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Lisbon Guru

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Getting Around Lisbon

To get around Lisbon and save money, buy the rechargeable navegante occasional card and load with a single or 24-hour ticket, or with money using the Zapping option. The card is valid for one year from the date of acquisition.

While you need a navegante or a contactless bank card to ride the metro, you can buy on board tickets in Lisbon buses, trams, funiculars and Santa Lift lift, but they’ll be more expensive than paying with a navegante card.

You can also use your navegante card on Lisbon’s commuter train system, for example to get to Sintra and Cascais, and on ferries across the River Tejo.

Here’s what you should know about the various public transport options in Lisbon.

See also: How to Use Public Transport in Lisbon – The Complete Guide

travel network lisbon

The metro is the quickest and most practical way to travel around the city. The metro network has a total of 4 lines, each identified by a different colour: green (Telheiras – Cais do Sodré), blue (Reboleira – Santa Apolónia), yellow (Odivelas – Rato) and red (Aeroporto – São Sebastião).

The metro service runs from 6.30am-1am every day.

Some metro stations are contemporary art exhibits, decorated with sculptures, mosaics, tiles and paintings, namely Olaias, Marquês de Pombal, Parque and Aeroporto stations.

Here are some useful stations to visit Lisbon’s main sights and around:

  • Baixa-Chiado (blue line): Chiado and Bairro Alto neighbourhoods , and also Príncipe Real.
  • Rossio (green line): Praça do Comércio, Rua Augusta , Praça da Figueira, Teatro Dona Maria and trains to Sintra.
  • Terreiro do Paço (blue line): Praça do Comércio and the Alfama neighbourhood.
  • Jardim Zoologico (blue line): Sete Rios, Lisbon’s long-distance bus terminal with connections to several Portuguese cities.
  • Cais do Sodré (green line): trains to Cascais and Estoril, trams and buses to Belém and ferries to Almada.
  • Oriente (red line): Parque das Nações and national and international train station.

Tram, Funicular and Lift

Lisbon Transports

Lisbon has six tram lines, three funiculars and one vertical lift operated by Carris. While still a valid transport in Lisbon, they are also a fun way to discover the city.

The vintage tram #28 is now a tourist attraction, and the most popular tram line. It runs through some of Lisbon’s most picturesque places such as Alfama, Graça and Chiado. Go early if you want to avoid the the crowds. On summer evenings, you can enjoy the views as the city becomes quiet if you take the tram between 8pm and 10pm.

Other useful lines are tram #12 that goes through the castle neighbourhood from Martim Moniz, the modern tram #15 connecting Praça da Figueira and Belém, tram #18 between Cais do Sodré and Ajuda, and tram #25 between Rua da Alfândega and Campo de Ourique via Santos, Lapa and Estrela.

Three funiculars and Santa Justa lift climb Lisbon’s steepest hills. Of course they also descend them. Provided you have strong knees, you’ll want to catch the ride up (since walking down will be easy). All are National Monuments since 2002.

travel network lisbon

Yellow buses are a good option to travel to areas that are not accessible by metro or tram. The bus network is also operated by Carris. The service runs generally from 5am to 11pm.

Here are some useful bus routes to travel around Lisbon and visit the main attractions:

  • #727 – Runs through Campo Pequeno, Marquês de Pombal Square, São Bento, Santos and Belém.
  • #728 – Runs between Belém and Parque das Nações via Santa Apolónia train station.
  • #737 – Mini bus going through Praça da Figueira, Sé, Castelo de São Jorge (castle) and the Alfama neighbourhood.
  • #744 – Connects Lisbon Airport and Saldanha, Picoas, Marquês de Pombal and Avenida da Liberdade.
  • #773 – Runs between Rato and Alcântara, via Principe Real, Estrela and Lapa.
  • #201 – Night bus that runs between Cais do Sodré and Santos (until 5am).

Timetables and route details can be found here .

There are night buses that run between the main city areas. Check the Carris Dawn network .

The commuter train operated by CP is the best option to visit attractions around Lisbon, namely Sintra and Cascais.

The train that connects Lisbon and Cascais departs from Cais do Sodré station , stopping at Santos, Belém, Alcântara-Mar, Oeiras, Monte do Estoril, and Cascais. The train station is connected to Cais do Sodré metro station (green line). The journey to Cascais offers beautiful views of the coastline, and it takes approximately 40 minutes.

Train services to Sintra depart from Rossio station, connected to the Restauradores metro station (blue line). Sintra is served by regular trains (every 15-20 minutes), and the trip takes about 45 minutes. From Sintra station, the National Palace in the historic centre is less than a 10-minute walk away. See this page for Getting Around Sintra and Cascais by Bus, Tram and Bike .

Ferries connecting Lisbon and the Tejo south bank are operated by Transtejo. Several connections per day are available from different riverfront terminals.

  • Cais do Sodré to Cacilhas (15 minutes), Montijo (30 minutes) and Seixal (30 minutes).
  • Terreiro do Paço to Barreiro (30 minutes).
  • Belém to Trafaria and Porto Brandão (20 minutes) with bus connections to Costa da Caparica beaches.

You can take an Uber in Lisbon. You need to download the smartphone app which allows you to book a car and pay for it without cash exchanged with the driver. In Lisbon, Uber cars are identified by a TVDE sticker placed on the front and rear windows of the driver’s side.

Taxis in Lisbon are not expensive when compared to other European capitals. However, depending on when and where you want to go, it may not be an option that will take you there faster (and it may not be that cheap).

If you are going out at night, a taxi ride is probably the best option if you’re returning late to your hotel. The taximeter is displayed during the entire ride, and it includes the start fee (€3.25 from 6am to 9pm, €3.90 overnight).

Although you might have heard about Lisbon taxi drivers ripping off passengers, namely by taking the longer route, most of them are honest and polite. The older ones might not speak fluent English.

Many taxis now take cards, but you should ask in advance. If you stay in a hotel, ask the receptionist to call for a taxi who accepts payment by card.

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How to Use Public Transport in Lisbon: The Complete Guide

travel network lisbon

Public transport in Lisbon

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Lisbon’s public transport system has a reputation for being modern, clean and punctual. The most comfortable means of transport from a tourist point of view is certainly the metro. You can also use trams, buses, trains or lifts such as the Elevador da Glória or the Elevador de Santa Justa.

public transport lisbon

Free public transport in Lisbon

Pour en savoir plus, vous pouvez consulter le guide Lisboa Card sur ce site ou cliquer sur la carte ci-dessous pour l’acheter directement en ligne.

If you come to visit the Portuguese capital for several days then you will surely use public transport a lot but also enjoy many guided tours of Lisbon . In this case I think the most interesting thing to do is to buy the Lisboa Card. This card is valid for 24h, 48h or 72h depending on the model you choose and will allow you to take all public transport in Lisbon for free.

Of course the card is not free but it also gives you access to a lot of discounts or free entries to different monuments of Lisbon such as the Monastery of Jerónimos, the Tower of Belem, Tramway 28 and many others.

To find out more, you can consult the Lisboa Card guide on this site or click on the map below to buy it directly online.

Acheter Lisboa Card

Click on the Lisboa Card to order it online

Lisbon transport map: Viva and 7 hills

If you wish to use the metro services, you must buy a special prepaid card: Viva Viagem or 7 colinas. The card costs €0.50 and can be bought in vending machines. You can pay in cash at the machines or by card, but be careful, I advise you to pay in hope, your foreign card might not work: don’t take the risk.

Before you can use your card, you have to reload it. What is important is that the card can work in single ticket mode (exact amount of the trip), in day ticket mode and in zapping mode.

  • Single ticket: allows you to use Lisbon’s public transport for 60 minutes from the moment of purchase, with the possibility of changing transport (Be careful, you can’t find yourself twice at the same stop, so a change in the metro is only possible if the stations are connected to each other).
  • Day ticket: allows you to use all means of transport in Lisbon for 24 hours from the moment of purchase (including lifts). A day ticket seems to be the most cost-effective option if you visit Lisbon. If you want to buy a ticket for several days, all you have to do is buy as many day tickets as there are days to use the card.
  • Zapping: this method consists of recharging your transport card from 3€ to 40€. It will be debited after each use of public transport in Lisbon. By using this formula, you will be charged for each use according to the price of the transport. This transport card also allows you to take the train to Sintra and Cascais.

transport cards Lisbon

You can only have one mode or type of ticket active at a time on your Lisbon transport card. You pay when you reload the card and can only change mode after resetting the status on the transport card or using its contents.

In theory, you can change mode on the card at the information points but you will lose money. I think that for a tourist visit to Lisbon, the best thing to do is to choose the unlimited transport card for one or more days.

Lisbon public transport prices with maps and options

  • One way by bus, tram, lift or metro – 1,50 €.
  • 24-hour ticket for tram, metro, lifts, buses – cost: 6.40 €.
  • 24-hour ticket for tram, metro, lifts, buses and ferries from Transtejo to Cacilhas – cost €9.50.
  • 24-hour ticket for trams, metro, lifts, buses and trains from CP lines Sintra, Cascais, Azambuja and Sado – cost 10.55 €.
  • Zapping option (surcharge from 3 to 40 €): valid for suburban trains, lifts, buses, subways, ferries, trams and Fertagus and MTS – Metro Sul to Tejo connections. The cost of a single journey in this case is € 1.35 by bus, lift or tram / € 1.33 by metro € 1.90 for a journey to Sintra or Cascais from Lisbon / ferries from € 1.19 to € 2.76 depending on the route chosen / Fertagus link from € 1.40 to € 4.35 depending on the route / metro Sul to Tejo € 0.85 per journey.

Transport ticket dispenser Lisbon

Where to buy public transport tickets in Lisbon

Tickets for all public transport in Lisbon can be purchased in the most popular public transport locations: in the yellow boxes marked with the Carris company stamp, in some post offices, in all underground stations and train stations, as well as at kiosks and service points (blue sign on white background).

It is also possible to buy a transport ticket in Lisbon directly from the driver, in some means of transport but the ticket will usually be more expensive. Tickets for a specific rail link are bought at stations, the same applies to ferry crossings.

  • With the driver: you can buy tickets for buses, trams and ski lifts but they are more expensive.
  • At each metro station in Lisbon: you can buy individual tickets for the metro, bus, tram or lift, as well as 24-hour tickets with or without the “Zapping” option. Tickets can be purchased from special blue or yellow machines and at the ticket office.
  • In the points marked with “MOB” you can buy individual journeys by metro, bus, lift and tram. Tickets with the option of “Zapping” and 24-hour tickets. Such points can be found for example under the Santa Justa lift , near the Santa Apolonia station or in the kiosks of Cais de Sodre.
  • In the stations: you can buy single train journeys or season tickets there. Tickets can be purchased from special green vending machines and at the ticket office.
  • At the ferry stations: here you will find tickets with the “Zapping” option or single tickets for ferry crossings. Tickets can be purchased at the ticket office or from special vending machines.
  • On tram 15, in special machines.

Means of transport in Lisbon

Carris is the company responsible for bus, lift and tram services in Lisbon. For these means of transport, you can buy a more expensive ticket on board or use a prepaid card. You enter the bus through the first door, the front door. In the case of the Santa Justa lift, you can buy a ticket for both directions directly at the ticket office. The official Carris website provides a lot of updated information that will help you plan your transportation.

If you plan to go to Sintra and Cascais , you can buy a train and bus ticket, which allows you to travel 24 hours a day to Lisbon and use the changes to : Sintra, Cascais, Azambuja and Sado. Before buying your ticket, it is best to do your calculations to calculate the best price.

You will be able to consult the timetables on the official CP website which manages train transport around Lisbon.

Metro in Lisbon

The metro, as is usually the case in large cities, is one of the most popular and convenient means of transport in Lisbon. The different lines of the Lisbon metro are marked in yellow, green, blue and red (each has its own name but it is the use of the names of the colors that has become more popular and most convenient for visitors).

Many subway stations in Lisbon are beautiful enough to be pleasant to visit: decorations, references to history, azulejos :

  • Green line – Linha Verde
  • Blue line – Linha Azul
  • Yellow line – Linha Amarela
  • Red line – Linha Vermelha

Lisbon metro map

Elevators in Lisbon

A popular means of public transportation among tourists are elevators. Many do not know it when they come to visit Lisbon but the elevator is indeed a means of transport in the Portuguese capital used every day by the Portuguese, just like the tramway 28.

You will find below the prices and schedules of the different lifts in Lisbon :

  • Elevador de Santa Justa: the only vertical lift in Lisbon, it operates every day in summer (March-October) from 7:00 am to 11:00 pm and in winter (November-February) from 7:00 am to 9:00 pm. The return ticket costs €5.15. The Miradouro at the top of the Santa Justa lift is open from 9:00 am to 11:00 pm (9:00 pm in winter).
  • Elevador da Glória: cable car in service since 1885, open daily Monday to Thursday from 7.15 am to 11.55 pm, Friday from 7.15 am to 00.25 am, Saturday from 8.45 am to 00.25 am and Sunday and public holidays from 9.15 am to 11.55 am. The price of the ticket is 3,70€.
  • Elevador da Bica: in service since 1892, it can be used Monday to Saturday from 7:00 to 21:00 and Sundays and holidays from 9:00 to 21:00. The ticket will cost you 3,70€.
  • Elevador à Lavra: in service since 1884, it operates every day from Monday to Saturday from 7.50 am to 7.55 pm and on Sundays and public holidays from 9.00 am to 7.55 pm, the ticket costs €3.70 (as for the two previous lifts in Lisbon).

Lisbon lift

Lisbon’s historic tramways

Lisbon’s Tramway 28 is probably the most common symbol in photos and postcards of the Portuguese capital. Lisbon trams appeared as early as 1873, when they were pulled on the rails by horses.

In 1901 the trams were connected to the electricity grid and just over 50 years later the city operates almost 30 tram lines. The development of the metro slowly diminished the importance of Lisbon’s tram network until most of the lines were closed.

There are now 5 tramway lines in Lisbon, most of which are operated by small historic trams called Remodelado and serve more as tourist attractions. This does not mean that they are not used every day as a means of transport by the people of Lisbon, some of them have never left!

The most famous historical tramway line is line 28, which will take you through many historical districts such as Alfama, Estrela, Sao Bento and Graca. The tram passes in front of the cathedral and crosses Portas Square to Sol, from where you can walk to the Castle of Saint George . The Remodelado trams are original. Only some of their mechanisms, such as the brakes, have been improved.

When you get on the Lisbon trams, remember to hold on tightly. The seats are uncomfortable but this does not spoil the charm and quality of the ride. During the summer, you will have very little chance of finding a seat.

Tramway line 28 starts at 5 am and ends at 11 pm. In the middle of the day, the trams run several times an hour.

Lisbon tramway

Other tramway lines in Lisbon

  • Tramway 12: a four-kilometre tramway line running around Alfama and Baix. The tramway has part of the route in common with tram 28 and the whole journey takes about 20 minutes. This line is often less busy and you can find a seat before entering Alfama, one of Lisbon’s districts.
  • Tramway 15: line served by modern low-floor trams. It runs through the waterfront from the centre of Lisbon to the Belém district.
  • Tram 18: Tram number 18 runs from Cais station in Sodré to the Ajuda district, where the National Palace of Ajuda and the Botanical Garden (Jardim Botânico da Ajuda) are located.
  • Tram 25 runs on the road between Campo Ourique (Prazeres) – Martim Moniz.

Les tickets peuvent être achetés dans le tramway auprès du conducteur (ils sont plus chers) ou en utilisant les fonds de votre carte prépayée. Dans le cas d’un tram se rendant à Belém, il est possible d’acheter des tickets dans le distributeur automatique. Dans un tramway bondé, méfiez-vous des pickpockets !

Lisbon transport: some advice and information

  • For buses and trams, enter through the first door next to the driver. The exception is tram 15, where this rule does not apply.
  • The ticket is validated when the green light comes on. When the red light comes on, it means that the ticket has not been validated and you have to pass the card back through the reader. Place the card on the red dot and wait for a moment.
  • Buses and trams do not stop at stops if the driver is not informed of your intention to leave the vehicle (by pressing the “Parar” button).
  • In some railway stations (e.g. St Apolonia or Estoril), the ticket must be validated before boarding the platform.
  • Public transport in Lisbon is efficient and serves the city well. It is preferable to use it rather than a car.
  • The metro runs from 6:30 am to 1:00 am.
  • Fines here are high and can reach 100 to 150 times the ticket price. I therefore do not advise you to travel around Lisbon without a valid ticket.
  • Carris trams and buses can only carry hand luggage.
  • Beware of pickpockets in Lisbon.
  • Cais do Sodre is a central transport hub in Lisbon: you will find buses, metro, trains, trams and ferries.
  • Taxis in Lisbon are more accessible than in other European capitals and in some cases can be a good alternative.

