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The 50 most influential travellers of our time

By Condé Nast Traveller

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Angelina Jolie

Hollywood humanitarian and the un's special envoy superwoman read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

The Dalai Lama

Nobel peace prize-winning monk-on-the-move spreading happiness from the himalayas to the white house read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Pharrell Williams

Stratospheric singer-producer-fashion designer happy writing songs onboard his private jet read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Prince Charles

King-in-waiting on a permanent gap year read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Levison Wood

Extraordinary ex-paratrooper and tv adventurer who has walked the himalayas and the nile read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Melinda Gates

The tech whizz giving her heart and her fortune to the world's greatest causes read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Richard Branson

Adventurer, entrepreneur, philanthropist and pioneer of commercial space travel read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

The Beckhams

Ultimate celebrity family whose world has no borders read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Bruce Dickinson

Iron maiden frontman and hero of the skies read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Janine di Giovanni

Fearless frontline foreign correspondent and war reporter read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

The world's most famous anonymous graffiti artist stencilling from London to the Louvre read more

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Sheryl Sandberg

The lean in author and facebook coo inspiring women across the world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Rene Redzepi

Culinary revolutionist and superstar chef of best-restaurant-in-the-world noma read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Dervla Murphy

Tireless traveller and octogenarian author of 24 travel books who will sometimes stop for a pint read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Billionaire inventor (PayPal, Tesla, SpaceX) setting his sights on Mars read more

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Christine Lagarde

Dynamic head of the imf brokering global trade deals read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Sir David Tang

Hong kong-born billionaire bon viveur known worldwide for his legendary parties read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Hanli Prinsloo

The south african record freediver exploring the world's oceans one breath at a time read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

College-dropout turned trailblazing tech entrepreneur read more

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Edurne Pasaban

Indomitable mountain-climber and the first woman to summit the planet's 14 highest peaks read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Karim Rashid

The willy wonka of design, reshaping the world around us read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Susan Wojcicki

Youtube ceo and champion of working mothers read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Bethan Gray

Exquisite furniture designer inspired by traditional crafts around the world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Federica Mogherini

High-flying (though always in economy class) politician on a mission to promote world peace read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Antonio Pappano

Energetic royal opera house music director conducting concerts across europe read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Gavin Thurston

Bafta-award-winning cameraman behind the lens of the world's greatest wildlife documentaries read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

George Butler

British illustrator capturing struggles in the world's danger zones read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Colonel John Blashford-Snell

The maverick intrepid explorer who has inspired adventurers from sir ranulph fiennes to bear grylls read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Frank Gardner

The bbc's security correspondent who has reported on conflicts and crises from afghanistan to the arctic read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Maggie Draycott

The woman behind the world's most exclusive (and highly secretive) frequent-flyer's club read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Pope Francis

He can draw crowds of millions around the world, flying between destinations on his plane shepherd one read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Bushcraft survival specialist who runs expeditions from Borneo to the Kalahari, via the Lake District read more

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Isabelle Legeron

Natural-wine champion unearthing the greatest vineyards across the globe read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

The 'Indiana Jones of surgery' dodging bullets to save lives in war zones read more

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Lucia Griggi

Surf photographer who has ridden waves in almost every surf destination in the world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Justine Evans

Planet earth documentary camerawoman shooting out in the wild read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Karen Darke

Paralympic gold medallist who has travelled the globe by bike, ski and kayak read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Mulatu Astatke

'travelling troubadour' and 73-year-old father of ethiopian jazz playing sell-out concerts around the world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Andrea Marshall

Marine biologist diving the world's oceans who can recognize individual manta rays by the spots on their backs read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

David Wright

Committed charity worker trying to improve the lives of the next generation read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Helen Clark

Snapchatting former new zealand pm and the un's top development advocate read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Gail Rebuck

The most powerful and well-travelled woman in the publishing world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Anita Zabludowicz

Voracious international art collector with galleries around the world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

David Macdonald

Oxford's first professor of wildlife conservation saving endangered species around the world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Cherae Robinson

Hip and happening entrepreneur revolutionising travel across africa read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Anna McNuff

Adventuring athlete who runs, rides and rollerblades wherever her social media followers send her read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Sue & Bleddyn Wynn-Jones

Intrepid rare-plant hunters scouring wildernesses from jungle to desert read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Jason Atherton

Impeccably groomed superstar chef and global restaurateur from balham read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Galahad Clark

The cobbler encouraging us to go barefoot as we tramp around the world read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

Hong Ra-Hee

South korean art collector and champion of emerging artists read more.

The 50 most influential travellers of our time

By Michelle Jana Chan and Harriet Compston

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20 Most Famous Travellers In History

  • by Jonny Duncan
  • February 17, 2024 February 18, 2024

These famous travellers, driven by curiosity, ambition, or a quest for knowledge, embarked on epic expeditions that expanded the boundaries of geographical understanding.

Famous Travellers

Throughout history, the world has been shaped by the journeys of these famous travellers, intrepid explorers and adventurers who dared to traverse distant lands, cross treacherous seas, and delve into uncharted territories.

From the ancient Silk Road wanderers to the modern-day spacefarers, their stories inspire awe and wonder, reminding us of the boundless spirit of exploration that resides within the human soul.

These are some detailed accounts of the lives of these famous travellers and explorers.

traveller famous

Marco Polo is one of the most famous travellers in history whom you have most likely heard of already. He was a Venetian merchant, explorer, and writer who travelled extensively throughout Asia along the Silk Road.

Born in Venice in 1254, Marco Polo embarked on a journey to the East with his father Niccolò and uncle Maffeo in 1271, when he was only 17 years old. They travelled through Central Asia, reaching the court of Kublai Khan, the Mongol ruler of the Yuan Dynasty in China.

Marco Polo served as an emissary and official in the court of Kublai Khan for approximately 17 years, during which he travelled extensively throughout China, Mongolia, and other parts of Asia. He documented his travels and experiences in a book titled “Il Milione” or “The Travels of Marco Polo,” which became one of the most famous travelogues in history.

In his book, Marco Polo described the geography, culture, and customs of the regions he visited, introducing Europeans to many aspects of Asian life for the first time. His accounts of the riches of the East, including spices, silks, and other exotic goods, fueled European interest in trade and exploration with Asia.

He died in 1324 in Venice, leaving behind a lasting legacy as one of history’s most famous travellers.

Ibn Battuta

traveller famous

Ibn Battuta , fully known as Abu Abdullah Muhammad ibn Battuta, was a Moroccan scholar and explorer born in Tangier in 1304. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest travellers in history, known for his extensive journeys across Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe during the 14th century.

In 1325, at the age of 21, Ibn Battuta embarked on his first major journey, which would span nearly 30 years and cover over 75,000 miles. He initially set out on a pilgrimage to Mecca (Hajj), a religious obligation for Muslims, but his travels went far beyond this initial goal.

Throughout his travels, Ibn Battuta visited places such as Egypt, the Arabian Peninsula, Persia (modern-day Iran), Central Asia, India, Southeast Asia, and East Africa. He served as a judge, diplomat, and advisor in various courts along the way, gaining insights into the cultures, societies, and politics of the regions he visited.

Ibn Battuta documented his experiences in a travelogue called “Rihla” (The Journey), which provides valuable insights into the medieval world and remains an important historical source. His writings offer vivid descriptions of the places he visited, including cities, landmarks, people, customs, and traditions.

Ibn Battuta’s travels were remarkable not only for their extent but also for the diversity of the regions he explored and the challenges he overcame. His adventures have left an enduring legacy, contributing to our understanding of medieval geography, cultures, and interactions.

Charles Darwin 

traveller famous

Charles Darwin was a renowned traveller. His most famous voyage was aboard the HMS Beagle, a British naval vessel that embarked on a five-year expedition around the world from 1831 to 1836. Darwin was originally intended to be the ship’s naturalist, but his observations and discoveries during this voyage ultimately led to his groundbreaking work in evolutionary biology.

During the voyage, Darwin visited various locations, including the Galápagos Islands, where he made significant observations of the unique flora and fauna that would later inform his theory of natural selection. His travels also took him to South America, the Pacific Islands, Australia, and other parts of the world.

Darwin meticulously documented his observations in journals and collected specimens that contributed to his later scientific investigations and publications, most notably his seminal work “ On the Origin of Species ,” published in 1859.

Wilfred Thesiger

traveller famous

Wilfred Thesiger, born on June 3, 1910, was a British explorer, travel writer, and photographer known for his extensive travels in the deserts of Africa and the Middle East. He is renowned for his profound respect for traditional cultures and his vivid descriptions of the landscapes and people he encountered.

Thesiger’s most famous journeys took place in the deserts of the Arabian Peninsula. He first travelled to the region in the 1940s, where he lived among the Bedouin tribes of southern Arabia, including the Marsh Arabs of Iraq and the nomadic tribes of the Empty Quarter (Rub’ al Khali). Thesiger’s experiences during these journeys were documented in his classic books “Arabian Sands” (1959) and “The Marsh Arabs” (1964).

