, Connor told "Good Morning America" correspondent Will Reeve that the purpose of the voyage is to "demonstrate safety" of certified submersibles.

"If you look at submersibles that have been DNV certified ... there's never been an accident," he said. "The OceanGate vessel was not certified and never would have been."

While on a tour of the Titanic wreckage off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada, in June 2023, the OceanGate submersible imploded underwater, killing all five people on board, including OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush. Following a dayslong search, the remnants of the missing submersible were found on the ocean floor about 1,600 feet from the bow of the wrecked Titanic.

Experts called the carbon fiber construction of the Titan fundamentally flawed and a whistleblower who worked on a predecessor to the Titan vessel raised concerns about the inefficiency of the hull design. Rush had previously defended the decision to manufacture the submersible with carbon fiber, saying he believed it would have a better strength-to-buoyancy ratio than titanium. The exact cause of the implosion remains under investigation by federal authorities.

PHOTO: An OceanGate submarine is seen underwater in an undated photo.

MORE: James Cameron compares submersible tragedy to Titanic sinking: 'I'm struck by the similarity of the Titanic disaster'

OceanGate, which suspended all exploration and commercial operations after the deadly implosion, could not be reached for comment.

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Connor said he and Lahey are designing a new, safer and certified submersible, known as the Explorer, that could take two people to the Titanic site. The submersible will cost $13 million to $15 million and have an acrylic hull and offer a near-panoramic view.

Connor said he is "very confident" about the plan and would not do a dive if he was not "100% convinced" that the submersible was safe.

"The moment we don't meet one standard, the project is done," he said. "We will not compromise safety."

PHOTO: RMS The bow of the Titanic is seen in the Atlantic Ocean, north of Newfoundland in 1996.

In addition to proving safety, he said continued deep-sea dives carry scientific benefits.

"Almost three-quarters of the earth is covered in water. Isn't doing research important and worthwhile, given that fact?" he said.

MORE: Why Titanic continues to captivate more than 100 years after its sinking

Hakeem Oluseyi, a physicist and ABC News contributor, said he doesn't think deep-sea submersibles "should be abandoned for a single accident."

"If you think about the early days of space travel, we lost an entire crew," he said. "But that tells us what we've done wrong in the past and how to get it right in the future."

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Another manned submersible trip to the Titanic is being planned. A year after the fatal implosion, just how safe are today’s vessels?

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It would be the first deep-sea mission to the Titanic wreckage since the OceanGate submersible tragedy on June 18, 2023.

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OceanGate submersible underwater.

Nearly a year after a submersible carrying five passengers imploded en route to the wreckage of the Titanic, another manned deep dive in the North Atlantic is reportedly in the works. 

The billionaire-funded trip would take two men — Larry Connor, a real estate investor, and Patrick Lahey , co-founder of Triton Submarines — down some 12,500 feet in the summer of 2026 on a vessel that Triton is designing, according to the New York Times . 

It would be the first manned mission to the wreckage since the OceanGate submersible tragedy on June 18, 2023, an incident that shook the industry and garnered international attention. 

The pair say the acrylic-hubbed vessel would be the first of its kind to achieve such depths, and that they hope the trip would demonstrate that deep sea expeditions can be safely carried out. 

But just how safe are today’s vessels, and who signs off on them? Northeastern Global News asked Hanumant Singh , a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Northeastern, who has overseen the design of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), to shed some light on the kind of tech needed to sustain a vessel at such depths. 

Singh has personally traveled down to similar depths on the DSV Alvin, a deep-sea research vessel that he says is “the most successful submersible” ever built. 

Singh’s comments have been edited for brevity and clarity.

Headshot of Hanumant Singh.

Given the risks involved, why are people interested in these deep-sea missions?

There is something to be said about putting a person down in so that they can have his first-person view. Having said that, you can pretty much do anything you want with robotic vehicles. They can go just as deep, and they’re way safer. 

Take the analog of space. The James Webb Telescope can give you so much information about the outer world. Meanwhile, we’re actually going up into space, whether it’s Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin vehicles, or other space shuttles — even though a lot of that work can be done remotely. 

But there are reasons to put people up because, frankly, it’s a better story to tell. There’s a lot of fun in actually going out and doing it yourself.

How are these vessels certified, and who certifies them?