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The Ultimate Guide To Getting Around Lisbon By Public Transportation

The Ultimate Guide To Getting Around Lisbon By Public Transportation

Introduction

Welcome to the ultimate guide to getting around Lisbon by public transportation! As one of the most beautiful and vibrant cities in Europe, Lisbon offers a variety of transportation options to help you navigate its charming neighborhoods and iconic landmarks. Whether you’re a first-time visitor or a seasoned traveler, understanding and utilizing the city’s public transportation system will greatly enhance your experience and make exploring this enchanting city a breeze.

With its extensive network of metro lines, trams, buses, ferries, and trains, Lisbon offers a comprehensive public transportation system that is efficient, affordable, and convenient. This guide will provide you with all the information you need to navigate the city like a local, from understanding each mode of transportation to getting the best deals on tickets and passes.

By opting for public transportation, you’ll not only save time but also have the opportunity to immerse yourself in the local culture, observe the daily life of Lisboetas, and get a glimpse of the city’s stunning architecture and breathtaking views.

So, whether you’re planning to visit iconic landmarks like the Jeronimos Monastery, explore the vibrant neighborhoods of Alfama and Bairro Alto, or simply meander through the charming streets of Lisbon, this guide will help you discover the best ways to get around the city.

Without further ado, let’s dive into the wonderful world of public transportation in Lisbon and embark on an unforgettable journey through this magnificent city!

Overview of Public Transportation in Lisbon

Lisbon boasts a well-connected and efficient public transportation system that makes getting around the city a breeze. With options ranging from the metro, trams, buses, ferries, and trains, you’ll have no trouble reaching your desired destinations.

The public transportation network in Lisbon is managed by Carris, which operates the trams and buses, and Metropolitano de Lisboa, which oversees the metro system. Additionally, the city’s train services are managed by CP (Comboios de Portugal) and ferry services by Transtejo & Soflusa.

From the historic neighborhoods of Alfama and Baixa to the modern Parque das Nações and the beautiful waterfront area of Belém, Lisbon’s public transportation system covers every corner of the city, ensuring easy access to all the major landmarks and attractions.

One of the perks of using public transportation in Lisbon is that it is not only reliable but also affordable. With various ticketing options available, you can choose the one that best suits your needs, whether you’re a short-term visitor or a long-term resident.

Moreover, Lisbon’s public transportation system is designed to be user-friendly, with clear signage, maps, and announcements in both Portuguese and English. This makes it easy for visitors to navigate their way around the city even if they don’t speak the local language.

Throughout this guide, we will delve deeper into each mode of transportation, providing you with valuable information on how to use them, the best routes to take, and tips to make your journey a smooth one. So, get ready to explore Lisbon’s public transportation system and discover the wonders of this captivating city!

Types of Public Transportation

Lisbon offers a diverse range of public transportation options to cater to different travel preferences and needs. Understanding each mode of transportation will help you choose the most convenient and efficient option for your journeys throughout the city.

Metro System: The metro system in Lisbon is a popular choice for locals and visitors alike. With four lines covering the city and its suburbs, it provides a fast and efficient way to navigate through Lisbon’s major neighborhoods and attractions. The metro operates from 6:30 AM until 1:00 AM, with trains running at regular intervals.

Trams: Lisbon is renowned for its historic tram system, known as “elétricos.” Riding the iconic trams is not only a practical mode of transportation but also a unique experience that takes you back in time. Tram 28, in particular, is a favorite among tourists as it passes through the city’s historic districts, offering picturesque views of narrow streets and charming architecture.

Buses: Carris operates a comprehensive bus network that covers all areas of Lisbon. Buses are an excellent option for reaching destinations not covered by the metro or tram lines. With a wide range of routes and frequent service, buses provide a convenient way to explore both the city center and the outskirts.

Ferries and Riverboats: With the Tagus River flowing through Lisbon, ferries and riverboats are an enjoyable mode of transportation, offering scenic views of the city’s skyline and waterfront. These services connect Lisbon with nearby locations such as Cacilhas, Seixal, and Montijo, providing a unique perspective of the city from the water.

Train Services: Lisbon’s train services are ideal for exploring attractions beyond the city limits. CP operates suburban and regional trains that connect Lisbon with other towns and cities in the surrounding area. If you’re looking to visit popular destinations like Cascais or Sintra, taking a train is a convenient and efficient choice.

Each mode of transportation in Lisbon has its own advantages and unique charm. Depending on your destination and itinerary, you can choose the most appropriate option to ensure a seamless and enjoyable journey throughout the city.

Metro System

The metro system in Lisbon is a convenient and efficient way to travel around the city and its suburbs. With four lines, each color-coded for easy navigation, the metro covers a significant portion of Lisbon, making it a popular mode of transportation for both locals and tourists.

The four metro lines are:

  • Blue Line (Linha Azul): This line connects Santa Apolónia in the eastern part of the city to Amadora Este in the northwest, passing through important stations such as Baixa-Chiado, Rossio, and Marquês de Pombal.
  • Yellow Line (Linha Amarela): The yellow line runs from Rato in the city center to Odivelas in the northeast, passing through key stations like Marquês de Pombal, Campo Pequeno, and Entrecampos.
  • Green Line (Linha Verde): This line connects Cais do Sodré in the city center to Telheiras in the northwest, passing through popular neighborhoods like Baixa-Chiado, Rossio, and Alameda.
  • Red Line (Linha Vermelha): The red line runs from São Sebastião in the city center to Aeroporto in the northeast, with stops at important locations such as Saldanha, Alameda, and Oriente.

The metro operates from 6:30 AM until 1:00 AM, with trains running at regular intervals, usually every 6 to 12 minutes depending on the time of day and the line. During rush hours, trains tend to be more frequent to accommodate the high volume of commuters.

Using the metro is fairly straightforward. Stations are equipped with ticket machines where you can purchase single journey tickets or rechargeable cards. It is advisable to buy a rechargeable card if you plan on using the metro frequently, as it offers more convenience and potential cost savings.

The metro system in Lisbon is known for its cleanliness, efficiency, and safety. Signs and announcements in both Portuguese and English make it easy to navigate through the stations and transfer between lines. The metro stations are also equipped with elevators and escalators to ensure accessibility for everyone.

Whether you’re traveling for sightseeing, shopping, or commuting, the metro system in Lisbon provides a reliable and efficient way to get around. With its extensive coverage and user-friendly infrastructure, exploring the city’s diverse neighborhoods and attractions has never been easier.

Trams are an iconic mode of transportation in Lisbon and offer a charming way to explore the city while taking in its unique heritage and architectural beauty. Known locally as “elétricos,” these historic trams have been an integral part of Lisbon’s transportation system for over a century.

The most famous tram route in Lisbon is Tram 28, which winds its way through the narrow streets and steep hills of the city’s historic neighborhoods. This tram ride is a must-do for visitors as it passes through popular attractions such as Graça, Alfama, and Baixa, offering picturesque views of traditional tiled facades and cobblestone streets.

Tram 15 is another popular route that connects the neighborhoods of Praça da Figueira and Belém. This scenic tram ride takes you along the banks of the Tagus River, passing by landmarks such as the Jerónimos Monastery and the Belém Tower.

Lisbon’s trams are not only a means of transportation but also an enchanting way to experience the city’s charm. Riding on a tram allows you to immerse yourself in the local culture and witness the vibrant daily life of Lisbon. The wooden interiors, rattling tracks, and nostalgic ambiance create a unique journey back in time.

It’s important to note that due to their popularity, trams can get crowded, especially during peak hours and tourist seasons. If you plan on taking Tram 28, it’s advisable to board at the starting points, such as Martim Moniz or Campo Ourique, to secure a seat and get the full experience of the ride.

Tickets for trams can be purchased on board from the driver or at small kiosks located at key tram stops. It’s essential to have the correct change when buying tickets on board, as the drivers usually don’t carry a large amount of cash. You can also use a rechargeable card such as the Viva Viagem card, which can be used for multiple modes of transportation in Lisbon.

Exploring Lisbon on a tram is undoubtedly a memorable experience, allowing you to discover the city’s rich history and vibrant atmosphere. Whether you’re a history enthusiast, a photographer, or simply seeking a romantic way to travel, hop on a tram and let its rhythmic journey transport you through the heart of Lisbon.

Buses in Lisbon are an integral part of the city’s public transportation network, offering a convenient and extensive system to help you reach your desired destinations. Operated by Carris, the bus network covers all areas of Lisbon, including the city center, residential neighborhoods, and the outskirts.

With a wide range of routes and frequent service, buses provide a flexible and accessible mode of transportation for both residents and visitors. Whether you’re looking to explore popular tourist areas or venture off the beaten path, there is likely a bus route that can take you there.

Bus stops are marked throughout the city and are usually equipped with timetables and route maps to assist you in planning your journey. Newer buses even have electronic signage displaying the upcoming stops, making it easier to navigate and ensure you get off at the correct location.

One of the advantages of taking the bus is the opportunity to see the city from a different perspective. As the bus winds its way through the streets of Lisbon, you’ll have the chance to admire the charming architecture, local markets, and the daily life of Lisboetas.

It’s important to note that during peak hours, buses can get crowded, particularly on popular routes. If you prefer a more comfortable ride, it’s advisable to plan your trips outside of rush hour when possible.

Tickets for buses can be purchased directly from the driver upon boarding. It’s important to have the correct change, as drivers may not be able to provide change for larger bills. Alternatively, you can use a rechargeable card such as the Viva Viagem card, which can be used for seamless transfers between buses, trams, and the metro.

Whether you’re venturing out to explore Lisbon’s historic sites, visiting local markets, or simply getting from point A to point B, buses offer a reliable and economical way to navigate the city. So hop on a bus, sit back, and let Lisbon’s vibrant streets unfold before your eyes.

Ferries and Riverboats

With the Tagus River flowing through the heart of Lisbon, ferries and riverboats provide a unique and picturesque way to navigate the city and discover its surrounding areas. These water-based modes of transportation offer not only a convenient way to travel but also stunning views of Lisbon’s skyline and waterfront.

The ferry and riverboat services in Lisbon are operated by Transtejo & Soflusa, connecting various points along the Tagus River. These services allow you to explore destinations both within Lisbon and across the river.

One popular ferry route is the one connecting Cais do Sodré to Cacilhas. This short journey takes you to the south bank of the Tagus River, where you can visit the picturesque town of Cacilhas, known for its seafood restaurants and stunning views of Lisbon.

Another popular route is the one connecting Belém to Trafaria. This ferry ride takes you to the beautiful beaches of Costa da Caparica, perfect for a day of sun, sand, and surf.

In addition to the regular ferry services, Lisbon also offers riverboat tours along the Tagus River. These tours provide a leisurely way to enjoy the city’s sights and landmarks from a different perspective. Whether you choose a short sightseeing cruise or a longer excursion, you’ll have the opportunity to see iconic landmarks such as the Belém Tower, the 25th of April Bridge, and the Christ the King statue.

Tickets for the ferries and riverboats can be purchased at the respective docks before boarding. It’s important to check the schedules in advance, as the frequency of these services may vary throughout the day and across different seasons.

Whether you’re looking to explore the outskirts of Lisbon, visit charming riverside towns, or simply enjoy a relaxing cruise along the Tagus River, ferries and riverboats offer a delightful and scenic way to experience the beauty of the city and its surroundings.

Train Services

Lisbon’s train services provide a convenient and efficient mode of transportation for both short and long-distance journeys. Operated by CP (Comboios de Portugal), the train network connects Lisbon with various towns and cities in the surrounding area, making it an ideal choice for exploring beyond the city limits.

One of the popular routes from Lisbon is the train journey to Cascais. This scenic coastal town, located to the west of Lisbon, offers beautiful beaches, charming streets, and a vibrant atmosphere. The train ride from Lisbon to Cascais takes approximately 30 minutes and is a popular choice for a day trip or a relaxing seaside getaway.

Another popular train destination is Sintra, a UNESCO World Heritage site known for its fairytale-like palaces and lush landscapes. The journey from Lisbon to Sintra takes around 40 minutes and offers stunning views along the way. Once in Sintra, you can explore the historic town center, visit the enchanting Pena Palace, and immerse yourself in the magical atmosphere of this unique destination.

Train services from Lisbon also connect to other towns and cities, such as Setúbal, Évora, and Porto. These destinations are known for their cultural heritage, historical significance, and gastronomic delights, offering a wealth of experiences for travelers to enjoy.

When using the train services in Lisbon, it’s advisable to check the schedules in advance, as the frequency and availability of trains may vary depending on the route and time of day. Tickets can be purchased at the train stations or online, and it’s recommended to book in advance, especially during peak travel seasons.

The trains in Lisbon are typically comfortable and equipped with amenities such as air conditioning, free Wi-Fi, and ample seating. Whether you’re traveling for leisure or commuting, the train services provide a reliable and enjoyable way to reach your desired destination with ease.

So, if you’re looking to explore the picturesque coastal towns, historic sites, or vibrant cities near Lisbon, hop on a train and embark on an unforgettable journey through the stunning landscapes of Portugal.

Ticketing and Fares

Understanding the ticketing system and fares in Lisbon’s public transportation network is essential to ensure a smooth and hassle-free journey. Here is a breakdown of the ticketing options and fare structure to help you navigate the city’s transportation system.

Single Journey Tickets: For occasional travelers, single journey tickets can be purchased for the desired mode of transportation directly from ticket machines or in-person at ticket offices. These tickets are valid for a single trip and cannot be used for transfers or multiple journeys.

Rechargeable Cards: For frequent travelers, rechargeable cards such as the Viva Viagem card are a convenient option. These cards can be loaded with credit and used across multiple modes of transportation, including the metro, trams, buses, and some train lines. Rechargeable cards offer cost savings compared to single journey tickets and can be easily topped up at various ticket machines and authorized vendors throughout the city.

24-hour and 72-hour Travel Cards: If you plan on using public transportation extensively during your stay, consider purchasing a 24-hour or 72-hour travel card. These cards provide unlimited travel on the metro, trams, buses, and some train lines within the purchased time frame. They offer convenience and potential cost savings for travelers who plan to explore the city extensively.

Zapping: Zapping is another payment option available on the Viva Viagem card. With zapping, you can load the card with a specific amount of credit and use it for individual journeys at discounted fares compared to single journey tickets.

It’s important to validate your ticket or card before boarding the metro, trams, and buses. Failure to do so may result in a fine if checked by a ticket inspector.

Fares are determined based on the number of zones traveled and the type of ticket or card used. The city of Lisbon is divided into different zones, with the city center being Zone 1 and the outer areas forming higher numbered zones. The fare varies depending on the zones covered during your journey.

Children, seniors, and individuals with disabilities are eligible for discounted fares. To obtain the discounted fare, proper identification or documentation may be required.

It’s worth noting that the same Viva Viagem card can be used by multiple individuals, as long as there is enough credit or valid travel passes loaded onto the card.

By familiarizing yourself with the ticketing options and fare structure, you can navigate Lisbon’s public transportation system confidently and choose the most cost-effective option for your travel needs.

Using a Travel Card

A travel card, such as the Viva Viagem card, is a convenient and cost-effective way to navigate Lisbon’s public transportation system. Here’s a guide on how to use a travel card and the benefits it offers.

1. Obtaining a Travel Card: Travel cards can be easily obtained at various locations, including metro stations, kiosks, and some convenience stores. The Viva Viagem card is a rechargeable card that can be used for multiple modes of transportation, including the metro, trams, buses, and some train lines.

2. Loading Credit or Travel Pass: Once you have the travel card, you can load it with credit or purchase a travel pass. Credit can be loaded onto the card at ticket machines or authorized vendors. For frequent travelers, purchasing a 24-hour or 72-hour travel pass offers unlimited travel within the chosen time frame.

3. Validating the Card: Before boarding the metro, trams, or buses, it’s crucial to validate your travel card. Look for the card reader at the entrance of the station or inside the vehicles. Simply tap your card on the reader and wait for the validation sound or message before proceeding.

4. Transfers: With a travel card, you can enjoy seamless transfers between different modes of transportation, as long as the transfers fall within the time validity of your card or pass. For example, if you validate your card on a bus and then transfer to the metro or tram within the allowed time, you will not be charged for a separate ticket.

5. Recharging the Card: If your travel card runs out of credit, you can easily recharge it at ticket machines or authorized vendors. Choose the appropriate option on the machine, insert your card, and follow the prompts to add the desired amount of credit to your card.