Backpackingman note: Arabian Sands is one of my favourite travel memoirs that I have read.

Thesiger’s writings reflect his deep admiration for the harsh beauty of the desert and his respect for the traditional way of life practised by the nomadic peoples who inhabit these regions. He was critical of the modernization and development that threatened to erode the ancient cultures and landscapes he cherished.

In addition to his writings, Thesiger was also an accomplished photographer, capturing stunning images of the landscapes, peoples, and cultures of the regions he explored. His photographs provide a visual record of a way of life that has since undergone significant changes.

Thesiger’s legacy continues to inspire adventurers, travellers, and writers today, as his works remain celebrated for their insight, empathy, and evocative prose. He passed away on August 24, 2003, at the age of 93.

Fridtjof Nansen

traveller famous

Fridtjof Nansen was a Norwegian explorer, scientist, diplomat, and humanitarian who lived from 1861 to 1930. He is best known for his groundbreaking explorations of the Arctic region and his innovative work in oceanography. Nansen’s achievements earned him international acclaim and left a lasting legacy in multiple fields.

Nansen gained fame for his daring expedition aboard the ship Fram (meaning “Forward”) in 1893-1896. His goal was to reach the North Pole by allowing the ship to become frozen in the Arctic ice and drift with the currents.

Although the expedition did not reach the pole, it set a record for the farthest north latitude attained at that time and provided valuable scientific data about the Arctic Ocean.

Freya Stark

traveller famous

Freya Stark was a British explorer, travel writer, and cartographer known for her extensive travels in the Middle East and her vivid writings about the region. She was born on January 31, 1893, in Paris, France, and grew up in England.

Stark began her travels in the Middle East in the 1920s and 1930s, at a time when few Westerners, especially women, ventured into the region. She explored remote and challenging areas of the Middle East, including parts of Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey.

Stark was known for her adventurous spirit, intelligence, and ability to connect with people from different cultures. She learned several languages, including Arabic and Persian, which allowed her to communicate with local inhabitants and gain insights into their lives and customs.

Throughout her travels, Stark produced numerous books, articles, and photographs documenting her experiences and observations. Her writings are celebrated for their lyrical prose, keen observations, and deep appreciation for the landscapes, cultures, and history of the Middle East.

Some of Stark’s most famous works include “The Valleys of the Assassins” (1934), “A Winter in Arabia” (1940), and “The Southern Gates of Arabia” (1936). Her books became bestsellers and earned her widespread acclaim as one of the most accomplished travel writers of her time.

Freya Stark continued to travel and write well into her later years, and her legacy as a pioneering explorer and cultural ambassador for the Middle East endures today. Her works remain influential and continue to inspire travellers, writers, and scholars interested in the region. She passed away on May 9, 1993, at the age of 100.

David Livingstone

traveller famous

David Livingstone was a Scottish physician and explorer who played a significant role in the exploration of Africa during the 19th century.

Over the course of his life, Livingstone undertook multiple expeditions across the African continent, with the primary goals of spreading Christianity, combating the slave trade, and exploring unknown regions.

Livingstone’s most famous expedition began in 1852 when he set out to explore the Zambezi River and its surrounding regions. During this journey, he became the first European to witness the majestic Victoria Falls. Livingstone’s explorations also led to significant geographic discoveries, including the identification of Lake Malawi and the exploration of the Zambezi River system.

Livingstone’s explorations and writings captured the imagination of people around the world and earned him widespread acclaim as one of the greatest explorers and famous travellers of his time. His accounts of his travels, including books such as “Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa,” inspired subsequent generations of explorers and missionaries.

Livingstone died on May 1, 1873, in what is now Zambia, while on his final expedition to explore the sources of the Nile River.

traveller famous

Zheng He was a Chinese mariner, explorer, diplomat, and admiral during the Ming dynasty. He is best known for his extensive maritime voyages in the early 15th century, which took place decades before the famous European Age of Discovery.

Zheng He’s voyages were remarkable for their scale and reach. He led a series of expeditions from China to various parts of Asia and Africa, commanding a vast fleet of ships that included massive treasure ships, some of which were reported to be several times larger than the European ships of the time.

Zheng He’s expeditions visited countries and regions such as Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East, and the east coast of Africa. These voyages facilitated cultural exchange, trade, and diplomacy, with Zheng He presenting gifts from the Ming emperor to local rulers and receiving tribute in return.

Amelia Earhart

traveller famous

Amelia Earhart was an American aviator and pioneering woman in the field of aviation. Born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas, Earhart developed an early interest in flying and became one of the most famous female pilots and travellers of her time.

Earhart set numerous aviation records during her career. In 1928, she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, accomplishing the feat in her single-engine Lockheed Vega. This flight propelled her to international fame and established her as a symbol of women’s advancement in aviation.

In 1932, Earhart made history again by becoming the first woman to fly solo nonstop across the Atlantic, replicating Charles Lindbergh’s famous feat from five years earlier. She flew from Newfoundland to Ireland in approximately 15 hours.

One of Earhart’s most ambitious goals was to circumnavigate the globe. In 1937, she embarked on an attempt to fly around the world along the equator. However, tragically, Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean during the final leg of their journey.

Despite extensive search efforts, their fate remains one of the greatest mysteries in aviation history.

Christopher Columbus

traveller famous

Christopher Columbus, born in the Republic of Genoa (in present-day Italy) in 1451, was an Italian explorer whose voyages across the Atlantic Ocean paved the way for European exploration and colonization of the Americas. Columbus made his first voyage in 1492 under the sponsorship of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain, Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.

Columbus’s initial goal was to find a westward route to Asia, particularly to India and the lucrative spice trade. However, he instead encountered the islands of the Caribbean, landing on an island he named San Salvador (though the indigenous Taíno people called it Guanahani). Believing he had reached the East Indies, Columbus referred to the indigenous people he encountered as “Indians.”

Over the next several years, Columbus made three more voyages to the Caribbean and explored various islands, including Hispaniola (present-day Haiti and the Dominican Republic), Cuba, and Jamaica. His voyages initiated widespread European contact with the Americas and marked the beginning of the European colonization of the New World.

Columbus’s voyages had significant and far-reaching consequences, including the exchange of plants, animals, diseases, and cultures between the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. While his expeditions were celebrated in Europe, they also led to the colonization, exploitation, and displacement of indigenous peoples, as well as the transatlantic slave trade.

Today, Christopher Columbus is a controversial figure, with his legacy debated in terms of his role in history and his impact on indigenous populations. While some view him as a courageous explorer who initiated global connections, others criticize him for his treatment of indigenous peoples and the lasting negative effects of European colonization in the Americas.

Ferdinand Magellan

traveller famous

Ferdinand Magellan was a Portuguese explorer who is best known for leading the first expedition to circumnavigate the globe. He was born around 1480 in Sabrosa, Portugal, and he served as a navigator and explorer for the Portuguese crown before offering his services to the Spanish crown.

In 1519, Magellan set sail from Spain with a fleet of five ships and around 270 men, aiming to find a western sea route to the Spice Islands (the Moluccas) in the East Indies. On September 20, 1519, they departed from Sanlúcar de Barrameda, Spain, and after a long and perilous journey across the Atlantic, they reached the coast of South America.

Magellan navigated through the treacherous waters of what is now known as the Strait of Magellan, which connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans at the southern tip of South America.

After passing through the strait, Magellan and his crew sailed across the vast Pacific Ocean, enduring severe hardships such as starvation, scurvy, and storms. They reached the Mariana Islands and the Philippines, where Magellan was killed in a skirmish with local inhabitants on April 27, 1521.

Magellan’s expedition was a landmark achievement in the history of exploration, proving that the Earth was indeed round and demonstrating the vast extent of the Pacific Ocean.

Ernest Shackleton

traveller famous

Sir Ernest Shackleton was a renowned British explorer who led several expeditions to Antarctica during the early 20th century. He is best known for his heroic leadership and remarkable survival during the ill-fated Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917.

Born on February 15, 1874, in County Kildare, Ireland, Shackleton began his career as a seaman and later became involved in Antarctic exploration.

Shackleton’s most famous expedition, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, aimed to make the first land crossing of the Antarctic continent. The expedition, launched in 1914 aboard the ship Endurance, encountered numerous hardships, including being trapped in pack ice in the Weddell Sea.

Despite the loss of their ship, Shackleton and his crew managed to survive for over a year on the ice before finally making a daring escape in small lifeboats to Elephant Island.

Realizing that rescue was unlikely on Elephant Island, Shackleton embarked on an epic voyage with a small crew in an open boat, the James Caird, across 800 miles of treacherous seas to reach South Georgia Island. After successfully reaching South Georgia, Shackleton and his companions completed a hazardous overland journey to a whaling station, eventually rescuing the remaining men on Elephant Island.