It’s another interesting question to ask. How do you certify a manned submersible? We build so few of them. It’s like, how do you certify a space shuttle? You’ve got all of NASA [National Aeronautics and Space Administration] working on that problem — and it’s a big deal. 

But, when it comes to underwater vessels, the NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] doesn’t do this. There’s no one agency that certifies such vehicles. In fact, when you talk about certification for submersibles, usually it’s something called the American Bureau of Shipping. They’re used to certifying ships, but not manned submersibles. 

The other option might be the Navy. But simply, we haven’t built enough manned submersibles to know what’s right and what’s wrong, especially when we look at new materials. When you look at titanium, that’s one issue; but when you look at these huge glass domes that these guys are talking about — that’s a whole separate problem.

So how is it determined whether they are safe?

We know how aluminum and titanium — the two metals of choice — work underwater. The reason we like both is because they’re the lightest metals, and they have good strength. We want them to be light, but they’ve still got to be heavier than water because we have to float them; we have to add something called syntactic foam so that, overall, the system is neutrally buoyant. 

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OceanGate submersible underwater.

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Think about what we do with our housing. We design our houses to 150% of pressure-rated depth, and then we test it to 125%, and we have a test protocol that we would use for certain systems. 

But these are systems that we know very well. What we would do with a submersible is we would take it into a pressure chamber, cycle it to 125% some number of times, and then we would hold it at that depth for a period of time — four, six or 10 hours. Then we’d have a record that says this thing has been pressure-certified. 

People build these chambers — there’s one in Woods Hole; there are bigger ones elsewhere — and you put it inside and use hydraulic pressure to pump down to those pressure. (All of this is happening inside a concrete-reinforced building, because if something fails during a pressure test, it’s a lot of energy that is released.) That’s how we do pressure testing. 

When you look at a big submersible — think, again, about the big glass dome of a submersible — there might be one place in the world where we can fit the whole thing in there and take it to pressure.

Are the design considerations different for manned vessels compared with unmanned?

Oh yes. If an AUV is designed and you lose it, you lose a million dollars, but nobody gets hurt. You can take a lot more risk in your design than you would if it were a manned submersible. If there is a person on board — I don’t care what you’re going to do, you better not hurt them. You’re not allowed to do that; it’s absolutely forbidden. So there’s a huge incentive to make the unmanned vehicles — you can take risks with them; you can be a little more forward with your thinking.

What happened to the industry after last year’s tragedy?

In short, nothing. That guy [Stockton Rush] was a renegade; he was not part of the standard industry, and wasn’t going to change how things worked. We have vehicles that are built out of carbon fiber — underwater gliders, and so on. He was so far out in left field that it just didn’t make sense. 

For one, if you look at Alvin, it has a dedicated ship with it. You look at the Japanese Shinkai 6500, it has a dedicated ship that accompanies it. It’s a huge and heavy vehicle; to get it out of the water, that lift has to be human-certified because you’re picking up a vehicle with a human in it. Not only is there a vessel, but that very vehicle has to dictate the shape of the ship. What this guy did … was take some random ship, float it behind him and tow it out. 

Well, that was probably contributing to the cycle time failure, because you’re towing it up and down on the waves as opposed to keeping it stable. It’s not just the submersible, it’s the ship. It’s the operations and maintenance; it’s how often you’re doing inspections; it’s the crew. All of that is important in conducting safe dives.

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OceanGate Was Warned of Potential for ‘Catastrophic’ Problems With Titanic Mission

Experts inside and outside the company warned of potential dangers and urged the company to undergo a certification process.

An underwater photograph of the Titan submersible, which has a small porthole at the end of the tube-shaped craft.

By Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs ,  Jenny Gross and Anna Betts

  • June 20, 2023

Years before OceanGate’s submersible craft went missing in the Atlantic Ocean with five people onboard, the company faced several warnings as it prepared for its hallmark mission of taking wealthy passengers to tour the Titanic’s wreckage.

It was January 2018, and the company’s engineering team was about to hand over the craft — named Titan — to a new crew who would be responsible for ensuring the safety of its future passengers. But experts inside and outside the company were beginning to sound alarms.

OceanGate’s director of marine operations, David Lochridge, started working on a report around that time, according to court documents, ultimately producing a scathing document in which he said the craft needed more testing and stressed “the potential dangers to passengers of the Titan as the submersible reached extreme depths.”