6. Checking the Balance: To check the balance on your travel card, you can use the ticket machines at the metro stations or ask a staff member for assistance. Some ticket machines also allow you to print a receipt with your current card balance.

Using a travel card not only provides convenience but also potential savings, as the fares for each trip using a card are usually lower than purchasing individual single journey tickets. Additionally, the card eliminates the need for carrying cash or searching for exact change whenever you need to travel.

Remember to keep your travel card in a safe place and protect it like you would any other valuable item. Losing the card can result in the loss of any remaining credits or passes loaded onto it.

By using a travel card, you can navigate Lisbon’s public transportation system effortlessly and enjoy the flexibility and cost savings it provides.

Best Apps for Navigating Lisbon’s Public Transportation

Navigating public transportation in Lisbon has become even more convenient with the help of modern technology. Several apps are available that can assist you in planning your routes, checking timetables, and getting real-time updates on public transportation in the city. Here are some of the best apps for navigating Lisbon’s public transportation:

1. Carris mobile: The Carris mobile app is the official app of the public transportation company in Lisbon. It provides information about tram and bus routes, schedules, and real-time tracking of vehicles. The app also offers features such as trip planning, nearby stop search, and estimated arrival times.

2. Metropolitano de Lisboa: The official app of the Lisbon metro system, Metropolitano de Lisboa, is a useful tool for navigating the metro network. It provides information on the metro lines, stations, and schedules. The app also includes a journey planner feature, allowing you to easily plan your route and estimate travel times.

3. Citymapper: Citymapper is a popular transit app that covers various cities around the world, including Lisbon. It offers detailed information on public transportation options, including metro, buses, trams, and even alternative transportation methods such as bikes and ride-sharing services. The app provides real-time updates, route planning, and step-by-step directions to help you navigate the city efficiently.

4. Moovit: Moovit is another popular transit app that covers Lisbon and many other cities worldwide. It offers real-time information on buses, trams, metro, and trains, allowing you to plan your journey and receive live updates on arrivals and departures. The app also includes features like trip planning, route options, and service alerts.

5. Uber and Bolt: While not specifically public transportation apps, ride-sharing services like Uber and Bolt can be useful alternatives for getting around Lisbon, especially for late-night travel or when public transportation options are limited. These apps allow you to request a car service and pay conveniently through the app.

These apps can greatly enhance your experience in navigating Lisbon’s public transportation system. They offer real-time information, trip planning features, and other helpful tools to ensure you make the most of your time in the city and reach your destinations efficiently.

Remember to have a stable internet connection while using these apps, either through mobile data or by connecting to a Wi-Fi network. Be sure to download the apps from trusted sources and read user reviews to ensure you choose the most reliable and up-to-date options.

By utilizing these apps, you’ll have all the information you need at your fingertips to confidently explore Lisbon’s public transportation network and make your journey through the city even more seamless.

Tips for Getting Around Lisbon Efficiently

Getting around Lisbon’s bustling cityscape can be a breeze with a few insider tips. Here are some valuable tips to help you navigate the city’s public transportation system efficiently:

1. Use Rechargeable Travel Cards: Consider using a rechargeable travel card, such as the Viva Viagem card, for seamless transfers across various modes of transportation. These cards save you time and hassle, providing convenient access to the metro, trams, buses, and some train lines without the need to purchase individual tickets for each journey.

2. Avoid Peak Hours: If possible, plan your travels outside of peak hours, especially when using crowded modes of transportation like the metro and buses. Rush hour in Lisbon typically occurs from 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM and from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM on weekdays.

3. Be Prepared for Crowded Trams: Lisbon’s historic tram lines, particularly Tram 28, can get extremely crowded, especially during peak tourist seasons. To make the most of your tram ride, consider starting your journey at the initial stops to secure a seat and have a comfortable and enjoyable experience.

4. Take Advantage of Ferry Rides: Enjoy a unique perspective of Lisbon by taking a ferry ride along the Tagus River. Ferries connect various points along the river, offering scenic views of the city’s skyline and historic waterfront areas. It’s a refreshing and delightful way to explore Lisbon and its surrounding areas.

5. Explore on Foot: Lisbon’s compact size and pedestrian-friendly streets make it a great city for exploring on foot. Many of the city’s attractions are within a reasonable walking distance of each other, allowing you to soak in the charming neighborhoods, vibrant markets, and historical sites at your own pace.

6. Take Advantage of Apps and Online Resources: Make use of helpful apps and websites that provide real-time information on public transportation schedules, routes, and service updates. These resources can save you time and ensure you stay informed about any changes or delays that may affect your journey.

7. Plan for Extra Time: It’s always a good idea to plan for extra time when using public transportation in Lisbon. Although the system is generally reliable, unforeseen circumstances such as traffic or unexpected delays can occur. Allowing a buffer of extra time ensures you arrive at your destination without feeling rushed.

8. Respect Etiquette and Priority Seating: When using public transportation, it’s important to be mindful of fellow passengers. Offer your seat to those in need, including seniors, pregnant women, and individuals with disabilities. Follow the designated etiquette, such as letting people off the vehicle before boarding, to ensure a smooth and respectful journey for everyone.

By following these tips, you can navigate Lisbon’s public transportation system efficiently, make the most of your time in the city, and have a smooth and enjoyable travel experience. Whether you’re exploring the historic neighborhoods, visiting iconic landmarks, or venturing beyond the city, efficient transportation will enhance your overall Lisbon adventure.

Navigating Lisbon’s public transportation system is the key to unlocking the wonders of this captivating city. With its extensive network of metro lines, historic trams, buses, ferries, and trains, Lisbon offers a comprehensive and efficient transportation system that makes getting around a breeze.

In this ultimate guide, we have explored the different modes of public transportation available in Lisbon and provided valuable information on how to navigate and optimize your journeys. From the efficient metro system to the charming trams and the convenient bus network, each mode of transportation offers a unique experience that allows you to immerse yourself in the local culture, discover hidden gems, and explore the city’s vibrant neighborhoods.

Travel cards, such as the Viva Viagem card, provide a convenient and cost-effective way to travel across various modes of transportation. With their ease of use and flexibility, these cards eliminate the hassle of buying individual tickets for each journey, and they allow for seamless transfers between different modes of transportation.

By taking advantage of helpful apps like Carris mobile, Metropolitano de Lisboa, Citymapper, and Moovit, you can further enhance your travel experience in Lisbon. These apps provide real-time information, route planning features, and live updates to ensure you reach your destinations efficiently and stay informed about any changes or delays.

As you explore Lisbon’s public transportation system, remember to consider factors like peak hours, crowded trams, and the benefits of exploring on foot. Planning for extra time and respecting fellow passengers’ needs contribute to a smoother and more enjoyable journey for everyone.

With this comprehensive guide and the tips provided, you are well equipped to navigate Lisbon’s public transportation system like a local. So, hop on the metro, catch a tram, or board a ferry, and embark on an unforgettable journey through the vibrant streets, historic sites, and breathtaking views of Lisbon.

Enjoy your travels and make the most of this incredible city!

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Lisbon Public Transport explained – 5+ tips to help you get around the city

Lisbon has an extensive public transport network, and it is easy to explore the city by bus, tram and metro. When visiting Lisbon, it’s the easiest way to get around. But how does the public transportation system in Lisbon work? And when does it make sense to buy a Lisboa Card instead or separate tickets? Let’s dive in so you’ll travel like a local in no time!

Tram 28 Alfama

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A quick overview: Lisbon Public Transport

  • What you ‘ ll  discover?  Learn how the public transport system in Lisbon works.
  • Costs?  Tickets are from € 1,80 and up.
  • Where?  In Lisbon, the Portuguese capital.
  • Worth it?  Yes! Travel like a pro at a fraction of the price of a taxi.

Tram 28 Alfama

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The public transportation system in Lisbon

You bet public transportation comes in handy in  a city with seven hills ! Lisbon is famous for its colourful trams and funiculars, but there are many other easy ways to get around the city.

The transport system in Lisbon includes  buses, trains, metro, trams, funiculars and ferries ! The stations are overall very well connected, and it’s pretty easy to get around.

Tram 28 Alfama

The Lisbon metro

The  metro network in Lisbon has four lines : blue, yellow, green and red. The Lisbon metro system comprises 55 metro stations, and the track length is 46 kilometres long. You never have to wait long as the following metro  usually departs within 6 or 7 minutes . It makes it one of the easiest ways to discover Lisbon!

Metro services, including weekends and public holidays,  start at 6:30 AM and run until 1 AM . Just be aware that sometimes the metro operates with shorter trains at night, so it’s recommended to wait at the platform’s lefthand side (in the direction the metro travels). The  metro runs north, south, and east  of the city. You can buy metro tickets at the ticket machines at the station.

The Lisbon metro lines are:

  • Blue line: between Reboleira and Santa Apolónia
  • Yellow line: between Odivelas and Rato
  • Green line: between Telheiras and Cais de Sodré
  • Red line: between Aeroporto and São Sebastião (this is extended to the west towards Alcântara)

Lisbon-metro-map

Travelling from the airport to the city centre by metro

Lisbon Airport Humberto Delgado  is very well connected to the city centre. Aside from a taxi or  private transport , you can travel to the centre by bus or metro. The  metro station is located at Terminal 1 , and once you’ve taken the escalators downstairs, you’ll see the ticket machines where you can purchase your Navegante occasional ticket. To read the complete guide about Lisbon Airport,  please click here .

The  red line connects the airport with the city centre , as the metro map shows. Taking the metro to your hotel is a good alternative to the more expensive taxis.

Suburban trains, buses, trams, and taxis in Lisbon

Getting around Lisbon is super easy, but you might be a bit confused when you first arrive. With these  tips about transport in Lisbon , you´ll travel like a local in no time! Let´s learn more about the city’s trains, ferries, buses, trams and taxis.

Lisbon urban trains to Sintra, Cascais, Azambuja and Sado

There are 67 stations divided over four lines:

  • Cascais lin e
  • Sintra line
  • Azambuja line

The train to Cascais

If you want to travel towards the west, to places like  Cascais and Belém , it’s recommended to take the Cascais line. From  Cais do Sodré  train station, you can take a fast train that stops only at particular stations or a train that stops at every single station. Please be aware that your ticket might only be  valid within specific parameters  in the city center.

After Belém, you’ll need an  extended ticket  to travel to Algés, Oeiras or Cascais.  Zone 1 is within the Lisboa district  only, which you can see on the map below. Train tickets can be purchased at the train station at Cais do Sodré. If you bought the  Navegante occasional reusable card  for € 0.50, a single trip to Cascais will cost € 2.30. There are no round-trip tickets, but you can simply swipe your card again. It’s  a 40-minute journey , and trains depart every 20 to 30 minutes.

Train network Lisbon

The train to Sintra

From Rossio station or Oriente , you can make your way to the famous sights in Sintra. The Sintra line stops at multiple train stations, but most people will head straight to Sintra. The train journey  takes around 40 minutes from Rossio  station. Rossio is the most accessible place to board if you stay in Baixa, Alfama, or Bairro Alto.

From Oriente to Sintra, the trip takes just under 50 minutes. If you come straight from the airport, this line is super easy to use. A  single journey costs € 2.40, and a return ticket costs € 4.80 (you can buy return tickets in Sintra; these are 2024 prices). They depart every 20 to 30 minutes.

Sintra day trips from Lisbon

Travelling to Azambuja

The Azambuja line runs  between Santa Apolónia station and Azambuja . It will stop at Oriente Station, but otherwise, tourists don’t often use this line. The total trip takes around 1 hour.

The Sado line

The Sado line  crosses the river Tejo . When you take the ferry from Terreiro do Paço to Barreiro, you can travel from the ferry port to Praca do Quebedo in Setúbal. You can buy tickets at all major train stations. This line is also much used by commuters, but  Setúbal is a fantastic city  to visit. There are also trains from Sete-Rios.

The bus in Lisbon

Carris is the bus company  that will take you from A to B in Lisbons city centre. There are many different Lisbon buses, and the city is well-connected. For real-time information, you can  use the Carris App . It will advise of waiting times and the nearest stops. Most buses run from 6 AM until 9 PM, and the  busiest routes operate until midnight . There are also night buses between specific locations. You can find the bus routes  here .

When entering the bus, you  need to validate your ticket . Swipe your ticket in front of the machine until the light turns green. When you leave the bus, there is no need to swipe your card again. If you don’t have a prepaid ticket, you can  buy a travel pass from the driver . You can use the bus with the Lisboa Card for free, but you’ll have to swipe it to validate your journey. 

The bus to and from the airport

Aerobus  is the bus that will take you from Lisbon Airport to the centre. It  stops at many major stations , hotels and key parts of the city center. It´s the easiest way to travel by bus to your hotel. The buses will  depart from the Arrivals Hall in Terminal 1 .

Besides Aerobus, you can also take the Carris bus to town. Line 744, for example, will pass by bus stops like Marquês Pombal, and there are many buses to the nearby Oriente Station. Click  here  to read more about Lisbon Airport.

Lisbon airport Portugal

Lisbon Trams

The  tramway network consists of six lines  with a total length   of 31 kilometres. The famous yellow trams in Lisbon  started operating in 1873 , and some trams are very historical, but modern trams run in the city as well. The cable tram is perfect for conquering the steep slopes, and Tram 28 has become an actual phenomenon to ride!  The current network  is as follows:

  • 12: Praça da Figueira → Miradouro de Santa Luzia
  • 15: Praça da Figueira ↔ Belém ↔ Algés
  • 18: Cais do Sodré ↔ Cemitério da Ajuda
  • 24: Praça Luís de Camões ↔ Campolide
  • 25: Praça da Figueira ↔ Campo de Ourique (Prazeres)
  • 28: Praça Martim Moniz ↔ Graça ↔ Estrela ↔ Campo de Ourique (Prazeres)

The ferry in Lisbon

A  fun way of discovering Lisbon  is to take a ferry! Lisbon lies on the banks of  the river Tagus , and you have a magnificent view of the bridge  Ponte 25 de Abril  from the water. There are several ferry stations in Lisbon. From Cais do Sodré, you can take a ferry to  Cacilhas  to enjoy a romantic dinner at the river.

From  Terreiro do Paço , there are ferries to Seixal and Barreiro. Or take the ferry from Belém to  Porto Brandão  and Trafaria to enjoy the river views over the city centre! This public transport service offers some of the most scenic routes in Lisbon!

The ferry at Cacilhas public transport

Taxis in Lisbon

Lisbon taxis are widely available for those who want to skip public transportation altogether. There are ‘regular’ taxis covering every part of the city centre.  Bolt and Uber are great alternatives  and can often be a bit cheaper than the regular taxis in Lisbon. Download both apps before you travel and take advantage of the discounts they offer. 

How to get tickets for public transport in Lisbon

Most metro stations have  ticketing machines  where you can purchase tickets to use public transport in Lisbon. You can pay either cash or with your debit/credit card, and the devices will clearly state if it is one or the other. On buses and trams, you can buy your tickets when entering, but you can  save a few bucks  by getting your ticket beforehand. More on that later!

If you need help  buying your ticket , Metropolitano de Lisboa created  a helpful PDF  showing you how to buy a ticket at a vending machine.

Public transport Lisbon

Pay for single tickets with your debit/credit card

Since 2023, you can  swipe your debit or credit card when entering the Lisbon metro station. You swipe your bank card at the fare gates and swipe again when leaving the station. Do you have your payment details on your smartwatch or phone ? You can swipe those, too! So, you no longer need disposable tickets if you’re running to catch the metro. Single tickets for  contactless transportation cost € 1,80 . Visa, Mastercard, and V Pay are all accepted. 

Lisbon Public Transport ticket price

Single tickets.

A ticket from the ticket machines costs  € 1,80 for a single journey . This ticket is valid within Zone 1 (Lisbon) for 60 minutes following the first validation. You can make  unlimited journeys  on the Carris and Metro networks within that hour. Please be aware that it  can’t be used for consecutive trips  on the Metro!

Day tickets

Buying a day ticket makes sense if you use the public transportation system  more than a few times daily . This pass is  € 6,80 within Zone 1 for 24 hours . The time starts at  first validation  and can be used for unlimited journeys on Carris and Metro networks. For example, this is valid on all Lisbon buses and the metro line. What an easy way to see the entire city!

Extended tickets

When you also travel to  Cascais, Sintra or, for example, Cacilhas  on the same day, the  extended day pass for € 9,80  is the best value. This pass is also valid for  public transportation in Sintra , which is perfect if you want to see Palacio da Pena! The commuter trains are within the CP Urban Services (Comboios de Portugal) network. The  price of this day pass is € 10,80  (all tickets are Lisbon Public Transport prices 2024).