Miraculously, Shackleton’s leadership and determination ensured the survival of all the members of the expedition, despite enduring extreme cold, hunger, and danger. Their remarkable tale of endurance and perseverance has become one of the most celebrated stories in the annals of exploration.

Following his Antarctic expeditions, Shackleton continued to pursue various ventures, including further attempts at Antarctic exploration. However, he died of a heart attack on January 5, 1922, while on an expedition to Antarctica.

Xuanzang (Hsüan-tsang)

traveller famous

Xuanzang, also known as Hsüan-Tsang, was a Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, and traveller who lived during the Tang Dynasty. He is renowned for his legendary journey to India in the 7th century AD, during which he travelled overland across Central Asia to study Buddhism and collect Buddhist scriptures.

Born in 602 AD in what is now Henan Province, China, Xuanzang became a Buddhist monk at a young age and dedicated himself to the study of Buddhist scriptures and philosophy. Despite government restrictions on travel abroad, Xuanzang was determined to visit India, the birthplace of Buddhism, to deepen his understanding of the religion and to obtain authentic Buddhist scriptures that were not available in China.

In 629 AD, Xuanzang set out on his epic journey to India. He travelled overland through treacherous terrain, across deserts and mountains, encountering numerous hardships and dangers along the way. Despite these challenges, Xuanzang persevered, driven by his unwavering faith and determination.

During his 17-year pilgrimage, Xuanzang visited many Buddhist monasteries, universities, and sacred sites in India, studying with renowned Buddhist masters and scholars. He also collected thousands of Buddhist scriptures, which he later brought back to China.

Upon his return to China in 645 AD, Xuanzang was hailed as a hero and a scholar. He spent the rest of his life translating the scriptures he had collected into Chinese and sharing his knowledge and insights with others. His translations played a crucial role in the spread of Buddhism in China and had a profound influence on Chinese culture and philosophy.

Xuanzang’s extraordinary journey and his contributions to Buddhist scholarship have made him a legendary figure in Chinese history and in the history of Buddhism. His life and adventures have been immortalized in literature, art, and folklore, and he remains a revered figure in Buddhist tradition.

Isabella Bird

Isabella Bird was a 19th-century British explorer, writer, photographer, and naturalist. Born on October 15, 1831, in England, she defied the societal norms of her time by embarking on extensive travels, often alone, to various remote and challenging regions of the world.

Bird’s first major journey took her to North America in 1854, where she travelled extensively throughout the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains. Her experiences during this trip were chronicled in her book “The Englishwoman in America,” published in 1856.

Throughout her life, Bird continued to embark on remarkable journeys. She explored the Hawaiian Islands, Canada, Japan, India, Persia (now Iran), Kurdistan, Tibet, China, and many other regions. Her travels were not only adventurous but also pioneering, as she often ventured into areas that were little known to Westerners at the time.

Bird was an avid writer, and she published numerous books and articles based on her travels. Her writings were highly acclaimed for their vivid descriptions of landscapes, cultures, and people.

Isabella Bird’s adventurous spirit, keen observations, and literary talents have earned her a lasting legacy as one of the most remarkable female explorers of the 19th century. Her works continue to inspire travellers and readers around the world, offering unique insights into the diverse cultures and landscapes of the places she visited.

Amerigo Vespucci

traveller famous

Amerigo Vespucci was an Italian explorer, navigator, and cartographer who played a significant role in the early exploration of the Americas. He was born in Florence, Italy, in 1454 or 1455, and he began his career working for the prominent Medici family in Florence.

Vespucci made several voyages to the New World between 1497 and 1504, primarily under the auspices of Spain and Portugal. While the details of his early voyages are somewhat unclear, Vespucci is best known for his accounts of his voyages, particularly his claim to have reached the mainland of the Americas before Columbus’s third voyage.

The German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller is credited with naming the continent after Vespucci, as he included the name “America” on his 1507 world map, the first to depict the Americas as separate from Asia.

While Vespucci did not make any significant discoveries or advancements in navigation himself, his writings and the use of his name for the continents had a lasting impact on European perceptions of the New World and its place in the world map.

traveller famous

James Cook was a British explorer, navigator, and cartographer who is widely regarded as one of the greatest explorers of all time. He was born on October 27, 1728, in England. Cook made significant contributions to the exploration and mapping of the Pacific Ocean and its islands during the 18th century.

Cook began his career in the British Royal Navy, rising through the ranks as a skilled seaman and navigator. He gained recognition for his precise cartography and his ability to navigate difficult waters.

In 1768, Cook was appointed as commander of the HMS Endeavour and embarked on his first voyage, which was commissioned by the Royal Society and the British Admiralty, to observe the transit of Venus from Tahiti and to explore the South Pacific.

During this voyage, Cook and his crew made extensive explorations of the South Pacific, including the mapping of the eastern coast of Australia, which he named New South Wales. Cook’s meticulous charting and observations laid the groundwork for later British colonization of Australia. Cook’s expedition also included the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of New Zealand.

Cook went on to make two more major voyages of exploration in the Pacific. His second voyage, from 1772 to 1775, aimed to locate the hypothetical southern continent of Terra Australis and further explore the Pacific. During this expedition, Cook became the first person to cross the Antarctic Circle.

On his third voyage, from 1776 to 1779, Cook attempted to find a northwest passage between the Pacific and the Atlantic. Although he did not succeed in finding the passage, he made significant discoveries in the Pacific Northwest region of North America, including the Hawaiian Islands.

Nellie Bly, born on May 5, 1864, was an American journalist, writer, and pioneering investigative reporter. She is best known for her record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days.

In 1889, Bly embarked on her most famous adventure: a solo journey around the world inspired by Jules Verne’s novel “Around the World in Eighty Days.” She travelled by steamship, train, and other means of transportation, completing the journey in just 72 days, a record at the time. Her trip captivated the public’s imagination and solidified her reputation as one of the most famous travellers in history.

Throughout her career, Bly wrote about social issues, women’s rights, and travel. She worked for various newspapers and magazines and authored several books, including “Ten Days in a Madhouse” and “Around the World in Seventy-Two Days.”

Ernest Hemingway

traveller famous

Ernest Hemingway, the acclaimed American novelist and short story writer, was also an avid traveller who drew inspiration from his journeys around the world. Throughout his life, Hemingway travelled extensively, often immersing himself in the cultures and landscapes of the places he visited.

Some of his notable travel experiences include:

  • Paris, France: Hemingway spent much of the 1920s living in Paris, where he was part of the expatriate community of writers and artists known as the “Lost Generation.” His experiences in Paris, particularly in the bohemian neighbourhoods of Montparnasse and the Left Bank, would later influence his writing, including his novel “The Sun Also Rises.”
  • Spain: Hemingway was deeply influenced by his experiences during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), where he worked as a war correspondent. He spent time in Madrid and other cities, witnessing the conflict firsthand and drawing inspiration for his novel “For Whom the Bell Tolls,” which is set during the war.
  • Key West, Florida: Hemingway lived in Key West during the 1930s and 1940s, where he wrote some of his most famous works, including “A Farewell to Arms” and “To Have and Have Not.” His house in Key West, now a museum, is a popular tourist attraction.
  • Africa: Hemingway embarked on several safaris in Africa during the 1930s and 1950s, where he hunted big game and drew inspiration for his short stories “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” and “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber.”
  • Cuba: Hemingway had a deep connection to Cuba, where he lived for many years and wrote several of his major works, including “The Old Man and the Sea.” His home in Cuba, Finca Vigia, is preserved as a museum and is a popular tourist destination.

Hemingway’s travels greatly influenced his writing, and his experiences in different parts of the world are reflected in the settings, characters, and themes of his novels and short stories. His adventurous spirit and love of travel are an integral part of his legacy as one of the greatest writers and famous travellers of the 20th century.

Ok, these last two aren’t in “history” as they’re still going even in their late age…

Ranulph Fiennes

Sir Ranulph Fiennes , born on March 7, 1944, is a British explorer, adventurer, and author known for his daring expeditions and record-breaking achievements in extreme environments around the world. He is often described as one of the greatest living explorers.

Fiennes has undertaken numerous expeditions throughout his career, often pushing the limits of human endurance and overcoming immense challenges.

In the Transglobe Expedition (1979–1982) Fiennes led the first circumnavigation of the Earth along its polar axis, traversing both the Arctic and Antarctic regions. The expedition covered over 52,000 miles and took over three years to complete, making it one of the most ambitious polar expeditions in history.

First to reach both Poles by surface travel: Fiennes became the first person to reach both the North and South Poles by surface travel when he reached the South Pole in 1982 and the North Pole in 1986.

In addition to his exploration endeavours, Fiennes is also a prolific author, having written numerous books about his adventures and experiences.

Fiennes continues to be actively involved in exploration and adventure, inspiring others to push their limits and explore the unknown. His legacy as one of the world’s greatest explorers is firmly established, and his adventures continue to captivate and inspire people around the globe.