Two months later, OceanGate faced similarly dire calls from more than three dozen people — industry leaders, deep-sea explorers and oceanographers — who warned in a letter to its chief executive, Stockton Rush, that the company’s “experimental” approach and its decision to forgo a traditional assessment could lead to potentially “catastrophic” problems with the Titanic mission.

Now, as the international search for the craft enters another day, more is coming to light about the warnings leveled at OceanGate as the company raced to provide extreme tourism for the wealthy.

A spokesman for OceanGate declined to comment on the five-year-old critiques from Mr. Lochridge and the industry leaders. Nor did Mr. Lochridge respond to a request for comment.

Mr. Rush, the company’s chief executive, is one of the passengers on the vessel and was serving as its pilot when it went missing on Sunday, the company said on Tuesday.

An aerospace engineer and pilot, he founded the company, based in Everett, Wash., in 2009. For the past three years, he has charged up to $250,000 per person for a chance to visit the wreckage of the Titanic, which sank in 1912 on its inaugural trip from England to New York.

The critiques from Mr. Lochridge and the experts who signed the 2018 letter to Mr. Rush were focused in part on what they characterized as Mr. Rush’s refusal to have the Titan inspected and certified by one of the leading agencies that do such work.

Mr. Lochridge reported in court records that he had urged the company to do so, but that he had been told that OceanGate was “unwilling to pay” for such an assessment. After getting Mr. Lochridge’s report, the company’s leaders held a tense meeting to discuss the situation, according to court documents filed by both sides. The documents came in a lawsuit that OceanGate filed against Mr. Lochridge in 2018, accusing him of sharing confidential information outside the company.

In the documents, Mr. Lochridge reported learning that the viewport that lets passengers see outside the craft was only certified to work in depths of up to 1,300 meters.

That is far less than would be necessary for trips to the Titanic, which is nearly 4,000 meters below the ocean’s surface.

“The paying passengers would not be aware, and would not be informed, of this experimental design,” lawyers for Mr. Lochridge wrote in a court filing.

The meeting led OceanGate to fire Mr. Lochridge, according to court documents filed by both sides. OceanGate has said in court records that he was not an engineer, that he refused to accept information from the company’s engineering team and that acoustic monitoring of the hull’s strength was better than the kind of testing that Mr. Lochridge felt was necessary.

The company said in its lawsuit that it appeared Mr. Lochridge was trying to be fired. Mr. Lochridge responded by alleging wrongful termination. The legal battle ended in a settlement later in 2018.

The separate warning that OceanGate received that same year came from 38 experts in the submersible craft industry; all of them were members of the Manned Underwater Vehicles committee of the Marine Technology Society, a 60-year-old industry group that promotes, studies and teaches the public about ocean technology. The experts wrote in their letter to Mr. Rush that they had “unanimous concern” about the way the Titan had been developed, and about the planned missions to the Titanic wreckage.

The letter said that OceanGate’s marketing of the Titan had been “at minimum, misleading” because it claimed that the submersible would meet or exceed the safety standards of a risk assessment company known as DNV, even though the company had no plans to have the craft formally certified by the agency.

“Their plan of not following classification guidelines was considered very risky,” Will Kohnen, the chairman of the committee, said in an interview on Tuesday.

The industry leaders said in their letter that OceanGate should, at minimum, test its prototypes under the watch of DNV or another leading certification company.

“While this may demand additional time and expense,” the signatories wrote, “it is our unanimous view that this validation process by a third-party is a critical component in the safeguards that protect all submersible occupants.”

Mr. Kohnen said that Mr. Rush called him after reading the letter and told him that industry standards were stifling innovation.

In an unsigned 2019 blog post titled “Why Isn’t Titan Classed?,” the company made similar arguments. OceanGate said in the post that because its Titan craft was so innovative, it could take years to get it certified by the usual assessment agencies. “Bringing an outside entity up to speed on every innovation before it is put into real-world testing is anathema to rapid innovation,” the company wrote.

Another signatory of the 2018 letter, Bart Kemper, said in an interview that OceanGate had avoided having to abide by certain U.S. regulations by deploying the vessel in international waters, where Coast Guard rules did not apply.

“This letter was basically asking them to please do what the other submarines do, especially the passenger ones,” said Mr. Kemper, a forensic engineer who works on submarine designs.

Submersibles, unlike boats and other vessels, are largely unregulated, particularly when they operate in international waters, said Salvatore Mercogliano, an associate professor of maritime history at Campbell University in North Carolina.