Zapping with the Navegante occasional card (formerly Viva Viagem)

When you  travel regularly but on different days , Zapping is your friend! You can top up your pre-paid Navegante occasional card with €3, €5, €10, €15, €20, €25, €30, €35 or €40. The price of a single journey  drops from €1.80 to €1,61 , and the cost is automatically deducted from your card balance. When you change transport operators, you’ll need to zap again! For example, you take the metro to Cais do Sodré and change onto the train to Belém. You then check out from the metro station and swipe again to enter the train.

The  Navegante occasional  is the perfect Zapping card for  occasional public transportation users,  and you can buy the Navegante occasional cards at the Ticket Vending Machines and Ticket Offices. The Navegante occasional card  costs only €0.50  and is perfect for your holiday in Lisbon as it can be reloaded unlimitedly! Everyone needs their own Navegante occasional card, as it  can’t be shared .

The yellow Navegante Lisboa card

When you enter the metro station, you can  swipe your card once . When you exit the station, you’ll  swipe your card again . Please note that some stations don’t have barriers, but you’ll still need to check in with your card. You can find check-in poles at the train station or on the platform.

Funiculars and the famous Tram 28​

Many visitors in Lisbon want to make a fantastic trip on the city trams or cable car, and some  tickets are a bit different . There are a few exemptions to the rules as these means of public transportation can come with a higher price. The good news is that they will  help you climb steep hills ! The not-so-good news is that the price is  €4,10 for a single journey ! When you have the Navegante occasional card, you can use zapping tickets to lower the cost. With the Lisboa Card, you enjoy free unlimited travel for 24, 28, or 72 hours.

Fenicular Lisbon

The tram services (especially Tram 28) and the funiculars are public transportation but are  so popular  that it looks more like a tourist attraction. You’ll see  endless queues of passengers  at the tram stops to get a seat on the crowded trams. The line can be well over one hour, and the chances of sitting down might be small! There is some standing room in the middle and the end of the tram.

Fenicular Lisbon

Tips for riding Tram 28

When you decide to take the tram,  please also be careful of pickpockets , as this is their hunting ground! Lastly, please  be considerate to commuters  as the local Lisboetas rely on public transportation to go to work and travel home. If you don’t want to wait at the tram stops but still enjoy a ride on a historic tram, booking  a tour with a guide  or buying a ticket for the  Hills Tramcar Tour  might be more suitable. Or  follow the tramline of Tram 28  on foot instead! You’ll have plenty of time to take images, and it’s a beautiful route in the city. 

The Santa Justa Lift

The same goes for the  Santa Justa Elevator . The line to enter Elevador de Santa Justa is usually long, as it´s one of the main tourist attractions in the city. You even pay a higher fee if you purchase your ticket on the spot. A  round-trip ticket with the elevator costs €6,00 , but a single ticket is also available.

The good news is that  a day pass will circumvent the higher fees , and for only €6.80, you’ll see the whole city on a budget! Do you have the  Lisboa Card ? Then, you can  ride to the top for free . You also have the option to walk around the elevator and reach the Santa Justa Elevator for free from Largo de Carmo (uphill!).

One more secret:

 Many elevators and escalators in the city are 100% free!  Click here  to read more and easily travel uphill in Lisbon at no extra cost.

Santa Justa lift public transport

Hop-on-hop-off bus in Lisbon

If you’re short on time and like to see as  many sights in a day  as possible, the hop-on-hop-off buses might be ideal for you. Prices start at  €22 for 24 hours , and different combi-tickets are available. Find out more about the  hop-on-hop-off tour buses  in this article.

The Lisboa Card

Last but not least, the  Lisboa Card . This is  THE travel card for Lisbon . Aside from unlimited rides on the Lisbon public transportation network, you have free  entrance to 35 museums, top monuments and attractions ! This way, you can enjoy the main tourist attractions in Lisbon for a great price.

There are three options:  24, 48 and 72-hour passes . The price for 24 hours is € 22,00. A ticket for 48 hours costs €37,00, and 72 hours costs €46,00. So you can use public transportation in Lisbon and visit places like  Jerónimos Monastery, the Belem Tower and Ajuda National Palace for free !

Did you get a little tired after visiting the sites? The Lisboa Card also  offers discounts to restaurants  and shops!

Buying the Lisboa Card

You can order your Lisboa Card below online before your trip. When you arrive in Lisbon, you simply pick up your Lisboa Card at a ticket office . There is one at the airport, and there are many within the city centre also. The card will only be activated when you swipe it the first time. So you can pick up your Lisboa Card today and start using it tomorrow, for example.

Frequent use of public transportation in Lisbon

There is one last tip for people who  stay in Lisbon longer . The N avegante Card  is perfect for frequent public transportation users and can be used for Zapping, and you can top the card up with  travel passes .

It takes about  ten days  to get your card, but there is an  express service if needed . The standard delivery is available from the stations Colégio Militar/Luz and Jardim Zoológico (blue line), Marquês de Pombal and Campo Grande (yellow line), Baixa-Chiado and Cais do Sodré (green line) and Oriente and Aeroporto (Red line). At Marquês de Pombal and Campo Grande, there is  a 1-day turnaround service  for express tickets.

Navegante Card Lisbon Public Transport

You’ll need to fill out an  application form  and provide an Identity Card, Passport or Residence Permit. You’ll also need an  original passport photo  in colour, as the navegante will have your picture on it! Once you have the card, you can  top it up with travel credit  and use it as a prepaid card! Standard delivery costs are €7, and express services are €12.

Navegante Lisboa  will let you travel within Zone 1, and for one month, you pay €30.  Navegante Metropolitano gives access to  Lisbon’s Metropolitan Area and costs €40 per month. Children, families and senior citizens pay a discounted price. You will be able to take unlimited rides for the month. They are currently working on a phone app to make charging the card easier.

Travelling to other cities

From Lisbon, it´s straightforward to travel to other cities. The  cheapest way to discover Portugal  is by bus. You can make a reservation with Flixbus or Busbud , which generally speaking offers the cheapest tickets.  Comboios de Portugal manages trains  in Portugal. You can pre-book tickets on their site or easily compare and book tickets with Omio . You can even  travel to other European cities  such as Madrid and Sevilla.

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Favourite Places to sleep in Lisbon

  • Modern Lisbon Apartments by SoulPlaces – loved by families
  • 54 Santa Catarina Apartments or 54 São Paulo – Exclusive Apartment Hotel – for those who like to sleep in style
  • TURIM Terreiro do Paço Hotel – central location downtown
  • Torel Palace – luxury stay with pool

Hotel

Overall the transportation in Lisbon is well organised and on time—Metro’s especially, run very often. Buses and trams might have more irregular times and might run late. Further west is no metro, but the city is well connected by bus and train.

You can pay cash (sometimes) with a debit/credit card or a prepaid card. With the Viva Viagem Card, you’ll save money.

Yes, you can!

No, but it is very affordable. Single tickets start from € 1,80, and a day pass is only € 6,80 (2024 prices).

Hopefully, this article was helpful and set you up for your long or short trip to Lisbon! Getting around is pretty straightforward, and you’ll find the map of the stops on your line on the buses and trams. Of course, there are also other means of transport, such as  taxis and bikes . Uber and Bolt are widely used, as well as regular taxis. Or book a fun bike  tour with Baja Bikes , for example! Besides that, Lisbon is a great city to explore on foot! Do  you have any tips to add ? Reply in the comments!

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Hi! I'm the founder and writer behind Discover Portugal. After travelling the world for over 25 years, I settled in Portugal in 2021. I work as a professional photographer and writer with over 10 years of experience. I write local guides about Lisbon (where I'm based) and the rest of Portugal to inspire you for your Portugal vacation.

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This is incredibly helpful. Public transportation is usually a little intimidating in a new place so it’s awesome to be prepared ahead of time. Saving this for later. Thanks!

Wow! This guide is incredibly helpful. I’m hoping to plan a trip to Lisbon next year. Saving this for then!

This is so helpful! I always want to take advantage of public transport when I travel (especially in Europe) but hesitate because I don’t know what it looks like beforehand. So this is perfect for when we get to Portugal!

Thank you for such a comprehensive guide. It would have come in handy when I visited Lisbon 12 years ago. But until next time! Planning on going there next year 😀

Wow this is a great guide! I’ll definitely save this for later as I’m planning a trip to Portugal soon =)

I didn’t quite make it to Lisbon, so I had no idea how complete their transit system was. I definitely would park the car and take transit while visiting.

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33+ Important Tips for Visiting Lisbon for the First Time

The secret is definitely out: visiting Lisbon, Portugal is an absolute delight!

While this sunny, colorful capital city may have been under the radar a decade or two ago, today it is deservedly popular with travelers near and far.

As beautiful as Lisbon is, though, there are definitely some quirks to keep in mind when visiting–which is why we’ve rounded up the best Lisbon travel tips to keep in mind as you plan your first trip to the “Queen of the Sea”.

As American ex-pats who have spent a year calling Lisbon home (and hosted many family and friends along the way), we have quite a bit of advice for traveling Lisbon well!

Here are our top tips for visiting Lisbon for the first time.

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Tips for Visiting Lisbon’s Top Attractions

Lisbon travel tips for getting around the city, tips for taking day trips from lisbon, tips for visiting lisbon’s restaurants + snack bars, other tips for your first trip to lisbon.

kate storm in a blue dress in the monastery of sao vicente, one of the best places in lisbon off the beaten path

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You don’t necessarily need to go into the Belém Tower.

As you’ve started planning your Lisbon travels, it’s practically guaranteed that you’ve come across photos of the famous Belém Tower along the way.

The tower is one of the most recognizable landmarks in Lisbon, a prime example of the Manueline architecture that the city is famous for, and is absolutely beautiful.

… but for travelers with only a short trip to Lisbon planned, there’s no reason to go inside.

While the exterior of the tower is definitely worth seeing (it’s gorgeous, free, and quick to visit), the interior is comparatively plain.

Getting to see the details of the tower up close is nice, but the rooms of the tower are empty, you can get equally stunning views from dozens of other viewpoints in Lisbon, and it is far too small to accommodate the number of visitors it gets each day.

If your visit goes as ours did, you’ll end up waiting in line to access each separate level of the tower–and none of them are really worth the wait.

kate storm in a red dress in front of the belem tower in sunny lisbon vs porto

Buy tickets in advance for the most popular attractions.

The top attractions in Lisbon, including the Jerónimos Monastery and Castelo de São Jorge , get extremely crowded, and it will make your life much easier to purchase tickets in advance!

This Lisbon travel tip goes for nearby Sintra, too, especially at the iconic Pena Palace and the dreamy Quinta da Regaleira.

We tend to book most of our tickets for Lisbon in advance through Get Your Guide or Tiqets , both of which are reputable and easy to use.

Shop tickets and tours for visiting Lisbon today!

cloisters of jeronimos monastery, one of the top attractions to see when visiting lisbon portugal

There’s no reason to wait in line for the Santa Justa Lift.

The striking Santa Justa Lift, designed and built by a student of Gustave Eiffel, is one of the most popular landmarks in the city.

Originally built as public transportation to connect Baixa to Chiado/Bairro Alto, today riding the lift is the definition of a tourist trap, drawing long lines at all hours of the day.

However, if you’re standing in the shady Largo di Carmo, facing the roofless church (which is absolutely worth visiting), you’ll notice a small street to the right that leads along the side of the church.

Follow it, and in less than a minute, you’ll find yourself at the top of the famous Santa Justa Lift!

You can walk out onto the lift for free at this point, and enjoy the exact same views that the visitors waiting in line down in Baixa are waiting for–but without cost or having to wait.

The view is beautiful, too, especially when standing out on the lift and facing Castelo de São Jorge.

view from santa justa lift, a beautiful view to see on a 3 days in lisbon itinerary

Lisbon’s hidden gems are truly worth the effort.

While the city’s top attractions definitely tend toward being very crowded today, there are hundreds of incredible things to do in Lisbon that draw a fraction of the visitors despite being well worth a visit.

A few of our favorites include the Monastery of São Vicente de Fora (beautiful azulejos and incredible views from the roof), the National Museum of the Azulejo (famous yet uncrowded as it’s a bit out of the way), the National Coach Museum , and the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum .

The sky is truly the limit when it comes to less-visited museums and monuments in Lisbon, though!

Other incredible options include the National Pantheon, the Ajuda Palace , and the garden of Quinta dos Azulejos.

You can read our guide to Lisbon’s secret spots here .

kate storm on the rooftop of the monastery of sao vicente de fora lisbon hidden gems

Don’t buy a Lisbon Card without planning your trip first.

Buying a Lisbon Card is a popular option for people visiting Lisbon for the first time, but we recommend not buying one until you plan your trip to Portugal in a bit more detail!

The biggest reason to buy the card has less to do with the attractions, and more to do with the ease of navigating Lisbon’s public transportation system.

With a Lisbon Card, you’ll be able to travel around with Lisbon’s buses, trams, metro, and trains (including the train to Sintra ) for one price.

This is definitely appealing, but how much actual cash value having a Lisbon Card is worth depends heavily on how much public transportation you plan to use (and whether you’re comfortable buying tickets in a more traditional way).

kate storm boarding a train to sintra from lisbon portugal

While the Lisbon attractions included with the card are certainly worth visiting, beyond the Jerónimos Monastery, most of them don’t typically feature on a first-timer’s Lisbon itinerary .

And, they’re not even all in Lisbon!

Alcobaça Monastery and Batalha Monastery, for example, are some of my favorite places in Portugal… and are located more than an hour outside the capital.

We’re certainly not saying that you shouldn’t buy the Lisbon Card –it can be a great fit for some travelers–but don’t assume it’s an obvious advantage, either.

Also, note that while you can purchase the card online, you’ll still have to pick up the physical card during your Lisbon travels before you can redeem it.

Check the Lisbon Card’s prices and inclusions now!

lisbon tram with tiled buildings to the right and cathedral behind it

Group your sightseeing by neighborhood.

Many of the Lisbon neighborhoods that travelers like to visit on their first trip to the city are quite spread out from each other.

This is especially true for Belém, which feels completely separate from Lisbon’s center despite being home to some of the city’s most popular attractions.

When planning a trip to Lisbon, be sure to note which attractions are near each other and plan your days based on geography.

For example, planning a day in Lisbon that includes visiting the Castelo de São Jorge, the Jerónimos Monastery, and the Carmo Convent back-to-back is a frustrating strategy.

Our recommended 3 day Lisbon itinerary conquers the city neighborhood by neighborhood, making it easier to see more with less time!

cafe in alfama lisbon with the wall of the cathedral in the background

… and start at the highest point.

Climbing steep hills is an unavoidable fact of life when visiting Lisbon, but you can give your knees a break by starting at the highest point in any given neighborhood!

A couple of destinations that make great starting points to head downhill from include the Miradouro da Graça, the Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcantara (one of our favorites in the city), and the Castelo de São Jorge.

kate storm overlooking a mirodouro in lisbon portugal

Don’t expect an interior when visiting Castelo de São Jorge.

Lisbon, and Portugal in general, is lousy with opulent palaces built and decorated to the hilt throughout the centuries… but the famous Castelo de São Jorge is not one of them.

Today, the castle is famous for its views and for the fact that you can stroll around the top of its ramparts, soaking in the views and imagining what once was as you do.

Though the hill that Castelo de São Jorge sits atop is incredibly important to the history of Portugal (to start with, the country was founded on this spot in 1143 when the Portuguese conquered the city from its Islamic rulers), the actual structure on the hill has been rebuilt many times.

That’s not to say that the castle isn’t worth visiting, but don’t expect details like throne rooms or furnishings here (there are, however, lots of peacocks).

kate storm and jeremy storm during winter in lisbon portugal standing on the walls of castelo de sao jorge

Picking a neighborhood and wandering is a great way to visit Lisbon.

While targeted sightseeing is a must if you want to experience the best things to do in Lisbon in a short amount of time, be sure to leave plenty of time in your schedule for wandering, too!

Lisbon’s many neighborhoods are a delight to explore on foot.

Beautiful areas like Alfama, Chiado, Bairro Alto, Belém , Cais do Sodré, and Baixa are lovely, and you’ll no doubt experience them when visiting Lisbon.

If you want to go a bit further afield to wander, though, consider also sampling Campo de Ourique (don’t miss the beautiful Prazeres Cemetery), Estrela (the Jardim da Estrela will forever be one of our favorite places in Lisbon, and the basilica is stunning too), Arroios, Príncipe Real, and Graça.