Michael Palin

traveller famous

I’m going to end this list with one of my favourite modern-day travellers, Michael Palin . I have loved his TV travel shows for decades now. Michael Palin is a British comedian, actor, writer, and television presenter known for his travels around the world documented in various television series and books.

Palin’s travel adventures began with the groundbreaking television series “Around the World in 80 Days,” which aired in 1989. In this series, Palin attempted to circumnavigate the globe without flying, following in the footsteps of Phileas Fogg from Jules Verne’s novel. The journey took him through Europe, the Middle East, Asia, North America, and back to Europe, and it was documented in a book of the same name.

Following the success of “Around the World in 80 Days,” Palin continued to travel and document his journeys in subsequent television series and books, including:

  • “Pole to Pole” (1992): In this series, Palin travelled from the North Pole to the South Pole, passing through Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and the Americas.
  • “Full Circle with Michael Palin” (1997): Palin embarked on a journey around the Pacific Rim, travelling through countries such as Russia, Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, Australia, and Chile.
  • “Michael Palin’s Hemingway Adventure” (1999): Palin retraced the footsteps of the American writer Ernest Hemingway, visiting places significant to Hemingway’s life and work in Europe, Africa, and the Americas.
  • “Michael Palin’s Sahara” (2002): Palin explored the diverse cultures and landscapes of the Sahara Desert, travelling through countries such as Morocco, Algeria, Niger, and Mali.
  • “Himalaya with Michael Palin” (2004): Palin journeyed through the Himalayas, from Pakistan and India to Nepal, Bhutan, Tibet, and China, exploring the mountains, cultures, and people of the region.

Palin’s travel adventures have inspired and entertained audiences around the world, making him one of the world’s most beloved travel presenters and one of the most famous travellers of them all.

The legacies of these famous travellers endure as testaments to the indomitable human spirit and the insatiable thirst for discovery. Their courage, resilience, and insatiable curiosity have left an indelible mark on history, shaping our understanding of the world and inspiring future generations to venture beyond the known horizon.

These are just a few examples, and countless other explorers and travellers have made significant contributions to our understanding of the world through their journeys and discoveries.

For a look at another well-known modern traveller have a look at my article about a good friend of mine who is regarded as one of the most travelled man in the world today.

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10 Most Legendary (And Infamous) Travelers In History

traveller famous

“If you’re twenty-two, physically fit, hungry to learn and be better, I urge you to travel – as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to. Find out how other people live and eat and cook. Learn from them – wherever you go.”

– anthony bourdain.

At Elevated Trips we hold in high esteem the spirit of adventure and exploration as we seek out remote destinations that few foreigners have ever been to.  Here are 10 of the greatest explorers in the world to inspire your own travels to get off the beaten path and to forge new roads.

Fridtjof Nansen

traveller famous

Fridtjof Nansen was the first man to cross Greenland’s ice cap. He also sailed farther north in the Arctic Ocean than any man before him. That’s pretty awesome. He and a colleague even endured nine winter months in a hut made of stones and walrus hides, surviving solely off polar bears and walruses. Nansen explored the great white north and had an asteroid named after him.

Christopher Colombus

traveller famous

Here’s a guy who had no idea where he was when he landed so assumed he was in India, enslaved a population (for which he admitted to feelings of remorse later in life), and brought a host of terrible diseases to an entire hemisphere (he got syphilis from the native people, in return). Colombus showed Europeans there was a new world out there and ushered in a new age of European exploration.

Ibn Battuta

traveller famous

Ibn Battuta was a great Muslim explorer who traveled more than 120,000 kilometers through regions that, today, comprise 44 countries — from Italy to Indonesia, Timbuktu to Shanghai. He was mugged, attacked by pirates, held hostage, and once hid in a swamp. His travel writings provide a rare perspective on the 14th-century medieval empire of Mali (from which not many records survive).

traveller famous

Xuanzang was a Chinese Buddhist monk, intrepid traveler, and translator who documented the interaction between China and India in the early Tang Dynasty. He became famous for his 17-year overland journey to India, on which he was often ambushed by bandits, nearly died of thirst, and survived an avalanche.

Lewis and Clark

traveller famous

These two guys lead an expedition of 50 men to chart the northwestern region of the United States after the Louisiana Purchase and establish trade with the local populations. They set out in 1804 and didn’t return until 1806. They rode off into the unknown, were helped by the famous Sacagawea, and were the first Americans to set eyes on the Columbia River. They faced disease, hostile natives, and extreme weather conditions. They were true adventurers and scientists.

Ernest Hemingway

traveller famous

The manliest of manly travelers, Hemingway traveled extensively. His journeys inspired many of his greatest stories. He was a fisherman, hunter, soldier, and ardent drinker who lived in Paris, Cuba, and Spain. He was the most interesting man in the world before it was cool to be the most interesting man in the world.

traveller famous

This legendary Venetian set out with his father and uncle to explore Asia when he was just 17 years old. They came back 24 years later after traveling over 15,000 miles. He’s inspired generations of travelers with tales that provide fascinating insight into Kublei Khan’s empire, the Far East, the silk road, and China.

Ernest Shackleton

traveller famous

Antarctica’s most famous explorer (though Roald Amundsen was the first to reach it in 1911), Ernest Shackleton is synonymous with Antarctic exploration. He traversed the continent many times and is most famous for the 1914 voyage that trapped his ship  Endurance  in ice for 10 months. Eventually, she was crushed and destroyed, and the crew was forced to abandon ship. After camping on the ice for five months, Shackleton made two open boat journeys, one of which—a treacherous 800-mile ocean crossing to South Georgia Island—is now considered among the greatest voyages in history. Trekking across the mountains of South Georgia, Shackleton reached the island’s remote whaling station, organized a rescue team, and saved all the men he had left behind. That’s badass.

Neil Armstrong

traveller famous

The first man to set foot on the moon. That pretty much means he wins. He was a modern adventurer who traveled to the moon (no easy feat) and took one giant leap for mankind. Neil Armstrong is living proof that when we put our mind to it, there’s no place we can’t explore.

Freya Stark

traveller famous

In 1930, Freya Stark – who had also learned Persian – set out for Persia. The goal of her trip was to visit the Valleys of the Assassins, at the time still unexplored by Europeans, and carry out geographical and archeological studies. The Assassins were fanatical followers of a sect belonging to Shiite Islam, who used religious reasons to justify killing their enemies. They were said to enjoy hashish, which is reflected in the name “hashshashun,” or hashish-smoker. French crusaders derived the word “assassin” from the word “Hashshashun”, which came to mean “murderer” in Romance languages. The reign of the Assassins began in the 11th century and ended in the 13th century after the Mongol conquest.

On the back of a mule, equipped with a camp bed and a mosquito net, and accompanied by a local guide, Freya Stark rode to the valleys near Alamut (= ruins of a mountain fortress castle near the Alamut River), which had not yet been recorded on her map. Malaria, a weak heart, dengue fever, and dysentery plagued her, but she continued her trip and her studies. Back in Baghdad, she received much recognition from the colonial circles; overnight she had gained a reputation as an explorer and scholar to be taken seriously.

And here are some inspiring quotes to take you further in your travels:

“Traveling – it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller.”               – Ibn Battuta

“We travel, some of us forever, to seek other states, other lives, other souls.”         -Anaïs Nin “You can shake the sand from your shoes, but it will never leave your soul.”

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10 Most Legendary (And Infamous) Travelers In History

  • https://thoughtcatalog.com/?p=282238

Fridtjof Nansen

Fridtjof Nansen was the first man to cross Greenland’s ice cap. He also sailed farther north in the Arctic Ocean than any man before him. That’s pretty awesome. He and a colleague even endured nine winter months in a hut made of stones and walrus hides, surviving solely off polar bears and walruses. Nansen explored the great white north and had an asteroid named after him.

Christopher Colombus

Here’s a guy who had no idea where he was when he landed so assumed he was in India, enslaved a population (for which he admitted to feelings of remorse later in life), and brought a host of terrible diseases to an entire hemisphere (he got syphilis from the native people, in return). Colombus showed Europeans there was a new world out there, and ushered in a new age of European exploration.

Ibn Battuta

Ibn Battuta was a great Muslim explorer who travelled more than 120,000 kilometers through regions that, today, comprise 44 countries — from Italy to Indonesia, Timbuktu to Shanghai. He was mugged, attacked by pirates, held hostage, and once hid in a swamp. His travel writings provide a rare perspective on the 14th century medieval empire of Mali (from which not many records survive).

Xuanzang was a Chinese Buddhist monk, intrepid traveler, and translator who documented the interaction between China and India in the early Tang Dynasty. He became famous for his 17-year overland journey to India, on which he was often ambushed by bandits, nearly died of thirst, and survived an avalanche.