Because the Titan is loaded onto a Canadian ship and then dropped into the North Atlantic near the Titanic, he said, it does not need to register with a country, fly a flag or follow rules that apply to many other vessels.

“It’s kind of like a boat on the back of a trailer,” Mr. Mercogliano said. “The police will ensure the trailer meets the requirements to be on the road, but they really won’t do a boat inspection.”

The Passenger Vessel Safety Act of 1993, which regulates submersibles that carry passengers and requires that they be registered with the Coast Guard, does not apply to the Titan because it does not fly an American flag or operate in American waters, he said.

Mr. Rush has spoken publicly in the past about what he viewed as regulatory red tape in the industry.

“There hasn’t been an injury in the commercial sub industry in over 35 years,” he told Smithsonian magazine in a profile published in 2019 . “It’s obscenely safe because they have all these regulations. But it also hasn’t innovated or grown — because they have all these regulations.”

In a CBS report last year, David Pogue, a former New York Times technology columnist, joined one of OceanGate’s Titanic expeditions and said the paperwork that he signed before getting onboard warned that the Titan was an “experimental vessel” that had not been “approved or certified by any regulatory body, and could result in physical injury, emotional trauma or death.”

OceanGate has made two previous expeditions to the Titanic site, in 2021 and 2022, and said in a May blog post that it “always expects new challenges” with each trip. “We’re starting our Titanic Expedition earlier than usual and have been tracking all the social media posts showing icebergs and sea ice in the area,” the post read.

The earlier trips, while largely successful, were not without problems.

In February, a couple in Florida sued Mr. Rush, saying that his company refused to refund them the $105,000 that they each paid to visit the Titanic on the Titan in 2018. The trip was postponed several times, according to the suit, in part because the company said it needed to run more tests on the Titan. The couple claimed that Mr. Rush reneged on his promise of giving them a refund and that the company instead demanded that they participate in a July 2021 voyage to the wreckage.

The lawsuit is pending and Mr. Rush has not responded to it. Court records do not list a lawyer representing him in that case.

In a court filing last year, OceanGate referenced some technical issues with the Titan during the 2021 trip.

“On the first dive to the Titanic, the submersible encountered a battery issue and had to be manually attached to its lifting platform,” the company’s legal and operational adviser, David Concannon, wrote in the document, which was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, which oversees matters having to do with the Titanic. The submersible sustained modest damage to its exterior, he wrote, leading OceanGate to cancel the mission so it could make repairs.

Still, Mr. Concannon wrote in the filing, 28 people were able to visit the Titanic wreckage on the Titan last year.

Mr. Concannon invited the federal judge who was hearing the case, Rebecca Beach Smith, to join the company for an expedition, according to a separate filing, something the judge seemed interested in doing.

“Perhaps, if another expedition occurs in the future, I will be able to do so,” the judge wrote in May, adding that after many years of hearing cases about the Titanic wreckage, “that opportunity would be quite informative and present a first ‘eyes on’ view of the wreck site by the court.”

Kitty Bennett and Susan C. Beachy contributed research. Mike Baker and Shawn Hubler contributed reporting.

Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs reports on national news. He is from upstate New York and previously reported in Baltimore, Albany, and Isla Vista, Calif. More about Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs

Jenny Gross is a general assignment reporter. Before joining The Times, she covered British politics for The Wall Street Journal. More about Jenny Gross

Anna Betts is a reporter for the National desk and a member of the 2023-2024 New York Times Fellowship class. More about Anna Betts

More From Forbes

What to eat, see and do in halifax, canada.

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A low altitude aerial view of the Halifax skyline and waterfront

Nova Scotia, in eastern Canada, has the well-deserved reputation of being one of the most welcoming and friendliest provinces. Its capital city, Halifax, serves as an excellent base for exploring the region, with popular day trips to iconic destinations like Peggy's Cove, with its famous lighthouse and Lunenburg, a UNESCO World Heritage site known for its colorful houses and famous sailboat, the Bluenose. Halifax harbor has been regenerated recently and there is now a lovely new hotel, the Muir and wide boardwalks for strolling to cafes and other waterfront attractions. And this is a town that takes going out seriously, with excellent restaurants and an astonishing (for a city of only half a million) 450 bars.