Campo de Ourique Food Market

A sailboat cruise on the Tagus is a great travel experience in Lisbon.

The views of Lisbon from the Tagus are wonderful, and there’s nothing quite like experiencing the city from the water.

Lisbon’s history and culture are deeply tied to the  Tejo  and to the wide open sea that lies beyond it, and relaxing on a sailboat is a fantastic addition to any visit to Lisbon.

Plus, it’s simply lots of fun, and more affordable than you might expect!

Most Tagus River cruises leave from Belém, and you can easily add a cruise to your time there.

Personally, we’re partial to sailboat cruises (as opposed to large tourist boats), and if you can arrange your Lisbon trip so that you can enjoy the Tagus at sunset, all the better.

Book your Lisbon sailboat cruise today!

view of tagus river from a sailboat when visiting lisbon portugal

Most Lisbon churches are free to visit, so be sure to step inside!

While the Lisbon Cathedral and the Carmo Convent (though that one is a museum rather than a working church today) have modest entry fees, virtually every other church in Lisbon is free and easy to enter.

That even includes the stunning Church of Santa Maria de Belém that is attached to the popular Jerónimos Monastery (which holds the tomb of Vasco da Gama, among others).

Some of my favorite churches in Lisbon to visit include the Church of São Domingos, the Church of São Roque (a must for anyone who enjoys over-the-top opulent churches), and St. Anthony’s Church (don’t miss the crypt).

The Lisbon Cathedral is a bit controversial among travelers: historically important and rebuilt several times, the interior is much plainer than many expect, especially considering it is one of the only churches in Lisbon to charge an entry fee.

It’s beautiful, but very different in style to most in the city–if you’re on the fence about it or short on time, you can skip it.

interior of church of sao domingos, one of the most unique churches lisbon in 3 days

Don’t expect to be able to walk everywhere.

While Lisbon’s various neighborhoods tend to be very walkable in their own right, the city as a whole is fairly dispersed.

You’ll need transportation other than your own feet to travel between many neighborhoods–and luckily, Lisbon has plenty of options!

Lisbon’s taxis are generally plentiful and very easy to use, trams of course are popular, and the metro goes to a fair number of places, too (including the airport, though taking a taxi into the city is faster).

group of taxis parked in front of lisbon santa apolonia train station

We’re not exaggerating about the hills.

You will absolutely get a workout when visiting Lisbon for the first time and sampling the city’s major sights!

Opt for very comfortable, sturdy shoes with a grip on them, and be prepared to work for your views.

If you’d like to avoid climbing many hills, structure your days carefully and budget for plenty of taxis (rates start at 3.50 and we regularly travel across the city for under 10 Euro).

Lisbon’s funiculars, Bica, Glória, and Lavra (the last being the least touristy) can also help out with the steep climbs in a few places.

gloria funicular in lisbon portugal painted yellow

The fastest way between Baixa and Chiado is through H&M.

Funiculars aren’t the only way to shave a climb off your route!

The multi-story H&M store on Rua do Carmo has a series of escalators that make for an excellent shortcut between the neighborhoods of Baixa and Chiado, each of which is home to some of the top things to do in Lisbon.

santa justa lift as seen from below in baixa when visiting lisbon 3 day itinerary

Tram 28 is not necessarily the best way to get around the city.

Long ago, someone wrote that riding Lisbon’s classic Tram 28 was a cheap, easy, and local way to see the best of the city.

This was undoubtedly great advice at the time, but it’s long outdated.

True, the Tram 28 route only costs 3 Euro (or is included with a Lisbon Card ), and trundles right past many of Lisbon’s top landmarks, including past the Praça do Comércio, through Alfama, right by top viewpoints like the Miradouro de Santa Luzia, and more.

On the other hand, it’s ridiculously crowded, the best views of the tram are actually from the outside, and it’s a bit of a magnet for pickpockets these days.

If you love trams, it may be worth riding for the experience–but if you just want to get across Lisbon, there are plenty of other ways to do so.

yellow tram passing throuh alfama, one of the best things to see on a lisbon itinerary

Taxis are the fastest way to get to the city center from the airport.

There’s a well-organized taxi stand right outside of the arrivals hall at the airport, and it’s the fastest way into the city.

Riding the metro is also doable and more budget-friendly, but it takes quite a bit longer.

Unlike some cities, there is no set fare for a taxi ride from the Lisbon Airport (technically named the Humberto Delgado Airport or Portela Airport) to the city center, however, the fare should run roughly 15 to 20 Euro.

line for taxi stand at lisbon airport arrivals, one of the best lisbon travel tips is that taxis are the easiest way into the city

Download FreeNow for calling taxis.

FreeNow isn’t specific to Lisbon, but we use it here all the time!

Think of this app as Uber for official taxi rides.

It’s popular in many cities across Europe and comes in very handy both in Portugal and beyond.

taxis driving through rossio square during jacaranda season during spring in lisbon portugal

Sintra is wonderful, but it’s not Lisbon’s only day trip option.

When you’re planning a trip to Lisbon, you’ll no doubt hear about a thousand times that you have to take a day trip to Sintra.

Located less than an hour outside of Lisbon, Sintra is a beautiful place, filled with interesting and sometimes downright bizarre palaces.

Once a retreat for wealthy people ranging from Portuguese royalty to British aristocrats to an American socialite, Sintra’s palaces are well worth visiting.

… but they’re also very crowded, and far from the only day trip worth taking from Lisbon!

Honestly, I believe that Lisbon has better day trip options than the vast majority of European cities because there is simply so much variety!

Pena Palace in Sintra, an excellent day trip from Lisbon Portugal

Want a beach town? Go to Cascais.

A stunning hike along the coast? Arrabida Nature Park.

The most beautiful monasteries you’ve ever seen? Alcobaça Monastery, Batalha Monastery, and Tomar’s Convent of Christ are waiting.

A medieval town to explore? Go walk the walls of Óbidos .

I could keep going, but essentially, don’t default to Sintra when planning a trip to Lisbon if another kind of day trip appeals to you more.

kate storm walking along the castle walls, one of the best things to do in obidos portugal

Lisbon has more than one train station, so double-check which one you need.

If you’re planning to travel away from Lisbon by train, whether on a day trip or further afield, be sure to check which station you need to leave from!

For example, most trains running from Lisbon to Porto leave from Santa Apolónia Station, while trains to Sintra leave from Rossio Station and trains to Cascais leave from the Cais do Sodre Station.

None of these stations are particularly far from each other, but you don’t want to end up heading to the wrong one during your Lisbon travels!

jeremy storm at cais do sodre train station in lisbon portugal

Trains are excellent, but taxis are often faster.

For many of Lisbon’s nearby day trips, a great compromise–especially when traveling with a group–between the comfortable but often slower trains versus the hassle of parking a rental car can be to take taxis.

You’ll spend a bit more, but you’ll often save quite a bit of time, too!

For nearby spots like Cascais and Sintra, we’ll often take the train on the way to our destination, and then call a taxi or Uber to go home when we’re ready.

kate overlooking the sea in cascais, a fun stop during 10 days in portugal itinerary

Not all trains have a/c, and they often trap heat.

… and when the trains do have a/c, it isn’t necessarily strong enough to cool the trains down to a comfortable temperature!

Lisbon tends to have fairly mild weather, so this isn’t often a problem, but if you happen to be visiting during a heat spell in the summer, keep it in mind when planning day trips.

On hot, sunny days, it can be hotter inside a running train than it is outside.

colorful buildings with iron balconies in graca lisbon, as seen when traveling portugal

Don’t plan a day trip to Porto.

We know that trying to decide whether to visit Lisbon or Porto is a hard choice–and we love them both.

Resist the temptation to plan a day trip between them, though!

Even on a high-speed train, the 2 cities are simply too far apart to be good day trips from each other, especially because there are dozens of other worthy places to visit within an hour or 2 of each city.

(That being said, we have received enough questions about this that we have put together a guide on how to take a day trip to Porto from Lisbon for travelers who are determined to go!)

cloister of porto cathedral in porto portugal

There aren’t beaches within walking distance of Lisbon’s center, but you can reach them.

Despite being located temptingly close to the water, there aren’t beaches in Lisbon’s city center (technically there’s a tiny patch of sand in front of Praça do Comércio at low tide, but it doesn’t really qualify as a beach).

You can reach the many beautiful beaches near Lisbon fairly easily, though!

Costa da Caparica, Estoril, Sintra, and Cascais all have wonderful beaches to choose from.

For a large, tried and true beach very close to Lisbon, Praia de Carcavelos is a local favorite.

kate storm in cascais portugal on a day trip from lisbon

A food tour is absolutely worth the effort when visiting Lisbon.

We’re big proponents of food tours around the world: combining traditional local food with a chance to take a walking tour of a city is a fantastic way to get acquainted with a new place!

We’ve taken a few Lisbon food tours over the years, all wonderful, but on your first trip to Lisbon, there’s none that I recommend more highly than  this food and wine tour .

With a convenient starting point that is very close to the Church of São Domingos,  this food tour  is filling, delicious, and informative.

Best of all, it focuses primarily on introducing you to classic Lisbon cuisine, which will help you with ordering in restaurants for the rest of your time in Portugal.

Perhaps the biggest endorsement we can offer is that we have returned to several of the included establishments since, including bringing our friends and family to some of them when they visit Lisbon!

Book your Lisbon food tour  today!

bifana sandwich on a white plate in front of azulejos in portugal

Don’t eat a francesinha in Lisbon if you’re also visiting Porto.

There’s probably no more (in)famous Portuguese sandwich than the francesinha, which is essentially what happens when you take a croque-monseiur and ask “you know, how can we make this dramatically more unhealthy?”

Bread, ham, sausage, steak, more sausage, cheese, more bread, all smothered in a tomato and beer sauce: these are the general ingredients behind the francesinha.

The sandwich is generally served with fries and sometimes topped with a fried egg–and yes, it’s quite gluttonous.

Is it worth trying when in Portugal? Sure, once in a very long while.

If you’re also heading to Porto, though, skip the francesinha while in Lisbon.

While you can find them on menus here, the sandwich was invented and is much more common in Porto–you’ll find plenty of delicious options up there!

francesinha served in portugal with other food in the background

Be cautious with port (and ginjinha ).

Port is delicious, well worth sampling while in Portugal, and very strong.

At 20% alcohol (as opposed to around 12% on standard wine drunk in the USA), it is very easy to overindulge in port’s sweet taste without realizing it, even if you’re used to drinking.

Keep an eye out as you indulge in Portugal!

This goes for ginjinha , too (around 18% alcohol content), but as ginjinha is served in tiny cups and is treated more like a spirit, it’s not quite as easy to overdo as port is.

several glasses on port on a table during a port tasting in porto vs lisbon portugal

The key to appreciating pastéis de nata is eating them all.

More or less every bakery in Portugal has its own taking on the iconic pastel de nata , and trying a wide variety is a must when visiting Lisbon!

Some of the most popular bakeries include Pastelaria Santo António, Manteigaria, Confeitaria Nacional, Fábrica da Nata, and of course, the iconic and original Pastéis de Belém.

Everyone has their own favorites, and they can change from day to day, but you won’t go wrong with a pastel de nata (or 2, who’s counting?) from any of these spots.

Don’t forget to sprinkle the top with cinnamon and/or powdered sugar at least once!

Everyone has their own opinion on the sprinkling, too, but during your first trip to Lisbon, we’d recommend trying a bite each way.

person arranging pasteis de nata on a tray, one of the best things to buy in portugal

… but at Pastéis de Belém in particular, consider getting a table.

The iconic Pastéis de Belém is known for its extremely long lines, but here’s the thing: the line for table service is generally much shorter than the one for takeaway orders!

And, as a bonus, it’s more fun to eat in the dining room!

The interior is spacious, allows you to order a drink, and the building itself is also fun to walk through (you may even catch a glimpse of people hard at work in the kitchen cooking up an endless number of pastéis de nata ).

Alternatively, if you are visiting Lisbon for a longer period of time and aren’t squeezing lots of attractions into each day, consider heading to Pastéis de Belém on Mondays, when the nearby Jerónimos Monastery is closed and therefore the Belém neighborhood as a whole is much quieter.

We once waited less than 5 minutes for a box of pastéis de nata to takeaway when visiting on a Monday!

flatlay of pasteis de nata and coffee at pasteis de belem lisbon portugal

Make reservations for dinner.

When it comes to dinner, Lisbon is a city that loves its reservations.

If you have your eye on eating in a particular place, be sure to make a reservation in advance!

Generally, reserving a table the day before or even during lunch service the day that you plan to eat dinner there is fine.

However, if you have somewhere particularly popular in mind or if you’re heading out on a weekend, consider booking a bit further in advance.

Fish Egg Sacs Salad: Taste of Lisboa

… and don’t plan to eat early.

People in Lisbon don’t eat as late as, say, those in Madrid , but they still tend toward eating on the late side!

Most restaurants open for dinner around 7:00 PM or 7:30 PM, and they won’t really start to fill up until after 8:00 PM.

back garden of atalho real restaurant principe real with a fountain in the foreground

Bring very sturdy shoes.

Not only does walking in Lisbon require climbing lots of hills, but it’s also a bit hard on your feet in other ways.

The distinctive Portuguese pavement (or  calçada portuguesa ) that you’ll see throughout the city offers its challenges: these walkways are both beautiful and a bit of a hazard in the rain.

Here’s the thing… they’re  incredibly  slippery when wet, especially if they happen to have fallen leaves sitting on them.

Watch your step, especially on hills, and opt for shoes with some grip on them!

rossio square as seen when visiting lisbon portugal with calcada portuguesa in the foreground

When it doubt, take a ticket.

In Portugal, it’s very common to use a ticket-based system rather than a traditional line/queue in order to serve customers.

If you see several people standing around in a shop, look around for a ticket machine: that’s how you wait your turn.

You’ll see this everywhere from train stations to butcher shops to banks when visiting Lisbon, Portugal.

Don’t stay in Bairro Alto or Cais do Sodré unless you’re looking for nightlife.

Bairro Alto and Cais do Sodré are popular, centrally located neighborhoods with plenty of hotels and hostels… and they’re also the center of much of Lisbon’s nightlife.

If your value peace and quiet after dark, these are not the right neighborhoods for you to stay in!

pink street in lisbon portugal with umbrellas hanging overhead

Make note of whether your hotel has air conditioning and/or heat.

Lisbon’s typically mild climate means that not all hotels (especially budget hotels) have air conditioning or heat–but you may want it!

That’s not solely because of temperature control, either.

For example, Lisbon struggles with dampness, mildew, and mold in many of its buildings over the winter months.

It’s not a huge problem for visitors, but if you’re concerned about dampness in your room or you have allergies, it’s best to keep it in mind when deciding where to stay in Lisbon.

2 yellow trams passing each other on a cobbled street as seen when visiting lisbon portugal

Learn a few Portuguese phrases before visiting Lisbon.

While you’ll find plenty of English speakers in the city, it’s still a good idea to learn a few Portuguese phrases before your trip to Lisbon!

Not only is it polite, but it can also be helpful (in our experience, taxi drivers, for example, rarely speak English in Lisbon).

A simple por favor (please) and obrigado/obrigada (thank you from a male speaker/thank you from a female speaker) can go a long way when visiting Lisbon!

4 photos of attractions to see when visiting lisbon, black and red text reads "33 best travel tips lisbon portugal"

About Kate Storm

Image of the author, Kate Storm

In May 2016, I left my suburban life in the USA and became a full-time traveler. Since then, I have visited 50+ countries on 5 continents and lived in Portugal, developing a special love of traveling in Europe (especially Italy) along the way. Today, along with my husband Jeremy and dog Ranger, I’m working toward my eventual goal of splitting my life between Europe and the USA.

8 thoughts on “33+ Important Tips for Visiting Lisbon for the First Time”

Nicely done, I appreciate you have some uniques tips here compared to other blogs (the one about being careful on the Portugese pavement was very helpful). Thanks!

Thanks, Justin! Hope you have a great time in Lisbon. 🙂

One of the best blogs out there. Thank you for the wealth of information.

That’s great to hear, thank you! Hope you have a great time in Lisbon 🙂

What a wonderful source of information — thank you! My girlfriend and I are planning a trip to Lisbon in March. It’s our first time there and we’re wondering what part of the city is best for our accommodation. We plan to do lots of walking and would like to be pretty central. I spotted something interesting in the old part of the city and wonder if that might be a reasonable location. Any advice would be SO appreciated!

Thanks so much, Susanna!