Lewis and Clark

These two guys lead an expedition of 50 men to chart the northwestern region of the United States after the Louisiana Purchase and establish trade with the local populations. They set out in 1804 and didn’t return until 1806. They rode off into the unknown, were helped by the famous Sacagawea, and were the first Americans to set eyes on the Columbia River. They faced disease, hostile natives, and extreme weather conditions. They were true adventurers and scientists.

Ernest Hemingway

The manliest of manly travelers, Hemingway traveled extensively. His journeys inspired many of his greatest stories. He was a fisherman, hunter, soldier, and ardent drinker who lived in Paris, Cuba, and Spain. He was the most interesting man in the world before it was cool to be the most interesting man in the world.

This legendary Venetian set out with his father and uncle to explore Asia when he was just 17 years old. They came back 24 years later after traveling over 15,000 miles. He’s inspired generations of travelers with tales that provide fascinating insight into Kublei Khan’s empire, the Far East, the silk road, and China.

Ernest Shackleton

Antarctica’s most famous explorer (though Roald Amundsen was the first to reach it in 1911), Ernest Shackleton is synonymous with Antarctic exploration. He traversed the continent many times and is most famous for the 1914 voyage that trapped his ship Endurance in ice for 10 months. Eventually she was crushed and destroyed, and the crew was forced to abandon ship. After camping on the ice for five months, Shackleton made two open boat journeys, one of which—a treacherous 800-mile ocean crossing to South Georgia Island—is now considered among the greatest voyages in history. Trekking across the mountains of South Georgia, Shackleton reached the island’s remote whaling station, organized a rescue team, and saved all the men he had left behind. That’s badass.

Neil Armstrong

First man to set foot on the moon. That pretty much means he wins. He was a modern adventurer who traveled to the moon (no easy feat) and took one giant leap for mankind. Neil Armstrong is living proof that when we put our mind to it, there’s no place we can’t explore.

Freya Stark

Matthew kepnes.

Budget travel expert, author of “How to Travel the World on $50 a Day” at Nomadic Matt .

Keep up with Matthew on Twitter and nomadicmatt.com

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The 10 greatest travellers of all time

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Just who is the world's greatest traveller? That is the question posed by Wanderlust magazine. While there is some consensus about the greatest movie ever (Citizen Kane) and best pop record (Bohemian Rhapsody), opinion is divided on the top explorer. In a bid to discover the Orson Welles/Freddie Mercury of the travel world - and provoke a bit of healthy debate - Wanderlust asked a selection of experts to pick the person who they believe has most changed the way we travel. This is the final top 10, counting down to the best traveller of all time. But do you agree? Please e-mail [email protected], and we will compare notes with the readers of Wanderlust.

10 APHRA BEHN (1640-1689)

First Englishwoman to make a living by the pen; possibly the world's greatest armchair traveller

Nominated by Dea Birkett, travel writer: "Aphra Behn was groundbreaking, claiming to have sailed to Suriname in the 1660s. Yet 300 years after writing Oroonoko, her powerful anti-slavery novel set in Suriname, we still don't know if she went to South America or not. She started the tradition of European travellers grossly exaggerating and lying about what they'd done. We've been fictionalising ever since."

Travelling style: mysterious, incognito - often travelled as a spy, and in the 17th-century equivalent of economy class.

Places visited: Suriname (probably), Antwerp, the Netherlands. Behn's plays suggest knowledge of Italy - though this may be the fruit of her stupendous imagination.

Hardships suffered: Rumour suggests she lost family members in Suriname and was once shipwrecked.

Changed-the-world rating: Helped to invent the English novel and the travel memoir. Oroonoko is fictional, one of the first great exotic travel narratives and an indictment of slavery. An unusual mix today, this must have seemed outlandish 300 years ago.

9 MICHAEL PALIN (1943-)

Affable Python and actor who went from spoofing Alan Whicker to replacing him as TV's foremost traveller

Nominated by Charlotte Hindle, Lonely Planet author: "He's done more than anyone else to bring the world into everyone's living room."

Travelling style: Intrepid, good-humoured Englishman abroad, self-confessed dromomaniac - one who suffers from the compulsive urge to travel.

Places visited: Around the world in 80 days, pole to pole, full circle, across the Sahara and through the Himalaya.

Hardships suffered: Cracked ribs, altitude sickness, getting a cut-throat shave from a blind barber, being mistaken for Eric Idle, having his car rocked by an angry mob.

Changed-the-world rating: The surges in bookings that follow his televised travels are known as the "Palin effect". Travel on TV once meant Judith Chalmers wishing you were there; Palin turned travel into a prime-time attraction and made the world a more exciting, accessible, place.

8 YURI GAGARIN (1934-1968)

Starman - the first man in space - who became the man who fell to earth, dying in a crash on a routine flight

Nominated by Mark Ellingham, Rough Guide's founder: "He took the greatest leap into the unknown since Columbus - or at least since Laika, Sputnik 2's dog."

Travelling style: Focused and fearless. On 12 April 1961 Yuri was blasted into space in crude terms - in a seat on top of a tin can, which was itself on top of a bomb.

Places visited: Around the Earth and 315km above it.

Hardships suffered: In training he withstood 13Gs of force in the centrifuge and sat in a dark, silent room for 24 hours; being grounded after his historic flight drove him to drink.

Changed-the-world rating: Fuelled the space race. With space tourism still somewhere between a prophecy and a joke, we haven't seen the full impact of his heroism.

7 FRIDTJOF NANSEN (1861-1930)

Skier, oceanographer, humanitarian, godfather of polar exploration; has an asteroid named after him

Nominated by Pen Hadow, explorer: "Nansen was the first to cross Greenland's ice cap and the Arctic Ocean, and sailed further north than man had been before."

Travelling style: Brave but not reckless - he never lost a single man nor major piece of equipment.

Places visited: Skied across Norway, crossed Greenland and travelled 255km further north than any man had been.

Hardships suffered: Endured nine winter months with a colleague in a hut made of stones and walrus hides in Franz Josef Land, eating polar bear and walrus.

Changed-the-world rating: Technologically revolutionised polar exploration, inventing a cooker and water bottle still used today.

6 CHARLES DARWIN (1809-1882)

Founder of evolutionary theory

Nominated by William Gray, TV presenter and writer: "Darwin discovered many species, while his observations during his voyage on the Beagle formed the bedrock of his theory of evolution through natural selection."

Travelling style: Argumentative, determined, blessed with an inexhaustible curiosity.

Places visited: Across the Atlantic, Pacific, both coasts of South America, remote islands such as the Galapagos and Tahiti; he also rode across the Argentinian plains, hiked up mountains and trekked through the Peruvian desert.

Hardships suffered: Stomach pains, vomiting, heart palpitations, boils, storms and revolution in Buenos Aires.

Changed-the-world rating: He changed the way we think.

5 CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS (1451-1506)

The most controversial explorer in history

Nominated by Bill Bryson: "Christopher Columbus didn't actually discover America, but he opened the door to the European exploration of two mighty continents."

Travelling style: Visionary, fearless, neurotic, ruthless. Stopped travelling only when mortally ill.

Places visited: Four voyages across the Atlantic, around the Mediterranean and, possibly, to Iceland.

Hardships suffered: Arthritis, flu, temporary blindness, fever, bleeding eyes, malnutrition, insomnia.

Changed-the-world rating: "He was head of the horde that introduced yellow fever, dengue, malaria, smallpox, measles, diphtheria, typhoid and a few others to the Americas," says the explorer Dr Jane Wilson-Howarth. "In exchange, they brought back syphilis." Columbus paved the way for Spain's global empire, genocidal conflict with the indigenous cultures, slavery and the European settlement of North America.

4 IBN BATTUTA (1304-1368 OR 1377)

Medieval geographer who made Marco Polo look like someone who ought to get out more

Susan Spano of the Los Angeles Times says: "His tale is a wild but true yarn that surpasses that of Marco Polo."

Travelling style: A charming freeloader, resilient, brave, a bit of a fussbudget and teller of tall tales.

Places visited: Travelled more than 120,000km, through regions that, today, comprise 44 countries, from Italy to Indonesia, Timbuktu to Shanghai.

Hardships suffered: Muggings, attacks by pirates, was held hostage, once hid in a swamp for a week without food.

Changed-the-world rating: He was the last great Muslim geographer. His work offers an unparalleled insight into the 14th-century Muslim world and a rare perspective on the medieval empire of Mali.

3 SIR RICHARD BURTON (1821-1890)

Diplomat, fencer and explorer; man of towering intellect

Nominated by John Gimlette, travel writer: "While others travelled to blow the family cash, for Sir Richard Burton it was all an exercise in comprehension. He constantly challenged convention, and left his readers gasping."

Travelling style: "Disloyal, waspish, foul-mouthed, scruffy, drunken and misogynistic, he was the worst of travelling companions," says Gimlette. But he was seldom short of courage, ideas or a word - he knew 30 languages and 60 sounds in the vocabulary of monkeys.