What to See and Do

Maritime Museum, Halifax

Located in the heart of Halifax’s historic waterfront, there’s no better place to immerse yourself in Nova Scotia’s rich maritime heritage than at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic . From small craft boatbuilding to World War Convoys, the Days of Sail to the Age of Steam, the Titanic to the Halifax Explosion, the museum provides a fascinating deep dive in everything related to the sea. The extensive collection of sea-related memorabilia includes the world’s largest collection of artefacts from the Titanic. There’s a fully intact deck chair, an ornate wooden piece of the dining room wall and a pair of baby shoes that belonged to one of the youngest victims. Also part of the permanent collection is a foghorn you can try out for yourself, the original lens of the oldest still working lighthouse in North America and a Victoria Cross awarded to William Hall, the first black man to receive the British military’s highest honor for bravery. Connected to the museum is a brilliant initiative, a shipbuilding school for troubled youngsters, that’s currently expanding its capacity from 80 students to 800, with a brand new building on the waterfront.

Changing of the guard at Halifax Citadel.

Raise Your Spirits! tour at Halifax Citadel, a nineteenth-century British fort perched on the hill above the city, combines history and a spirits tasting, in a special after-hours tour, with a kilted 78th Highlander as your guide. The Citadel has its own brand spirits, created by the local Compass Distillers. Noon Gun Gin, Granite and Grain Whisky and Daily Ration is paired with delicious artisanal cheeses and charcuterie.

Heidi Holloway with her paintings at Argyle Fine Art

Halifax has a thriving art scene and if you like landscape or nature art, there are a number of downtown galleries to choose from. Since 2000, Argyle Fine Art has been offering the best of Nova Scotia art to local art lovers and visitors from all over the world. The recent exhibition was The Size of Life, a lovely series of bird paintings by Lunenburg-based artist Heidi Holloway . While the focus is on emerging artists, the gallery also represents well-known artists like Gordon Macdonald. The popular, annual Pre-Shrunk show every winter features around 400 petite works, all measuring four by five inches and selling for $175 each.

The award winning Halifax Central Library on Spring Garden Road

For one of the best panoramic views of the entire city, go to the top floor of the award winning Halifax Central Public Library , a joint venture between local firm Fowler Bauld and Mitchell and Schmidt Hammer Lassen of Denmark. There’s also a cute cafe and outdoor terrace at the top.

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Best 5% interest savings accounts of 2024, day trips from halifax.

Peggy's Cove Lighthouse, Nova Scotia

If you haven’t rented a car, a great option is a guided tour from Atlantis Limousine whose friendly drivers offer a wealth of information on Halifax and the surrounding area. Essential for any visit to Nova Scotia is Peggy’s Cove , a quaint working fishing village about an hour from Halifax by car, in a beautiful, dramatic seashore setting, with a boardwalk trail across. After you’ve enjoyed a stroll across the rocks to the lighthouse and visited the artists’ studios, you’ll find the best lobster rolls for lunch at Tom’s Lobster Shack or excellent seafood chowder at the Sou’ Wester . En route to Peggy’s Cove, stop by Acadian Maple for maple syrup and various maple products, including tasty maple flavored whisky.

Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

Old Town Lunenburg , a Unesco world heritage site, is another great day trip close to Halifax. See the famous Bluenose schooner featured on Canada’s ten cent coin and the pretty colored houses. For lunch, the South Shore Fish Shack has excellent fish and chips.

Where to Stay

The living room at top suite, The Watch, The Muir, Halifax

The newest hotel in Halifax is the chic Muir hotel, located in the Queen’s Marque district, a newly regenerated waterfront neighborhood. The five star Muir has 109 suites and guest rooms, many with waterfront views, a well equipped gym and spa, an excellent restaurant and a speakeasy accessed by a secret elevator. Rooms are from $600 in low season.

Another good choice on the waterfront is the four star Westin Nova Scotian in the Halifax Seaport District near the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21.

Where to Eat and Drink

The Queen Marque area of Halifax harbor

The waterfront Queen’s Marque area is packed with restaurants, making it a great dining destination. Drift , on the ground floor of the Muir, offers exceptional seafood that’s in full supply all year round. From halibut cheeks to snow crab, haddock, and P.E.I mussels, superior seafood is a menu mainstay for Chef Lawrence Deneau and his team.

Peacock Wine Bar , with its impressive wine list and menu of seasonally inspired dishes, where vegetables and handmade pastas take starring roles, is a worthy new entry at number nine in Canada’s Top 100 Restaurants .