As far as where to stay, there are lots of good options. We go over the neighborhoods in a bit more detail on the “where to stay” section of our itinerary posts: https://www.ourescapeclause.com/3-days-in-lisbon-itinerary/

Short answer: Baixa is by far the most accessible (central, lots of transport options, easy to get around), but it is also the most unapologetically touristy area. Alfama, the more traditional old town, is beautiful and central but not quite as convenient transport-wise due to the steep hills. Chiado is great if you want something close but not *too* close to the action, and Bairro Alto is best if you’re planning to join in on the nightlife (ie, don’t mind noise).

Hope you guys have a wonderful trip!

Thank you so much for all your helpful articles about Lisbon! By the way, do you know if we can get a bus from Oriente to Fatima? Since we’re going on a holiday, how do we book tickets in advance? Thank you!

As far as I know, buses to Fatima leave from the Sete Rios train station, so you’ll first need to travel from Oriente to Sete Rios before hopping on the bus.

You can book bus tickets in advance here: http://www.rede-expressos.pt (this is the Rede Expressos bus company website, which has an English version).

Hope you have a wonderful trip!

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Lisbon Travel Guide

When it comes to Lisbon, it's safe to say the secret's out. The coastal capital sees 4.5 million annual visitors, most of whom flock to the city for its fado music, historic ruins, winding old town, trams, not to mention those pasteis de nata. And that's not all: More new hotels and restaurants are on the way, and the city's architectural energy is drawing a new creative class, which means that soon—hard as it may be to believe—there will be even more reasons to visit. What are you waiting for?

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travel network lisbon

The Lisbon Tram Network, More Than Just Tram 28

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Lisbon tram

Oh, the famous yellow Lisbon tram. The picture is imprinted in our minds. How charming is the image of the old tram, passing by the Lisbon Cathedral. However, the Lisbon tram is more than just a tourist attraction. It is an important part of the city’s public transport network since it can reach the areas that the metro can’t. Read further and learn more about the city’s most emblematic vehicle, the Lisbon tram.

  • History of Lisbon trams

The history of Lisbon trams dates back to the 19th century. The very first tramway was a horsecar line and it opened to the public on 17th November 1873. 28 years later, in 1901, the first electric tramway entered service. It didn’t take long to abandon the horsecars. Until the end of the following year, all the tramways were powered by electricity instead of being horse-drawn. The golden age of Lisbon trams lasted until 1959. That year the city had the most tram lines in its history. There were 27 tram lines and six of them operated as a circle line.

tram goes down the hill

In the following years, the metro system and the expanded bus network slowly diminished the trams’ domination. Nowadays there are only six lines left, and all of them are in the southern and western parts of the city.

  • What are the different tram lines and their routes?

There are two kinds of Lisbon trams. The most famous are the old ones which are called “Remodelado”. They run through the narrow streets and go up and down in the downtown’s hills, just like Tram 28, Lisbon’s most emblematic vehicle. This route is very popular among tourists since it passes by most of the important sightseeing spots. The other trams are different from the “Remodelado”. They are modern Siemens trams, called “Articulado”. They only operate in the flat parts of the city, for example, Tram 15 between Praça da Figueira and Belém.

Tram network map

Currently the following six tram lines operate in Lisbon:

  • 12 – Praça da Figueira → Miradouro de Santa Luzia circular route
  • 15 – Praça da Figueira ↔ Belém ↔ Algés
  • 18 – Cais do Sodré ↔ Cemitério da Ajuda
  • 24 – Praça Luís de Camões ↔ Campolide
  • 25 – Rua Alfândega ↔ Campo de Ourique (Prazeres)
  • 28 – Praça Martim Moniz ↔ Graça ↔ Estrela ↔ Campo de Ourique (Prazeres)

You can click here to find out their routes.

  • How much do the Lisbon tram tickets cost?

A ticket for one ride on a Lisbon tram costs €3 if you buy it on board. However, that is far from the cheapest option. You should purchase a reusable Viva Viagem card at a metro station and charge it with money. That way a one-way ticket costs €1.50. Charging with Zapping is an even cheaper solution. You can put on your card €3, €5, €10 or more. That way a ticket costs only €1.35. Since the Lisbon tram network is operated by the same company, called Carris, you can use the same card and tickets on the metro and buses. The best part is that those tickets are valid for an hour, not only for one journey. So if you want to hop off a Lisbon tram, you can just hop on again within an hour without paying for another ticket.

  • Are there special discounts?

There are no special discounts on the Lisbon trams, but there are some clever solutions like the above mentioned Carris card and the Zapping option. Make sure you go to a metro station and get the card before you board a Lisbon tram! There is also another option – the Lisbon Card. It allows you to use public transport and enter several museums for free. For more information about the Lisbon Card, click here .

  • Daily, weekly and monthly passes

Buying a pass might be worth it if you use public transport frequently. Even if you spend just a few days, a week or a whole month in Lisbon. Let’s see how much they cost.  

Lisbon public transport ticket prices

Daily passes

There are three different daily passes for public transport in Lisbon. For €6.40 you can use any Lisbon tram, bus or metro line for 24 hours. For €9.50 the ferry to Cacilhas is also included. You should buy this pass if you want to cross the Tejo and visit the other side of the river. The last one costs €10.55 and it includes the trams, buses, the metro and the CP trains inside Lisbon.

Weekly passes

There are no weekly passes for Lisbon’s transport. The good news is that it is not necessary to buy one. There might be some days during your holiday when you need a daily pass, but otherwise, you can just walk around the city. If you are staying longer and need to use public transport daily, we recommend that you purchase a monthly pass.

Monthly passes

For a monthly pass, you need to order a plastic card with your picture. It is called Cartão Lisboa Viva and you can purchase it at the biggest metro stations. The card costs €8 if they mail it to your address, but if you want it on the spot it is €12. Once you have the card, you can charge it at metro stations. A monthly pass costs €30. For kids under 12, it is free. For a youngster under 23, it costs €22.50 and for seniors over 65, it is €20.

Tram timetables

Do you want to know the timetable for the famous Lisbon trams? Then go to the Carris website and select your line. Here you can find the timetables for all the lines.

tram in Lisbon

What time do they start and stop running?

Different lines have their own schedules with different start and end times, although most of them start running at around 6 am and stop between 8 and 9 pm. You can look for the timetable under the link above or download the Carris app for live information. For the iOS version click here , the Android version is right here .

  • The best times to go on a tram journey in order to avoid the rush hour

The most popular Lisbon tram, Tram 28, is almost always packed with tourists. To avoid the crowd and get a place to sit, follow our instructions! First of all, you have to avoid the rush hour, which means almost all day, except in the early morning and at night time. For example, if you visit during the summer, taking the tram at around 8 pm is a good solution. It’s still bright outside but most tourists will already be done with sightseeing by then. The other trick is to take the Lisbon tram at one of the terminus points and start your journey at Campo de Ourique or Martim Moniz. That way you might be lucky and get a window seat.

  • Beware of pickpockets!

A crowded tram full of tourists is a real pickpocket paradise. You never know who will go for your wallet or camera. Pickpockets can be men or women of all ages, so it’s better to be attentive throughout the whole journey. Keep your backpack in front of you and hang your camera in your neck instead of on your shoulder!

  • What is the most famous tram in Lisbon?

You might have already worked out that the most famous Lisbon tram is Tram 28. It is super popular with tourists because it crosses through the most beautiful parts of downtown, from Campo de Ourique to Martim Moniz. It goes through the Estrela district, Baixa and also the unmissable Alfama .

tram in Alfama

For a detailed article about Tram 28, click here .

  • Pros and cons of taking the tram

The old remodeled trams have their special atmosphere and they can drive you through the places where you can’t go by bus or metro. Those parts are the most picturesque areas in Lisbon. However, you have to deal with the crowd and take care of your belongings, since you can become a target of pickpockets.

  • Should you go on a tram journey

The Lisbon trams are definitely a must-do if you come to visit the city. Just choose the right time to take it and enjoy the views from the open windows. The old vehicles are one of the most emblematic symbols of Lisbon and they provide a great experience. Sometimes you might feel as though you were on a roller coaster but its imperfection makes it an unforgettable memory.

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Lisbon tram guide - updated for 2024

Lisbon's trams are an integral part of the public transport network, and cover many of the areas of the city where there is no access to the metro.

There are two distinct types of trams, the historic "Remodelado" trams or the modern Siemens "Articulado" trams.

The Remodelado trams are the quaint yellow trams that rattle and screech through the narrow streets of Lisbon. The most scenic route is the E28, which passes through much of the historic centre, and is often a highlight of the city.

tram lisbon Remodelado

The distinctive yellow Remodelado trams

The Articulado trams provide a higher passenger capacity but are confined to the flat sections of the city, and only operate along the E15, which connects central Lisbon to the Belem district. Belem is a popular tourist district, with many outstanding attractions and historical monuments, and the E15 tram is the best method to travel to Belem.

Along with the main public transport routes, there is a selection of tourist tram tours, but these are significantly more expensive. This article will provide an introduction to Lisbon's tram network, including details of fares, timetables and other useful tourist information. Related articles: The Belem district – The Alfama district – Top 10 Lisbon

15 tram Lisbon

The number 15 tram in Belem

Overview of Lisbon’s trams

The following is a summary of each of the tram routes in Lisbon and why you would want to ride them. At the end of this section is a map which shows the tram routes. E28 – Martim Moniz to Campo Ourique (Prazeres) This is the classic tram route through the Alfama, Baixa and Chiado districts, and connects the eastern and western sides of central Lisbon. The route passes through many of the historic areas of Lisbon, and you will want to ride this route during your stay in Lisbon. Unfortunately, the 28 tram gets very busy during the day and is best ridden early in the day. Related article: E28 tram guide

E15 - Praça Figueira to Algés The number 15 tram route connects central Lisbon (Baixa district) to the Belem district, and passes the Lxfactory and the Santo Amaro Docks. This is the best way for you to travel from central Lisbon to Belem. Related article: E15 tram guide . Warning: Highly skilled pickpockets operate along this route, always be careful with valuables

Praça do Comércio tram

The yellow of the E15 trams and the yellows of the Praça do Comércio

tram lisbon Remodelado trams

The number 28 tram outside of the Se cathedral is the classic photo of Lisbon

E12 - Martim Moniz to Martim Moniz (Alfama loop) The number E12 tram is a one-directional loop (clockwise) through the Baixa, Mouraria and Alfama districts. The E 12 follows the scenic section of the E28 route as is passes through the Alfama district and is a good alternative to the E28. Related article: E12 guide

E24 - Praça Luis Camões to Campolide Connects the Chiado district with the Príncipe Real district. This route is useful if you wish to explore Príncipe Real, as you can be dropped off at the northern end (near Rato metro) and then walk southernly through Príncipe Real. This is also the quietest route that uses the Remodelado trams. Related article: E24 tram

E 18 - Cais do Sodré to Belem This route follows the 15E route and provides extra capacity for the busiest section, between Cais do Sodré to Belem. This route used to connect Cais do Sodré to the Ajuda Palace, but extended repair work means the route has been permanently altered. To travel to the Ajuda Palace catch the E18 bus.

E25 - Martim Moniz to Campo Ourique (Prazeres) Connects the Baixa district to Estrela, and passes through the Lapa district and Cais do Sodré. This is the route least used by visitors, but provides an alternative route to Estrela and passes through some of the most affluent neighbourhoods of Lisbon.

Below is an interactive map which displays the tram routes of Lisbon.

Key: Green - E28 , Blue - E15 , Purple - E12 , Yellow - E24 , Grey- E25

Insight: The Lisbon tram routes are given a number with a proceeding E which stands for “eléctrico”.

28 tram Sao Bento district

The number 28 tram as it wizzes through the Sao Bento district

Basílica da Estrela

The tram stops outside of the Basílica da Estrela

Insider Tip: The E28 is one of the best tours of Lisbon but is standing room only between 10am-6pm. The best way to get a seat is to board the tram at either of the departure locations at Martim Moniz to Campo Ourique.

Lisbon tram fares and tickets

All of Lisbon’s trams and buses are operated by Carris and the fare system covers all tram routes.

A single tram ticket purchased onboard the tram costs €3.00. On the Articulado trams, tickets are purchased from the on-board ticket machines while on the older Remodelado they are bought from the driver.

Purchasing a ticket on the tram is more difficult than it sounds, both types of trams are always very crowded, and on the Articulado tram, the ticket machine needs exact change.

A much better option is to purchase the 24-hour public transport ticket, which costs €6.80 and includes all trams, metro and buses in Lisbon. The only inconvenience is that the 24-hour ticket can only be purchased from metro stations. The ticket is charged to the Navegante reusable card, which costs €0.50 for the initial purchase of the card. With this ticket remember to validate it when entering the tram.

Insider Tip: For tourists, this 24-hour ticket is exceptional value, as it includes the Elevador da Glória (€3.80), Elevador de Santa Justa (€5.30) and all of Lisbon’s trams - a whole day of sightseeing for just €6.80!

Elevador da Bica

Elevador da Bica is sadly, frequently covered in graffiti

Tram timetables for Lisbon

The tram is an important part of Lisbon’s public transport network and the operational hours reflect the importance of each route. For the 15E and 28E, the services start early in the day (7am) and continue late into the night (11pm) with at least four hourly departures.

The 12E continues until 8pm, while the E18 routes finishes after the evening rush hours and does not run on Sundays. The 25E is the most limited, as it does not even operate at the weekends… The exact timetables can be seen on the Carris website: http://www.carris.pt/

Even if you know the exact times, the trams have regular delays due to traffic, staffing issues or badly parked cars. At all of the major tram stops, there are digital information boards which accurately display the departure time of the next tram. These boards are much more useful than the timetables.

Tourist insight: The unspoken rule of Lisbon’s trams (the older Remodelado style) and buses is that you board at the front by the driver and exit to the rear. If you try to exit a bus or tram at the front, expect disapproving stares from older Portuguese

Lisbon tram number 28

The Lisbon tram number 28, at Portas do Sol in Alfama

Pickpockets on the trams

It is very sad that a whole section must be dedicated to pickpockets who plague the popular tourist tram routes. The pickpockets tend to target very crowded trams such as the 15E and 28E and tend to steal from people close to the exits. These pickpockets are only ever opportunists (never aggressive or violent) and only target tourists who fail to use common sense or are simply being careless.

Always wear bags or backpacks on your front, never leave expensive cameras hanging from shoulders (cords can be cut) and always place valuables in bags. The pickpockets are as equally likely to be women as men…

tourist trams lisbon

The tourist trams provide a more relaxing but expensive means to see the city

Why does Lisbon still use the Remodelado trams?

No other city in Europe employs such old trams as the Remodelado trams, which originally date from the 1930s. The reason why they still operate in Lisbon is that the streets are too tight for longer trams, and too undulating for multiple bogie vehicles.

Most normal tram routes have shallow or no inclines, with wide turns and plenty of space, but not in Alfama! The tram tracks in Alfama are the world's steepest, while the turning circle of the single carriage only just miss the edges of the ancient overhanging buildings.

When the entire tram network was upgraded in the 1990s, only the 15E route could be switched to modern trams. As part of the project, it was deemed more appropriate to upgrade the historic trams with new engines, brakes and electronics; hence the trams were re-modelled (Portuguese Remodelado).

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Lisbon Trams

Tourist guide.

Trams in Alfama, Lisbon

Tram 28 in Alfama, on its way up the hill towards the neighborhood of Graça

R iding Lisbon's trams can either be a charming or a nerve-wracking experience. That depends on whether you get a seat or have to stand, packed like a sardine in a can. It is also not the best form of transportation when you're in a hurry, as double-parked cars often slow down the journey. Still, no visit to Lisbon is complete without a ride on these old marvels, which remain the only way to navigate the narrow streets of the hilly districts. They've been in operation since 1901, and all of them (except modern tram 15) still have their original wood paneling. They start their day between 6am and 7am, and most continue until late at night. At major stops, there are digital information boards indicating how much time is left until the next tram. It’s important to remember that on the old trams, passengers board through the front door (by the driver), while on the modern tram 15, any door may be used. Passengers with the prepaid cards, have to validate them by scanning them on the machine behind the driver. These are the six tram routes in Lisbon:

Eléctrico 12 tram, Lisbon

A circular route starting in Martim Moniz, up to Miradouro das Portas do Sol , passing by the cathedral and Praça da Figueira (stop pictured above), before returning to Martim Moniz.

See the tram 12 guide .

Tram 15 in Praça da Figueira, downtown Lisbon

From Praça da Figueira (stop pictured above) it goes to Praça do Comércio and continues down the waterfront, passing by Cais do Sodré , Avenida 24 de Julho, and Belém . It’s the most popular way to go from central Lisbon to Belém (although the train that departs from Cais do Sodré is really faster, more comfortable and more recommended).