Places visited: India, Arabia, East Africa, Fernando Po, Brazil, Syria, the US West and Trieste.

Hardships suffered: A spear struck through his jaw, syphilis, malaria, rheumatic ophthalmia, attacked by bandits, smoked too much opium and was circumcised to make his disguise as a Muslim more convincing.

Changed-the-world rating: Burton may have been the first modern anthropologist, and he helped John Hanning Speke to discover the source of the Nile. His feat in becoming only the second European to visit Mecca, inspired countless explorers. His translation of the Arabian Nights opened up a mysterious - and still misunderstood - culture to the West.

2 XUANZANG (602-644 OR 664)

Chinese Buddhist monk who went on the mother of all pilgrimages and pioneered travel writing

Nominated by Michael Palin: "Xuanzang travelled alone on a pilgrimage to discover the origins of Buddhism. The scope, scale and significance of these travels for Chinese and Indian history have never been equalled."

Travelling style: "He was curious, courteous, determined, intelligent and courageous," says Palin.

Places visited: Xian, the deserts and mountains of western China, Afghanistan and Pakistan, all of India.

Hardships suffered: hunger strikes, often caught by bandits, nearly died of thirst, survived an avalanche.

Changed-the-world rating: "He left a priceless legacy in the record of his journeys and translations of Buddhist writings that might otherwise have been lost," says Palin.

1 CAPTAIN JAMES COOK (1728-1779)

Indefatigable explorer who had all the essential traveller's virtues - until he went a bit funny at the end

Nominated by Sara Wheeler, travel writer: "Captain Cook discovered more of the earth's surface than any other man and excelled as a scientist, cartographer and surveyor. He was bad-tempered - I like a touch of clay feet in a hero."

Travelling style: Precise - an excellent navigator, he always drew up accurate charts; indomitable - when his ship, the Endeavour, ran aground in the Coral Sea, he beached and repaired it; shrewd - he averted scurvy by forcing his crew to eat fruit and sauerkraut; open-minded - his notes show genuine interest in other cultures.

Places visited: He circumnavigated the globe twice, visited all seven continents and crossed the Arctic and Antarctic circles.

Hardships suffered: Sailed with Captain Bligh, recovered from biliary colic by eating stew made from a ship's dog; was clubbed to death in Hawaii.

Changed-the-world rating: By finding Australia and mapping New Zealand, Captain Cook essentially created the map of the Pacific we know today. He also anticipated ethnology and anthropology - and, arguably, independent travel. His aim to go "farther than any man has been before me but only as far as I think it possible for a man to go" is an inspiration to every traveller.

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History’s most famous explorers and their epic journeys

Clifton Wilkinson

Mar 31, 2020 • 6 min read

traveller famous

In a time before planes, credit cards and the internet, travel was often as dangerous as it was exciting. Yet for millennia those with a taste for adventure have given in to the human impulse to explore the world, to discover new cultures and pave the way for others. The roll call of great historical travelers includes the well known and the should-be-better known. Here are a select few, each of whom demonstrates that curiosity that keeps us exploring today.

An old map with a compass sitting on top

Zheng He and the "treasure voyages"

“Eventful” is an adjective that could easily apply to the lives of many well known travelers but it’s particularly apt for Zheng He. Born a Muslim, he was captured, castrated and converted by Chinese troops, before rising through the ranks of the Ming army to become a trusted adviser to Emperor Yongle. 

Made admiral in charge of the “treasure voyages” (seven sea trips designed to expand Chinese knowledge, trade and influence in the early 15th century), he headed west to Southeast Asia , India , the Arabian Peninsula and East Africa , employing diplomacy where possible and force where necessary to impress the locals.

Marco Polo on the Silk Road (and beyond)

When he left his home in Venice in 1271, Marco Polo, arguably the most famous traveler of all time, couldn’t have imagined he’d be away for 24 years. Driven as much by trade as by the travel bug (he came from a family of merchants), he followed the Silk Road to China (or Cathay as it was then known). There he became friends with the Mongol emperor Kublai Khan and embarked on a series of journeys as emissary of the khan, which he subsequently documented in the Book of the Marvels of the World , a bestseller at the time.

A black and white photo of four men and one woman

Gertrude Bell broke and created boundaries

Scholar, diplomat, empire-builder, mountaineer, traveler – if you thought we were about to talk about a man, you’d be mistaken. All these attributes and more belong to the Brit Gertrude Bell. Breaking into previously male-dominated areas of society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, she had already been stranded on a rope for some 53 hours while climbing in the Alps, circumnavigated the world twice and spent years exploring the Middle East before she was involved in drawing up the post-WW1 borders of Iraq, an area she knew well thanks to her love of archeology. 

A less controversial legacy of her time in the region is the Iraq Museum, a repository of objects from the country’s extraordinarily long past which she helped create shortly before her death in 1926.

Ibn Battuta's 30-year trip

Hailing from Morocco , Ibn Battuta would, like his near contemporary Marco Polo, not see his home for many decades once he headed off on his travels. Deciding to go on pilgrimage to Mecca, he left his family and friends in Tangier in 1324, following the North African coast in the company of camel caravans (for safety) and completing his hajj in 1326. 

Influenced by a holy man’s prophecy saying he would travel the earth, he then continued east – and south and north and west, crossing Spain, India, Persia, China, Southeast Asia and many more destinations on his wishlist. Sometimes treated as an honored guest by those he encountered, other times as a hostage, as well as exploring new places he also found time to marry (and divorce) an astonishing ten times during his trip, before finally returning home for good (and presumably a rest) in 1354.

Percy Fawcett and the lost city of Z

Once British soldier and explorer Percy Fawcett got the idea of a mysterious civilization in the Brazilian Amazon into his head, he couldn’t shake it and his obsession with "the lost city of Z" would lead to his death. A respected cartographer, he was sent to Brazil’s Mato Grosso region in 1906 to help determine the country’s border with Bolivia. 

On subsequent visits he became fascinated by rumors of a former culture, with grand architecture, hidden somewhere in the area’s vast jungles. In April 1925 he set out to find it with his son and his son’s best friend. By the end of May they had disappeared. Whether they were killed by a local tribe or died of starvation is still unknown. But recent research has offered tantalizing evidence that a civilization just like the one Fawcett was looking for, did exist in the region and is known as Kuhikugu.

Interior of a wooden structure with a dirt floor and circular shields

Leif Erikson landed in North America

Centuries before Marco Polo and Zheng He set off on their expeditions, an intrepid Icelander decided to sail west from his home to see what he would find. It’s not surprising that travel was in Leif Erikson’s blood (his father, Erik the Red, was exiled from Iceland to Greenland), but he couldn’t have known, as he set sail around 1000 CE, that he would build the first European settlement in North America. 

Exactly where he created his community of Vinland is hotly debated – tradition has it in L'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland, Canada – but history, and a large, west-facing statue of him outside Reykjavík’s Hallgrimskirkja church, will always remember his groundbreaking journeys.

Mansa Musa's economic impact

There aren’t many trips that can claim to have devastated local economies, but the pilgrimage to Mecca by Malian ruler Mansa Musa did just that. Like Ibn Battuta a year or two earlier, Musa traveled across northern Africa on his hajj, but with an entourage whose stats defy belief: 60,000 people, including 12,000 slaves and heralds, plus 100 elephants and 80 camels carrying thousands of pounds of gold which was lavishly dispensed to people en route – Mali was the world’s main gold producer at the time making Musa possibly the richest man who has ever lived. His generosity proved disastrous, though, as so much gold flooded the market that its value dropped and negatively impacted local economies for around a decade after his trip.

Nellie Bly circumnavigated the world in 72 days

“No one but a man can do this!” scoffed her editor when journalist Nellie Bly suggested a round-the-world trip in 80 days, emulating the fictional Phileas Fogg. The year was 1889 and convention simply didn’t allow a solo female traveler to do this kind of thing, but, as with Gertrude Bell, “convention-defying” could have been Nellie Bly’s middle name (actually her real name was Elizabeth Jane Cochran; Nellie Bly was her pseudonym).

Having already earned her credentials with an exposé on the appalling treatment of women in New York’s mental asylums, she packed her bags (very lightly), hid her money in a small pouch under her clothes, and boarded the steamship Augusta Victoria . Crossing Europe , South Asia, Japan and the US, and having several adventures and close calls along the way, she returned to a rapturous welcome on January 25, 1890 – 72 days after setting off. Beat that, Phileas!

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15 famous explorers whose travels put yours to shame

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Joanne Owen

written by Joanne Owen

updated 26.10.2022

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Being well-travelled is one thing. Being an explorer is quite another. From Marco Polo’s Silk Road expedition to Nellie Bly’s epic 1889 voyage around-the-world-in-72-days, these 15 famous world explorers sure knew how to make the most of their time on earth. What’s more, these famous explorers' names might just provide inspiration for places to visit during your own trip of a lifetime. 