Nova Scotia has a fairly large French population so it’s no surprise that restaurants like Café Lunette offer a stellar range of French classics like Moules Frites Mariniere, Beouf Bourguignon and Seared Trout Amandine.

Daryâ has an Eastern Mediterranean sharing menu with tasty options like roasted cauliflower tagine, manti beef dumplings, spanakopita pie and a selection of kebabs and housemade dips.

Salt + Ash has a focus on live-fire cooking. Wood-fired pizzas, hearty meat and seafood and East Coast family-style favorites in a laid-back waterfront setting.

Bar Sofia is led by celebrated Chef Anthony Walsh, whose family’s Argentinian heritage has inspired the Latin-influenced menu with empanadas and colorful salads and hearty meat. Chef Walsh has also thoughtfully incorporated Atlantic Canadian ingredients such as Nova Scotia mackerel, lamb and salmon and Newfoundland tuna.

Seaport Social on waterfront in the Westin Hotel is a lively place for a drink and casual lunch or dinner from a maritime menu featurig fresh, seasonal, local fare. In warmer months, there’s also an outdoor patio.

Bird’s Nest Cafe , an excellent place for lunch, has a variety of sandwiches, panini, soups, salads and delicious cakes.

A Syrian refugee family based in Antingonish founded Peace By Chocolate and have a lovely shop in the Queen’s Marque area. The family were forced to leave to leave their family chocolate factory in Damascus, Syria in 2012 and rebuilt their chocolate company in Nova Scotia, opening in 2016. The delicious chocolate comes in a vast range of flavors and donates 3-5 percent of profits to the Peace On Earth Society, an organization registered in Nova Scotia that contributes funds to peace-building projects around the world.

Getting There

There are direct flights taking less than three hours on various airlines from Toronto, New York, Boston and Chicago as well as direct daily flights on Air Canada from London Heathrow.

Joanne Shurvell

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  6. Titan Submersible News

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  1. Titan submersible implosion

    On 18 June 2023, Titan, a submersible operated by the American tourism and expeditions company OceanGate, imploded during an expedition to view the wreck of the Titanic in the North Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada.Aboard the submersible were Stockton Rush, the American chief executive officer of OceanGate; Paul-Henri Nargeolet, a French deep-sea explorer and Titanic expert ...

  2. 5 aboard Titanic tourist sub dead in 'catastrophic implosion'

    June 22, 2023 Updated 5:17 PM PT. NEW YORK —. All five passengers aboard a submersible that vanished while on a dive to explore the Titanic wreck site have died, officials said Thursday after ...

  3. Titanic submersible live updates: 'Catastrophic implosion' fuels grief

    A U.S. Navy analysis of acoustic data had "detected an anomaly consistent with an implosion or explosion" near the Titan around the time it lost communications Sunday, a senior Navy official said.

  4. Titanic-bound submersible suffered 'catastrophic implosion ...

    After a dayslong, massive search for a Titanic-bound submersible that captured international attention, US authorities announced the vessel had suffered a "catastrophic implosion" - and new ...

  5. What happens during a catastrophic implosion? Titan submersible

    The Titan submersible suffered a catastrophic implosion that likely killed its pilot and four passengers instantly amid the intense water pressure in the deep North Atlantic, experts said.. Maritime researchers called an implosion the worst possible outcome of all the scenarios envisioned during the desperate round-the-clock search to find the missing vessel.

  6. June 23, 2023

    It's unclear where or how deep the Titan was when the implosion occurred, but the Titanic wreck sits nearly 13,000 feet (or almost 4,000 meters) below sea level. The submersible was about 1 hour ...

  7. Human remains and debris from sub returned to land after fatal

    June 28, 2023, 10:36 PM UTC. By Doha Madani. Human remains and debris from the submersible that imploded near the Titanic wreckage site was pulled from the depths of the ocean Wednesday, more than ...

  8. June 19, 2023

    Canadian Coast Guard/FILE. A search and rescue operation is underway for a missing submersible operated by a company that handles expeditions to the Titanic wreckage off the coast of St John's ...

  9. June 22, 2023

    James Cameron appears on CNN on Thursday, June 22. CNN. James Cameron, director of the hit 1997 film "Titanic," says news of the Titan submersible's explosion "certainly wasn't a surprise ...

  10. Missing Titanic Submersible

    OceanGate has provided tours of the Titanic wreck since 2021 — for a price of up to $250,000 per person — as part of a booming high-risk travel industry. The company has described the trip on ...