See the tram 15 guide .

Eléctrico 18 tram, Lisbon

From the stop next to Cais do Sodré train station (pictured above), it goes down the waterfront, past Avenida 24 de Julho, to Ajuda, on the hill above Belém . It departs three times per hour (roughly every 22 minutes), and takes about 25 minutes to reach the stop by Ajuda Palace . Note that it does not operate on Sundays or in August.

Eléctrico 24 tram, Lisbon

From Praça Luís de Camões in Chiado , it goes up the hill towards São Roque Church and the São Pedro de Alcântara viewpoint in Bairro Alto and Príncipe Real , and ends a short walk from the Amoreiras shopping mall .

See the tram 24 guide .

Eléctrico 25 tram, Lisbon

Operating only on weekdays, it departs from Praça da Figueira (every 15 to 20 minutes), passes by Praça do Comércio , goes through Santos (down the street from the Ancient Art Museum ), up to Basílica da Estrela and Campo de Ourique . It takes about a half hour to complete its journey.

Tram 28 in Alfama, Lisbon

This unofficial tourist line has the most picturesque route. It goes through the narrow streets of Alfama , past the cathedral , up to Chiado and Basílica da Estrela . With the Lisboa Card you can always hop on and off at the various stops for free. However, nowadays it is just way too crowded to make it a comfortable sightseeing experience.

See the tram 28 guide .

Tram Tickets and Prices

Inside a Lisbon tram

Tram tickets are 3 euros for single journeys, and are bought directly from the driver as you enter (except in the case of the modern tram 15, where you buy them from a machine inside). Yes, it’s a little expensive, but most locals use their monthly passes and many tourists use the tourist pass (the Lisboa Card), so the price is meant to discourage those without passes from riding — a lot of time used to be wasted in the buying of tickets, preventing the trams from completing their journeys on time. If you plan to take the trams (or any public transportation in Lisbon), save time and money by getting the Lisboa Card . This card also has the major advantage of offering free or reduced admission to most of the city’s attractions. Alternatively, there’s the 24-hour public transportation card (the “Viva Viagem”), which can be bought at any metro station. The card costs €0.50, and the 24-hour fare charged on it is €6.45. That includes rides on the trams, metro, funiculars, and buses within Lisbon.

Pickpockets on the trams

Pickpocketing warning in a Lisbon tram

The crowded trams are the perfect targets of pickpockets. Trams 28 and 15 have the most reported cases, but the usual precautions and common sense should be applied in any form of transportation in any tourist destination. It should be noted that most pickpockets are from Eastern Europe, and often dress like tourists (even carrying maps and cameras), so there’s no way you can spot one. Victims are usually the more careless tourists -- it’s recommended that if you stand on the trams, wear your backpack in the front, place your wallet in a front pocket and cover it with your hand. Pickpocketing is never a violent act -- victims often just notice their valuables are gone minutes after the theft. To report such an occurrence, head to the tourist police in Praça dos Restauradores .

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Lisbon Tram

Lisbon Tram

The Lisbon trams are one of the best ways to move around Lisbon, as well as being one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city.

The trams in Lisbon  are, not only one of  the most useful means of transport  to get around the city, but also  one of the city ’ s most popular tourist attractions.

Portugal’s capital currently has five different routes and 58 trams , of which 40 are vintage streetcars . The heritage trams are small, nostalgic and an emblematic symbol of Lisbon , making for great photos.

The price of the ticket for the Lisbon tramway on board is € 3 ( US$ 3.30), while if you use the 7 Colinas Card , the price is € 1.50 ( US$ 1.60) per trip.

Of the five routes, we recommend two:

Nostalgic Tram nº 28

The nostalgic tram 28 is an institution in itself. This wooden tram will transport you to another era . Its horn rings constantly to warn absent-minded pedestrians to move out of the way when it runs past the city’s long and narrow streets.

The tram links São Jorge Castle and Bairro Alto , crossing various picturesque neighbourhoods for 6.2 miles (10 km), including Graça, Mouraria, Alfama, Baixa , Chiado, Madragoa and Bairro Alto . Thousands of tourists take this tram every day.

The tram 15 is the most frequently used tram in Lisbon because it connects the city centre and Belém .

This tram is not romantic . It is useful, modern and is always jam-packed with people , mostly tourists. If you take tram 15, keep an eye on your belongings as there are pickpockets.

The tram 15 departs from “Cais de Sodré” station, a large interchange station near Praça do Comércio.

Tram routes map

Check out Lisbon’s several bus, tram and metro routes, among others in the following link . It can be a little tricky to understand.

Nostalgic Tram no. 28

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Lisbon Travel Guide

The Lisbon transport network works smoothly, although at times it could benefit from a higher frequency of service, it is relatively punctual. The major means of transport in Lisbon are:

Lisbon buses are a less used option than the metro by tourists, but they are essential for certain routes in Lisbon.

travel network lisbon

How to Ride the Tram in Lisbon

travel network lisbon

TripSavvy / Gautier Houba 

Lisbon’s trams are a backdrop to any visit to the Portuguese capital , their distinctive squeaks and rattles alerting to their presence throughout the downtown area. You can’t walk past any souvenir store without seeing a postcard of the famous yellow #28 tram . With its vintage wooden cars and winding route through the city’s most historic areas, it’s no surprise thousands of visitors line up to take a trip on it every day.​

The trams aren’t just a tourist attraction, though. With lines stretching as far afield as Algés in the west, coupled with the city’s notorious hills, they’re equally popular with locals.

It’s not difficult to ride the trams in Lisbon , but as with most public transport systems, a bit of knowledge and preparation goes a long way. Here’s how to do it.

There are five tram routes in Lisbon, all of which go through the downtown area. The numbered lines are all followed by the letter ‘E’, which stands for electrico (electric).

While the historic #28 tram between Martim Moniz and Campo do Orique is the most popular, many visitors will also find themselves on the more modern #15, which runs along the river all the way to (and slightly past) Belém . Both routes can get extremely crowded in summer, especially at weekends. For a quieter, more relaxed trip, take one of the other lines.

The number 25 tram, for instance, also finishes in Campo do Orique, taking in the Estrela Basilica and a few more local neighborhoods , before finishing with a short run along the riverside to the base of the hill at Alfama.

For a shorter journey, jump on the #12. This tram loops around the heart of the old city in just 20 minutes, going past the cathedral, the gorgeous Santa Luzia viewpoint, St Anthony’s church, and more. Unlike the other routes, this tram only travels in a single (clockwise) direction.

Finally, the #18 follows the river for a mile and a half from the Cais do Sodre interchange, before turning north before the April 25 th bridge, and finishing up at the Ajuda cemetery. It’s often the least busy of the tram routes, as there are fewer tourist attractions along the way.

Buying Tickets

All lines have the option of buying a ticket on board, although how you do so depends on the tram. The price is per ride, so it doesn’t matter whether you’re going one stop or all the way to the end. On most routes, you simply hand your money to the driver as you board, while the larger, more modern articulated trams on the #15 route have ticket machines inside.

Note, however, that there are several disadvantages to buying tickets this way. On busy routes, the front of the tram can be very congested, making it difficult to deal with money and tickets as you board. Using the machines is slightly easier on the #15 trams, but they don’t give change, so you may end up paying more than necessary if you don’t have the exact amount.

Speaking of paying too much, buying onboard costs twice as much as using a pre-purchased ticket or pass. To save money, time and hassle, go to a metro station, marked kiosk or post office ahead of time, and buy a day pass or preload a Viva Viagem pass with as much credit as you need.

Boarding and Riding the Tram

On the vintage trams used on the majority of routes, passengers board at the front and disembark at the rear. You’ll be unpopular if you try doing it the other way!

On the larger #15 tram cars, passengers use all doors to get on and off. At busy times, wait until most people have disembarked before trying to get on yourself.

In either case, if you’re using a pre-purchased pass, don’t forget to swipe it on the reader as you enter the tram. Even if you have a day pass, you’re still required to validate it on each journey. There’s no need to swipe again when you leave.

Due to Lisbon’s steep hills, elderly people often use the tram to avoid having to make the climb up and down the cobbled streets. On crowded trams, giving up your seat to pensioners is always well-received!

The only real danger on Lisbon’s trams, other than the heat of an over-full carriage in summer , is pickpockets. They’re known to regularly operate on both the #28 and #15 lines, where the mixture of tourists and crowds presents a tempting target.

Particularly on those routes, be sure to keep your valuables secure. Don’t put your wallet, phone or anything else you can’t afford to lose in your back pocket, and keep your bag or daypack closed and in front of you at all times. Be aware of people deliberately bumping into you, especially when boarding or leaving the tram.

Tips for the #28

A trip on the #28 tram is often called a ‘must-see’ in guidebooks, and for an obvious reason – it’s an unusual and inexpensive way of getting a tour through the heart of one of the most beautiful cities in Europe. That popularity, though, comes at a price.

In the height of the summer tourist season, it’s not unusual to have to wait up to an hour to be able to board one of the trams – which will then be completely full for almost the entirety of your journey. As well as being hot and uncomfortable, the overcrowding also makes it difficult to see or take photos of the cityscape that’s the main reason for your journey.

There are no guarantees, but following these few tips will give you the best chance of a less-crowded, more enjoyable trip.

  • Buy your ticket in advance. As mentioned earlier, it’s cheaper, and much easier, to just swipe a pre-purchased pass than mess around buying a ticket on a packed tram.
  • Travel at off-peak times. The tram is busy throughout the day, but peak times run from around 9:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. If you can take your trip at night, or early in the morning, it’ll be a lot less crowded.
  • Get on at the first stop. If you think boarding the tram at Martim Moniz is difficult, try doing it anywhere else in the downtown area. In summer, it’s practically impossible.
  • The best tip of all: Strongly consider riding in the opposite direction. Rather than joining that endless line at Martim Moniz, start your journey at the other end, in Campo do Orique. It’s exactly the same route, with fewer people taking it. Get there by taxi, on the #25 tram, or enjoy the 45-minute walk from Chiado.

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The Perfect Itinerary For Exploring Lisbon's Vibrant Sights

  • Last updated Jun 12, 2024
  • Difficulty Beginner

Arjun Yadav

  • Category Travel

how many days to travel in lisbon

Lisbon, the vibrant capital of Portugal, is a city that seamlessly combines history and modernity, offering visitors a perfect blend of old-world charm and cosmopolitan energy. With its stunning architecture, cobblestone streets, and lively atmosphere, it's no wonder that Lisbon has become a popular destination for travelers from around the world. Whether you're a history buff, a food lover, or just someone who wants to soak up the city's unique ambiance, this article will guide you through the perfect itinerary for exploring Lisbon's vibrant sights. So grab your walking shoes and get ready to discover all that this enchanting city has to offer.

What You'll Learn

Best time to visit lisbon for a short trip, must-see attractions in lisbon for a 3-day itinerary, exploring lisbon's neighborhoods in 4 days, tips for maximizing your travel days in lisbon.

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If you're planning a short trip to Lisbon, one of the most important factors to consider is the number of days you'll need to fully explore and enjoy all that this beautiful city has to offer. While there is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, there are some factors you can consider to help you determine the best length for your visit.

One of the first things to consider is your specific interests and preferences. Are you someone who prefers a relaxed pace, taking your time to explore each attraction in depth? Or do you prefer to cover as much ground as possible, seeing as many sights as you can in a short amount of time? This will help you determine if you need more or fewer days in the city.

Another factor to consider is the time of year you plan to visit. Lisbon can get quite crowded during peak tourist season, which is typically from May to September. If you're visiting during this time, you may want to allocate a few extra days to account for any long lines or wait times at popular attractions. On the other hand, if you're visiting during the off-peak season, you may be able to cover more ground in a shorter amount of time.

With these factors in mind, here is a suggested itinerary for a 3-day trip to Lisbon:

Day 1: Arrive in Lisbon and get settled in your accommodation. Start your day by exploring the historic neighborhood of Alfama, with its narrow winding streets and picturesque buildings. Visit the São Jorge Castle for panoramic views of the city. In the afternoon, head to the Belém district to visit the iconic Belém Tower and the Jerónimos Monastery. End your day by enjoying a traditional Portuguese dinner in one of the local restaurants.

Day 2: Take a day trip to the nearby town of Sintra, known for its fairytale-like palaces and gardens. Spend the morning exploring the Pena Palace and the Castle of the Moors. In the afternoon, visit the picturesque town center and indulge in some local pastries. Return to Lisbon in the evening and take a leisurely stroll along the waterfront promenade.

Day 3: Spend your last day in Lisbon exploring the more modern side of the city. Start by visiting the LX Factory, a trendy arts and culture hub located in a converted industrial complex. Afterward, head to the Belem Cultural Center to see some contemporary art exhibitions. In the afternoon, take a ride on the iconic yellow tram 28, which will take you through some of the city's most charming neighborhoods. End your day by enjoying a traditional Portuguese fado performance and a delicious seafood dinner.

Of course, this is just one suggested itinerary, and you can always adjust it to fit your specific interests and preferences. If you have more time, you can consider visiting other nearby cities such as Cascais or Évora. Ultimately, the number of days you'll need to travel in Lisbon will depend on your personal preferences and the time you have available. With proper planning and efficient use of time, you can make the most of your short trip to this vibrant and historic city.

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Lisbon, the charming capital of Portugal, is a city that offers a perfect blend of historical sites, vibrant culture, delicious cuisine, and breathtaking views. With so much to see and do, planning a 3-day itinerary can be overwhelming. However, with careful planning and prioritizing, you can experience the best of Lisbon in just three days. Here is a detailed guide to the must-see attractions in Lisbon for a 3-day itinerary.

Day 1: Explore the Historic Districts

Start your first day in Lisbon by exploring the historic districts of Alfama and Baixa. Begin your day by visiting Castelo de S. Jorge, a medieval castle that offers stunning panoramic views of the city. From there, stroll through the narrow streets of Alfama, the oldest neighborhood in Lisbon, and soak in the atmosphere of this charming district. Don't miss the opportunity to visit the Lisbon Cathedral, also known as Sé de Lisboa, which is located in Alfama.

Afterwards, head to Baixa, the heart of the city, and explore the bustling streets and beautiful squares. The highlight of Baixa is the Praça do Comércio, a grand square facing the Tagus River. Take a walk along Rua Augusta, the main shopping street in Baixa, and indulge in some retail therapy. End your day by visiting the Elevador de Santa Justa, an iconic cast-iron elevator that provides stunning views over Lisbon.

Day 2: Discover Belém

On your second day in Lisbon, venture out to the neighborhood of Belém, located to the west of the city center. Start your day by visiting the UNESCO-listed Belém Tower, a 16th-century fortress that served as a defense system and a ceremonial gateway to Lisbon. Next, make your way to the Padrão dos Descobrimentos, a monument dedicated to the Age of Discoveries.

No visit to Belém is complete without trying the famous Pastéis de Belém, a traditional Portuguese custard tart. Head to Antiga Confeitaria de Belém, the birthplace of pastéis de nata, and savor these mouthwatering treats.

Afterwards, visit the impressive Jerónimos Monastery, another UNESCO World Heritage site. This stunning example of Manueline architecture showcases the wealth and power of Portugal during the Age of Discoveries. End your day by taking a leisurely stroll along the waterfront and enjoying the views of the Tagus River.

Day 3: Experience Modern Lisbon

On your final day in Lisbon, immerse yourself in the modern side of the city. Begin by visiting the Parque das Nações, a revitalized district that was built for the World Expo '98. This waterfront area is home to several modern attractions, including the Oceanário de Lisboa, one of the largest aquariums in Europe, and the Vasco da Gama Bridge, the longest bridge in Europe.

Next, head to the LX Factory, a creative hub located in a former industrial complex. This vibrant space is filled with trendy shops, art galleries, and trendy restaurants. Don't miss the opportunity to visit the Ler Devagar bookstore, a must-see spot for book lovers.

In the afternoon, make your way to the trendy neighborhood of Bairro Alto. Known for its vibrant nightlife, Bairro Alto is packed with a variety of bars and clubs. Enjoy a delicious dinner at one of the many traditional Portuguese restaurants in the area, and then explore the lively streets as the night unfolds.

With this 3-day itinerary, you will be able to experience the best that Lisbon has to offer, from its rich history to its modern attractions. Whether you are a history buff, a foodie, or a lover of vibrant nightlife, Lisbon has something for everyone. Get ready to be captivated by the beauty and charm of this fascinating city.