  • 1. Marco Polo (1254 -1324)
  • 2. Abubakari II (c.1280 - c.1337)

3. Christopher Columbus - undoubtedly one of the most famous world explorers (1451 -1506)

4. amerigo vespucci (1454 -1512).

  • 5. Ferdinand Magellan (1480 - 1521)

6. Charles Darwin (1809 -1882)

  • 7. Dr David Livingstone (1813 - 1873)

8. Isabella Bird (1831 - 1904)

  • 9. Nellie Bly (1864 - 1922)
  • 10. Freya Stark (1893 - 1993)
  • 11. Matthew Henson (1866 –1955)
  • 12. Jacques Cousteau (1910 -1997)

13. Ranulph Fiennes (1944 - present)

14. fran sandham (1965 - present), 15. mario rigby (1985 - present).

And we’re talking ultimate  bucket list experiences . It's important to note, though, that many famous explorers in history aren’t without their controversies due to the imperialist notion of Europeans “discovering” long-settled places. In the piece that follows we've included a few lesser-known voyagers among the more famous explorer names, along with trailblazers making history today.

This article is inspired by our Rough Guides guidebooks — your essential guides for travelling the world.

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Discover Andalusia, starting with the cultural city of Seville, then on to Córdoba and Granada, home of the stunning Alhambra Palace. Next you'll visit Granada and the Albayzin Arab quarter, then enjoy a stunning hot-air balloon ride, before ending your trip with a luxury boat trip from Marbella!

 1. Marco Polo (1254 -1324)

Famed for his travels along the  Silk Road , thirteenth-century Venetian Marco Polo is unquestionably one of the world’s most famous historical explorers.

One of the first European explorers to visit  China , he left Venice in 1271 and crossed the Middle East with his family. They traversed Jerusalem, Afghanistan and the Gobi Desert for three years on their way to China. There they visited Kublai Khan, the Mongol emperor. Polo stayed in China for 17 years, and only around 1292 - after escorting a Mongol princess to Iran - did he make the return journey to  Venice  via  Istanbul .

Marco Polo portrait on Italian 1000 Lire banknote

Marco Polo's portrait on the Italian 1000 lira banknote © Shutterstock

If you fancy following in Marco Polo’s fearless footsteps, you could explore our customisable tailor-made trips. Among them an exploration of some of Uzbekistan’s unique cultural highlights and inspirational itineraries around China . But fear not if you’re looking for closer to home adventures. You could always discover more about the man on a  Venetian land and water tour  that includes a visit to his birthplace.

2. Abubakari II (c.1280 - c.1337) 

Abubakari II might not be one of the most famous explorer names, but some scholars argue that he deserves a prominent place alongside them. Thought to have been the ninth mansa (sultan or emperor) of West Africa’s Mali Empire, Abubakari II abdicated to undertake an exploratory ocean voyage.

According to an account recorded by the Arab historian Ibn Fadlallah al-Umari or al-Umari, Abubakari II “did not believe that it was impossible to reach the extremity of the ocean.” So, “he equipped two hundred boats full of men, like many others full of gold, water and victuals sufficient enough for several years.” It’s said that Abubakari II didn’t return from this voyage, and a few scholars have posited the view that he travelled to the New World.

Having said that, the jury’s still out, with other academics arguing that there’s simply not enough evidence - for the time being at least. One thing’s for sure, on-going research and debates around Abubakari II are important reminders of the need to keep an open mind when it comes to understanding the past. New discoveries about famous historical explorers are always possible, much like the possibilities envisaged by explorers themselves.

Africa vintage map Abraham Ortelius, circa 1570 © Shutterstock

Map of Africa by Abraham Ortelius, circa 1570 © Shutterstock

Undoubtedly one of the most famous explorers in history, Christopher Columbus was born in  Genoa  in 1451. From a young age his impulse to travel was strong - he went to sea as a teenager and made  Portugal  his base. Having failed to secure royal patronage for his planned “enterprise of the Indies” (to reach Asia by sailing west), he went to Spain .

After a time, he secured backing from King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella and on 3rd August 1492 he set sail across the Atlantic. Ten weeks later, land was sighted. But he was far from Asia. This land was, in fact, what later become known as the Bahamas.

After landing on other islands around the Caribbean  (devastating indigenous populations), Christopher Columbus returned to Spain. Having been made admiral of the Seven Seas and viceroy of the Indies, he undertook three further transatlantic voyages, never reaching the Asian lands he’d originally planned to find.

Landing of Columbus in 1492 © Shutterstock

Christopher Columbus — one of many famous explorers © Shutterstock

When visiting the Caribbean, be sure to check out museums that uncover Christopher Columbus from the perspective of those whose lives he impacted. The  Seville Great House  heritage site in St Ann’s,  Jamaica , for example, is home to an excellently curated history of the region. The exhibition covers the area and its peoples from the indigenous Taíno (who Columbus and his men abused and murdered in their thousands).

Alternatively, if you’re in Genoa, you could take a  guided tour of the city  to see where Christopher Columbus was born and learn more about its history back in his day.

Florence-born Amerigo Vespucci is another name that comes to mind when thinking of world famous explorers.

A merchant and navigator with a well-connected family (they counted the Medici’s among their friends), Vespucci relocated to  Seville  in 1492. Here he worked for Florentine merchant Gianotto Berardi, who invested huge sums of money in Columbus's first voyage. Berardi also won a potentially profitable contract to provision Columbus’s second fleet.

Statue of Amerigo Vespucci, on the facade of the Uffizi gallery, Florence © Shutterstock

Statue of Amerigo Vespucci on the facade of the Uffizi gallery, Florence © Shutterstock

As for Vespucci’s discoveries, considering that the Americas are named after him, the documentation is surprisingly scant. What is certain is that during the late 1490s he undertook two voyages to the New World. While another two trips have been alleged, the letter-based evidence is patchier, and the documents’ authorship is debated.

During these voyages he did, however, observe that the continent he was exploring was not part of Asia, as was believed at the time. He also explored the coast of modern-day  Brazil , including areas of the  Amazon  and Para Rivers. Strong currents put paid to any plans they may have had to explore deeper.

In 1502, during Vespucci’s second voyage, his fleet found a bay that they named  Rio de Janeiro  after the date - 1st January.

If you fancy following in Vespucci’s footsteps in South America, check-out our customisable Brazilian trip itineraries  for inspiration. Chances are, you’ll see more of this vast country than Vespucci did during his voyage.

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Inside the old Colosseum (Coliseum), Rome, Italy © Viacheslav Lopatin/Shutterstock

5. Ferdinand Magellan (1480 - 1521)

As famous historical explorers go, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan was no stranger to embracing the hazards that often went hand in hand with his profession. 

After an early life as a page to queen consort Eleanor and Manuel I in Lisbon , Magellan jumped ship and sailed on behalf of Spain. This came as a result of Magellan being accused of illegal trading. Manuel I refused to support of Magellan’s plan to find a new spice route by sailing west through South America to Indonesia and India.

Arrival in the Philippines of Ferdinand Magellan

Ferdinand Magellan's arrival in the Philippines © Shutterstock

Not one to be deterred, Magellan found favour with Charles V in Spain and secured the funds for a five-ship voyage that set off in 1519. His Spanish crew weren’t best pleased to be taking orders from a Portuguese captain, to say the least. In fact, they mutinied in present-day Argentina .

With one ship destroyed, and another making its way back to Spain, Portuguese explorer dealt with the mutineers (some were beheaded) and gained control of his reduced fleet. After navigating the treacherous channel connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans he and his sickly crew made landfall on the Micronesian island of Guam. There a missing small boat prompted them to kill some of the island’s indigenous people.

A month later, Magellan reached the Philippines . Since an enslaved crew member he’d bought before the voyage could speak the indigenous language, it seems this chap had circumnavigated the globe before Magellan. And Magellan didn’t make it the full way around either. After demanding that local people convert to Christianity, he was killed, leaving his crew to complete the round-the-world voyage without him.

Charles Darwin is undoubtedly one of the world’s most influential European famous explorers. In 1831, aged 22 and fresh out of Cambridge University, Darwin joined the crew of the HMS Beagle to survey the coast of South America.

Rebellion in Río de la Plata, fossils in Bahía Blanca, observations in the Andes and, of course, finches in the Galápagos turned his mind into “a chaos of delight”. Later it paved the way for one of the greatest theories in history: evolution.

Statue of Charles Robert Darwin in Natural History Museum, London

Statue of Charles Robert Darwin in Natural History Museum, London © Shutterstock

7. Dr David Livingstone (1813 - 1873) 

Missionary, abolitionist and explorer, Livingstone was vital in the mapping of the African interior. In 1852 he embarked on a four-year expedition to find a route from the upper Zambezi to the coast. Then, in 1855, he was the first European to see Victoria Falls and in May 1856 he became the first European to cross the width of southern Africa.

legendary meeting between Henry Morton Stanley (left) and David Livingstone in Africa in 1871 © Shutterstock

The legendary meeting between Henry Morton Stanley (left) and David Livingstone in Africa in 1871 © Shutterstock

Ten years later he set out, on what would be his final trip, to locate the source of the Nile. Uncontactable for several months, he was found by Henry Stanley, explorer and journalist, near Lake Tanganyika in 1871. It was here the famous phrase was coined: “Dr Livingstone I presume?”