  11. Titanic sub destroyed in 'catastrophic implosion,' all five aboard dead

    The RMS Titanic, which struck an iceberg and sank during its maiden voyage in 1912, killing more than 1,500 people aboard, lies about 900 miles (1,450 km) east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and 400 ...

  12. Search Day 4: Titanic submersible debris found, all onboard presumed dead

    The debris was found off the bow of the sunken Titanic, officials said. The search for the Titan, which went missing Sunday after it e mbark ed on a mission to survey the wreckage of the Titanic ...

  13. What caused Titanic tourist sub to implode, killing 5?

    5 aboard Titanic tourist sub are dead after 'catastrophic implosion'. June 22, 2023. Officials said the debris was in an area away from the Titanic wreckage in a patch of smooth ocean floor ...

  14. The Titan submersible imploded, killing all 5 on board, the US Coast

    5 of 18 | . This photo provided by OceanGate Expeditions shows a submersible vessel named Titan used to visit the wreckage site of the Titanic. In a race against the clock on the high seas, an expanding international armada of ships and airplanes searched Tuesday, June 20, 2023, for the submersible that vanished in the North Atlantic while taking five people down to the wreck of the Titanic.

  15. What we know about the 'catastrophic implosion' that killed five men

    Wreckage of the Titan submersible was found 488 metres from the bow of the Titanic wreckage. This was 4 kilometres below the surface. A deep-sea robot operating remotely discovered debris from the ...

  16. 5 Aboard Missing Titanic Sub Presumed Dead After 'Catastrophic

    June 22, 2023. A vast multinational search for five people who had descended to view the wreckage of the sunken R.M.S. Titanic ended on Thursday after pieces of the privately owned submersible ...

  17. Titanic submarine implosion victims: The 5 men who died on Titan trip

    0:00. 1:47. Five men, including one teenager, have been declared dead days after they left for a voyage in a 22-foot submersible to see the wreckage of the Titanic in the North Atlantic Ocean ...

  18. What to Know About the Titan Submersible

    The R.M.S. Titanic, the biggest steamship in the world at the time, hit an iceberg four days into its first trans-Atlantic voyage in April 1912.. It sank to the bottom of the ocean, and more than ...

  19. What happened to the Titanic submarine? A timeline of events

    The five-person crew was dropped into the ocean in their 22-foot long submersible vessel, the Titan, around 8am EST the submersible was launched, according to the US Coast Guard. One hour and 45 ...

  20. Highlights from Day One as the search for the missing Titanic

    The submersible is part of an OceanGate Expeditions tour that offers passengers a once-in-a-lifetime experience to explore the Titanic wreckage. It went missing Sunday after it lost contact with ...

  21. Billionaire explains why he's planning voyage to Titanic site nearly

    While on a tour of the Titanic wreckage off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada, in June 2023, the OceanGate submersible imploded underwater, killing all five people on board, including OceanGate ...

  22. What we know about the missing Titanic submersible

    CNN —. Time is running out to find five people aboard a submersible missing since Sunday on what was supposed to be a roughly 10-hour round trip to see the wreck of the Titanic. Oxygen levels ...

  23. Are Upcoming Titanic Submersible Trips Any Safer from Implosion?

    Nearly a year after a submersible carrying five passengers imploded en route to the Titanic, another manned dive in the North Atlantic is reportedly in the works. GDA via AP Images Nearly a year after a submersible carrying five passengers imploded en route to the wreckage of the Titanic, another manned deep dive in the North Atlantic is ...

  24. OceanGate Was Warned of Safety Concerns with Titanic Mission

    By Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs , Jenny Gross and Anna Betts. June 20, 2023. Years before OceanGate's submersible craft went missing in the Atlantic Ocean with five people onboard, the company faced ...

  25. What To Eat, See And Do In Halifax, Canada

    From small craft boatbuilding to World War Convoys, the Days of Sail to the Age of Steam, the Titanic to the Halifax Explosion, the museum provides a fascinating deep dive in everything related to ...

  26. Una explosión en un barco mata a 6 pescadores filipinos, otros 6 son

    Más de 4.300 personas murieron en diciembre de 1987, cuando un ferry sobrecargado, el Dona Paz, se hundió tras chocar con un petrolero, en el peor desastre marítimo en tiempos de paz, que ...