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If you're planning a trip to Lisbon, you'll want to make the most of your time in this vibrant and charming city. Lisbon is known for its beautiful architecture, picturesque neighborhoods, delicious food, and friendly atmosphere. With so much to see and do, it can be overwhelming to plan your itinerary. However, with four days in Lisbon, you can explore many of the city's fascinating neighborhoods and experience its unique culture. Here's a suggested itinerary to help you make the most of your time in Lisbon.

Day 1: Alfama and Mouraria

Start your exploration of Lisbon in the historic neighborhoods of Alfama and Mouraria. Alfama is known for its narrow streets, traditional fado music, and stunning views of the city. Take some time to wander the winding streets and discover hidden shops and cafes. Don't miss the Lisbon Cathedral, a magnificent example of Romanesque architecture. From there, head to the nearby neighborhood of Mouraria, which is also known for its fado music and multicultural vibe. Visit the Moorish quarter and explore its colorful streets. In the evening, plan to catch a fado performance at one of the local bars or restaurants.

Day 2: Baixa and Chiado

On your second day in Lisbon, explore the downtown area known as Baixa. This neighborhood is famous for its beautiful squares, grand avenues, and elegant architecture. Start at Praça do Comércio, a stunning waterfront square, and make your way up Avenida da Liberdade, one of Lisbon's main boulevards. Take some time to explore the shops, cafes, and historical landmarks along the way. As you make your way to the top of the boulevard, you'll reach the neighborhood of Chiado. Chiado is known for its trendy shops, bohemian atmosphere, and charming cafes. Don't miss a visit to the iconic Café A Brasileira, a historic coffee house frequented by artists and intellectuals in the past.

Day 3: Belém and Estrela

On your third day, venture outside of the city center to the neighborhood of Belém. Belém is located along the Tagus River and is famous for its iconic landmarks. Start your day at the Belém Tower, a UNESCO World Heritage site that dates back to the 16th century. From there, visit the Jerónimos Monastery, another impressive example of Manueline architecture. Don't leave Belém without trying a pastel de nata, a famous Portuguese custard tart, from the renowned bakery, Pasteis de Belém. In the afternoon, head to the neighborhood of Estrela, where you can visit the beautiful Estrela Basilica and relax in the nearby Jardim da Estrela park.

Day 4: Bairro Alto and Príncipe Real

For your final day in Lisbon, explore the vibrant neighborhoods of Bairro Alto and Príncipe Real. Bairro Alto is famous for its lively nightlife scene, with numerous bars, restaurants, and clubs. During the day, the neighborhood is quiet, allowing you to explore its picturesque streets and stunning viewpoints. In the afternoon, head to Príncipe Real, a trendy neighborhood known for its boutique shops, art galleries, and beautiful gardens. Don't miss a visit to the Embaixada, a stunning concept store housed in a 19th-century palace. End your day with a dinner at one of the neighborhood's excellent restaurants.

With four days in Lisbon, you'll have plenty of time to explore the city's diverse neighborhoods and immerse yourself in its vibrant culture. From the historic streets of Alfama to the trendy shops of Príncipe Real, Lisbon has something to offer every traveler. So pack your bags and get ready to discover the magic of the Portuguese capital.

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Are you planning a trip to Lisbon? With its charming neighborhoods, stunning architecture, and delicious food, there's no doubt that this Portuguese capital is a must-visit destination. But how many days should you allocate for your trip to fully explore and experience all that Lisbon has to offer? In this blog post, we'll share some tips for maximizing your travel days in Lisbon.

  • Start with at least 3-4 days: While it's possible to see some of the highlights of Lisbon in just a day or two, we recommend allocating at least 3-4 days to truly appreciate the city. This will give you enough time to explore the different districts, visit the historical sites, and indulge in the local cuisine.
  • Plan your itinerary wisely: Lisbon is divided into several exciting neighborhoods, each with its own unique charm. Be sure to research and plan your itinerary in advance to make the most of your time. Allocate specific days for visiting areas like Baixa, Alfama, Belem, and Chiado, which are known for their architectural wonders, cultural sites, and vibrant atmosphere.
  • Take advantage of public transportation: Lisbon has an efficient public transportation system, including trams, buses, and metro lines. Utilize these modes of transportation to get around the city quickly and save time. Consider purchasing a reusable ticket card, such as the Lisboa Card, which offers unlimited access to public transportation and discounts on various attractions.
  • Avoid rush hour: Like any major city, Lisbon can be crowded during peak commuting hours. To make the most of your travel days, try to avoid rush hour (typically between 8-10 am and 6-8 pm). This will not only save you time but also allow you to explore popular attractions without the crowds.
  • Try local dishes with fast service: Lisbon is known for its delicious food, so it's only natural that you'd want to try as much as possible. However, dining out can take up a significant chunk of your day. Consider trying local dishes with fast service options, such as pastel de nata (a traditional custard tart) and bifanas (pork sandwiches). These snacks can be enjoyed on the go, allowing you to save time for sightseeing.
  • Take advantage of early mornings and late evenings: The early mornings and late evenings in Lisbon are often less crowded, making them the perfect times to explore popular attractions. Consider waking up early to catch the sunrise at the Miradouro da Senhora do Monte or enjoying a late evening stroll along the Tagus River. These quieter moments will allow you to appreciate the beauty of the city without the crowds.
  • Be selective with museums and attractions: Lisbon is home to numerous museums and attractions, but visiting all of them can be time-consuming. Prioritize the ones that interest you the most and allocate specific times for visiting them. Consider purchasing skip-the-line tickets in advance to save time and avoid long queues.

By following these tips, you can make the most of your travel days in Lisbon. Remember to plan your itinerary wisely, take advantage of public transportation, and be efficient with your time. With its rich history, vibrant culture, and stunning views, Lisbon is a city that deserves to be explored at a leisurely pace.

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Qatar Airways expands network in Europe with flight resumption to Lisbon, Portugal

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Qatar Airways has proudly welcomed the return of its non-stop flights between the airline’s award-winning hub, Hamad International Airport (DOH), and Lisbon’s Humberto Delgado Airport (LIS). Addressing the high seasonal demand of the popular travel destination, Qatar Airways will operate to Lisbon year-round with six weekly flights during summer 2024.

Qatar Airways Chief Commercial Officer, Thierry Antinori, said: “As we continue our network expansion in the European market, we are thrilled to welcome back Lisbon to our global network of more than 170 destinations. This addition reaffirms the airline’s dedication to connecting people and places, making international travel more accessible and convenient across our global network.”

With scenic beaches, thriving cosmopolitan cities and several UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Lisbon offers the perfect starting point for travellers eager to explore the rich tourism and cultural offerings of Portugal.

As the latest addition to Qatar Airways’ global network of more than 170 destinations, the resumed route is the 47th European destination served by the airline. Lisbon also opens up a new entry point for international travel from Europe to the Middle East, Africa, as well as the Indian subcontinent. Some of the most popular destinations for travellers from Lisbon include, Bali, Bangkok, Delhi, Denpasar, Kathmandu, and Male.

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Qatar Airways Relaunches Doha-Lisbon Direct Flights

  • Lisbon flights with Qatar Airways resumed last week, offering six weekly flights during the summer season.
  • Qatar Airways flies to over 170 destinations with 200+ aircraft, focusing on global network expansion.
  • Qatar Airways has other European operations planned, including Venice and Hamburg flights launching this year.

Qatar Airways has resumed flights to the Westernmost European point in its network, Lisbon. The route will have six weekly flights during the summer and will be reduced during the rest of the year.

Back in Lisbon

Qatar Airways is a massive global airline, flying to more than 170 destinations with 200+ aircraft. Using Hamad International Airport in Doha as its base, the airline carried almost 32 million passengers in the 2022-2023 fiscal year, helped by the FIFA World Cup which took place in December. Though the airline has bounced back well from the pandemic, its network has not been fully restored.

Flights to Lisbon’s Humberto Delgado Airport were first launched in June 2019, but the route had been put on pause because of the COVID-19 pandemic. When Qatar announced the route’s resumption in February, Simple Flying reported that flights would be operated four times weekly, but that has changed. LIS-DOH will operate year-round, but during the summer, the airline will deploy its Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners six times weekly on the 3,618-mile route.

Qatar resumed operations on the route last week, on June 6. One peculiar note about the route is that it does not operate on a regular schedule, with the departure changing almost every day. For example, today’s departure from Doha is scheduled for 08:25, while tomorrow’s flight will depart at 00:55 and at 07:30 on Wednesday. Of course, the same goes for the return legs. The one constant is that the aircraft type is the same.

"As we continue our network expansion in the European market, we are thrilled to welcome back Lisbon to our global network of more than 170 destinations. This addition reaffirms the airline's dedication to connecting people and places, making international travel more accessible and convenient across our global network. - Thierry Antinori, Chief Commercial Officer, Qatar Airways

According to data from Cirium , an aviation analytics firm, Qatar Airways has 42 roundtrip flights scheduled between Lisbon and Doha this month, offering 10,668 seats on the route. Next month, that number will increase slightly to 54 flights and 13,716 seats. By October, flights will drop to five times weekly, and by December, to four.

Additional European operations

In December, Qatar Airways unveiled its summer schedule for this year, and announced it was returning to Venice this month and launching flights to Hamburg in July. Flights to both destinations will operate daily, with flight times to Hamburg alternating on certain days, while flights to Venice will be on one set schedule.

European Connectivity: Qatar Airways Announces 2024 Network Expansion

Data shows that in July, Qatar has 5,208 roundtrip flights to Europe, offering more than 1.4 million seats. It should not come as a surprise that the airline’s busiest European route is to Heathrow Airport in London.

London is one of the most well-connected airports in the world, and in July, the airline will fly there up to eight times daily. There, passengers can connect anywhere on British Airways’ network as the two are part of the one world alliance. Additionally, passengers can connect to the United States on American Airlines, although Qatar does serve plenty of American destinations.

Qatar Airways Relaunches Doha-Lisbon Direct Flights

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    The 2024 Lisbon metro fare prices are: • €1.80 - Single Fare. • €6.80 - 24-hour unlimited travel, which includes all Lisbon buses and trams. • €1.47 - Fare when using the pre-loaded 'Zapping' ticket (see zapping section later in this article) There are no return tickets, but multiple single tickets can be purchased for return ...

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    The simplest combination - known as Carris/Metro - allows you to travel using the same ticket on buses, trams, elevators, funiculars and the metro for €6.60. CityMapper is the best map and public transport app for travelers to Lisbon, and locals use it frequently.

  3. LISBON METRO

    A single ride is €1.65, but there's a 24-hour ticket for unlimited travel for €6.60. That 24-ticket includes the city's buses and trams. Using a contactless card or mobile phone is the easiest way to pay for a Lisbon Metro ride.

  4. Getting Around Lisbon

    The metro is the quickest and most practical way to travel around the city. The metro network has a total of 4 lines, each identified by a different colour: green (Telheiras - Cais do Sodré), blue (Reboleira - Santa Apolónia), yellow (Odivelas - Rato) and red (Aeroporto - São Sebastião).. The metro service runs from 6.30am-1am every day. ...

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    Lisbon public transport prices with maps and options. One way by bus, tram, lift or metro - 1,50 €. 24-hour ticket for tram, metro, lifts, buses - cost: 6.40 €. 24-hour ticket for tram, metro, lifts, buses and ferries from Transtejo to Cacilhas - cost €9.50.

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    Arrival date. Departure date. Find deals. Show all the cheap hotels. Lisbon's public transport system is extense and diverse. It features a metro network, a tram system, various funiculars, urban buses and ferries. Learn the best ways use them.

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    The public transportation network in Lisbon is managed by Carris, which operates the trams and buses, and Metropolitano de Lisboa, which oversees the metro system. Additionally, the city's train services are managed by CP (Comboios de Portugal) and ferry services by Transtejo & Soflusa. ... By using a travel card, you can navigate Lisbon's ...

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    Last but not least, the Lisboa Card. This is THE travel card for Lisbon. Aside from unlimited rides on the Lisbon public transportation network, you have free entrance to 35 museums, top monuments and attractions! This way, you can enjoy the main tourist attractions in Lisbon for a great price. There are three options: 24, 48 and 72-hour passes ...

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    The top attractions in Lisbon, including the Jerónimos Monastery and Castelo de São Jorge, get extremely crowded, and it will make your life much easier to purchase tickets in advance! This Lisbon travel tip goes for nearby Sintra, too, especially at the iconic Pena Palace and the dreamy Quinta da Regaleira.

  11. Lisbon Urban Trains: Train times, Prices and Discounts

    There are also interfaces with the Metro, Lisbon buses and the Tagus ferries, offering intermodal transport solutions with other operators and access to car parks. The Lisbon urban trains call at 67 stations on the following lines: Sintra line; Azambuja line; Cascais line; Sado line. See the network zones map here and train-metro network map here.

  12. Carris

    Yellowbus | Official Sightseeing Tours. Discover the places and secrets that make Lisbon a unique city. Climb aboard one of our vehicles and let yourself be transported between hills, river and the main squares and Avenues. Carris site where you can find all information about public transport to the surface of the city of Lisbon.

  13. Lisbon Travel Guide & Tips

    Lisbon Travel Guide. When it comes to Lisbon, it's safe to say the secret's out. The coastal capital sees 4.5 million annual visitors, most of whom flock to the city for its fado music, historic ...

  14. The Lisbon Tram Network, More Than Just Tram 28

    For €6.40 you can use any Lisbon tram, bus or metro line for 24 hours. For €9.50 the ferry to Cacilhas is also included. You should buy this pass if you want to cross the Tejo and visit the other side of the river. The last one costs €10.55 and it includes the trams, buses, the metro and the CP trains inside Lisbon.

  15. Lisbon tram guide

    This is the best way for you to travel from central Lisbon to Belem. Related article: E15 tram guide. Warning: Highly skilled pickpockets operate along this ... The tram is an important part of Lisbon's public transport network and the operational hours reflect the importance of each route. For the 15E and 28E, the services start early in the ...

  16. Lisbon Trams Guide

    Lisbon 2024 Deals! Find discounts of 10% to 70% on accommodation in Lisbon! Look for deals here: Lisbon Hotels, Apartments, Hostels. Before you travel: 1. Explore the 10 must-see attractions. 2. Find hotels or apartments. 3. See your transportation options. 4. Get the tourist card. 5. Skip lines, get your attraction tickets. 6. Discover the ...

  17. 3 Days in Lisbon: The Perfect Lisbon Itinerary

    All it takes is 3 days in Lisbon to fall hard for this city, and by following this 3-day Lisbon itinerary you won't have any trouble finding out why. Insider Tip: Save time and money with the Lisbon Card. The card gives you free access to 23 city museums and attractions, as well as unlimited use of public transport.

  18. Lisbon Tram

    The heritage trams are small, nostalgic and an emblematic symbol of Lisbon, making for great photos. The price of the ticket for the Lisbon tramway on board is € 3 ( US$ 3.30), while if you use the 7 Colinas Card, the price is € 1.50 ( US$ 1.60) per trip. Of the five routes, we recommend two:

  19. How to Ride the Tram in Lisbon

    The best tip of all: Strongly consider riding in the opposite direction. Rather than joining that endless line at Martim Moniz, start your journey at the other end, in Campo do Orique. It's exactly the same route, with fewer people taking it. Get there by taxi, on the #25 tram, or enjoy the 45-minute walk from Chiado.

  20. The Perfect Itinerary For Exploring Lisbon's Vibrant Sights

    However, with careful planning and prioritizing, you can experience the best of Lisbon in just three days. Here is a detailed guide to the must-see attractions in Lisbon for a 3-day itinerary. Day 1: Explore the Historic Districts. Start your first day in Lisbon by exploring the historic districts of Alfama and Baixa.

  21. Qatar Airways expands network in Europe with flight resumption to

    Addressing the high seasonal demand of the popular travel destination, Qatar Airways will operate to Lisbon year-round with six weekly flights during summer 2024. Qatar Airways Chief Commercial ...

  22. Travel: Why World Heritage treasure Lisbon is pulling in the tourists

    With it, democracy came to Portugal, paving the way for the country's 1986 entry into the European Economic Community. In the years since, much has changed, and that's especially true in the ...

  23. Qatar Airways Expands European Network with Resumption of Lisbon

    With six weekly flights during summer 2024, Qatar Airways addresses the high seasonal demand for travel to Lisbon, offering passengers seamless connectivity to over 170 destinations worldwide ...

  24. Qatar Airways Relaunches Doha-Lisbon Direct Flights

    Back in Lisbon . Qatar Airways is a massive global airline, flying to more than 170 destinations with 200+ aircraft. Using Hamad International Airport in Doha as its base, the airline carried ...