If you want an unforgettable solo travel experience, perhaps our list of the best places to travel solo can help you decide on the best destination for you.

When it comes to famous world explorers' names, Isabella Bird probably doesn’t immediately spring to mind. Yet this fearless Yorkshire woman definitely deserves to be reckoned among the world’s famous historical explorers.

After a sickly childhood, her adventures began when her doctor advised that she take an overseas trip to improve her health. As a result, Isabella accompanied her cousins to America, on instruction from her clergyman father that she could remain away for as long as her £100 allowance lasted.

1885 Hotel porter, photography by Isabella Bird © Isabella Bird/Wikimedia Commons under  Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International

1885 hotel porter - Isabella Bird's celebrated photography © Isabella Bird/Wikimedia Commons under Creative Commons Attributio n

The letters Bird wrote home during this trip become the basis of her first book, “An Englishwomen in America”. Following the deaths of her parents, she continued to travel and write to support herself. Her most notable exploration are Hawaii, as described in her second book, “Six Months in the Sandwich Islands”, as they were then known.

Bird later rode 800 miles through the Rocky Mountains  (as desrcibed in “A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains”) and explored Asia (as recounted in “Unbeaten tracks in Japan”). She also studied medicine so she could travel as a missionary, and studied photography so she could document her travels.

Eternally defying the conventions of her day, she travelled to India at the age of 60. She later explored China and Korea, with her last book, “The Yangtze Valley and Beyond”, published in 1900.

9. Nellie Bly (1864 - 1922)

In 1888, at the age of 25, Nellie Bly set off to travel the world in 80 days, just like Jules Verne’s Phileas Fogg. Her trip took her from New York to London. Then onwards from Calais in France to Brindisi in Italy, Port Said in Egypt, Colombo in Sri Lanka, Penang in  Malaysia ,  Hong Kong ,  San Francisco  and finally back to New York City.

Bly actually completed the journey in 72 days, winning a bet struck with Verne himself. Of this achievement, she declared: “It's not so very much for a woman to do who has the pluck, energy and independence, which characterize many women in this day of push and get-there."

Nellie Bly © Shutterstock

Portrait of adventuress Nellie Bly © Shutterstock

Not only a trail-blazing, record-breaking traveller, Nellie Bly was also a pioneering investigative journalist. She reported on everything from the lives of impoverished working girls in Pittsburgh, to corruption and poor living conditions in Mexico . She also investigated the living conditions and treatment of patients in a New York insane asylum, even faking her own illness in order to be admitted to the asylum.

All that considered, Bly certainly merits a place at the table of famous explorers. And, while it goes without saying that she's a pretty impossible act to follow, if you fancy embarking on an epic solo voyage (or several) of your own, you might want to check out our list of tips for doing exactly that.

10. Freya Stark (1893 - 1993) 

Born in Paris to bohemian parents - a British father and Italian mother - Freya Stark studied Persian and Arabic at the University of London.

At the age of 30 she began her lifelong immersion in the Middle East some four years later when she caught a cargo ship to Beirut. This pivotal trip saw Stark travel widely through Syria in secret (at this time it was under French control). This trip paved the way for a future as one of the most esteemed, knowledgable and famous explorers of the Middle East.

Stamp print showing Dame Freya Madeline Stark © Shutterstock

Stamp created in honour of Dame Freya Madeline Stark © Shutterstock

In the coming years Stark trekked into western Iran’s wilderness, areas of which had never been visited by Westerners. In 1934 she voyaged down the Red Sea with the aim of reaching the ancient city of Shabwa, thought to have been the Queen of Sheba’s capital. Though illness curtailed this particular journey, Stark’s exploration of this region resulted in a clutch of seminal books. Later she was awarded with the Royal Geographical Society’s Founder's Gold Medal.

During WWII Stark worked for the British Ministry of Information in Yemen and Cairo, and later travelled extensively through Turkey . She made her last expedition in 1968 (a trip to Afghanistan at the age of 75), though she continued to travel well into her eighties.

11. Matthew Henson (1866 –1955)

As the first person to reach the top of the world, there’s no doubt that intrepid African-American Matthew Henson should be recognised as one of the world’s most famous historical explorers. 

Born in Maryland, where his parents were subjected to attacks from the Ku Klux Klan, Henson was orphaned as a child and set sail as a cabin boy at the tender age of twelve. Under the tutelage of the ship’s Captain Childs, Henson was educated and became an accomplished sailor. He voyaged China, Japan , Africa, and the Russian Arctic seas.

When Childs died, Henson though his seafaring days were over until he met Robert Peary, a US Naval officer and explorer.

Peary took Henson on to assist his next assignment - mapping the jungles of Nicaragua. During this trip, the men formed a lifelong bond. Henson went on to play a pivotal role in Peary’s exploration of the Arctic. He mastered the Inuit language and learned skills that were essential for their survival during their expedition to the North Pole in 1908-09 (Peary’s eighth attempt).

A stamp printed in USA shows Robert E Peary and Matthew Henson, circa 1986 © IgorGolovniov/Shutterstock

US stamp showing Robert E Peary and Matthew Henson © IgorGolovniov/Shutterstock

Peary was lauded as the first man to reach the North Pole. However, Henson’s account of the final push of this attempt, as recounted in his 1921 memoir “A Negro Explorer at the North Pole”, describes otherwise. Henson rode in the lead sledge, his footprints were first to make their mark at the North Pole, and it was Henson who planted the American flag.

In 1937 the inaccuracy of Peary being deemed the first man to make it to the North Pole was rectified when Henson was made an honorary member of the prestigious Explorers Club of New York. Then in 1946 the US Navy awarded him the same medal they’d issued to Peary. Henson was also later honoured by Presidents Truman and Eisenhower.

12. Jacques Cousteau (1910 -1997) 

In the field of underwater expeditions, famous historical explorers don’t come more well-known than Jacques Cousteau - the researcher, photographer, filmmaker and marine conservationist who co-invented the Aqua-Lung.

Cousteau’s early career in naval aviation was cut short by a car accident, and led to him following his love for the ocean. In the mid-to-late 1930s he worked for the French Navy’s information service, which saw him sent on missions to  Shanghai and Japan.

Jacques Cousteau copper statue in Mallejon promenade by the sea © Shutterstock

Jacques Cousteau statue in La Paz, Baja California Sur, northwest Mexico © Shutterstock

In 1943 Cousteau and engineer Emile Gagnan co-created the Aqua-Lung. This breathing apparatus revolutionised underwater exploration by making it possible to stay submerged for longer. A few years later, he showcased his first films, bringing the wonders of the ocean to a far wider audience. He also pioneered the field of underwater archaeological exploration.

Cousteau’s conservation achievements include making a key contribution to restricting commercial whaling, and leading a campaign against the French government’s plan to dump nuclear waste in the Mediterranean Sea.

Hailed as the world’s greatest living explorer by the Guinness Book of World Records, Ranulph Fiennes has led over fifteen gruelling expeditions in the past forty years. He is living proof that intrepid exploration still exists: he led the first hovercraft expedition up the Nile. Also, he was the first to circumnavigate the world along its polar axis – a feat of 52,000 miles, starting in the Antarctic and ending at the North Pole.

In 2003 he completed seven marathons, in seven days, on seven continents, and was the first British pensioner to climb Mount Everest, raising £6.2 million for charity.

Sir Ranulph Fiennes © Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Sir Ranulph Fiennes © Foreign and Commonwealth Office

In 1997, lecturer, author and former Rough Guides editor Fran Sandham threw caution to the wind and left his London life to walk 3000 miles across Africa. Remarkably, there was no big plan. There was no big sense of purpose beyond achieving that ambitious goal of traversing the continent in a spirit of adventure, on foot and alone - no sponsors, no strings, no support team. 

Skeleton Coast in Namibia. The shipwreck was stranded or grounded at the coastline of the Atlantic close to Swakopmund © gg-foto/Shutterstock

Namibia's Skeleton Coast, starting point of Fran Sandham's journey across Africa © Shutterstock

As recounted in  Traversa , Sandham’s boundlessly engaging account of his epic journey, he modelled his route on the Victorian-era "traversas" journeyed by the likes of Henry Morton Stanley and Dr David Livingstone.

Sandham's journey took almost a year. During the journey he was stricken with malaria, and the threat of lions and mines never left his mind. All this demonstrates the human impulse to set out and do things his own way. Traversa suffused in a spirit of joie de vivre, albeit brilliantly tempered by the author's endearing self-deprecating wit.

Modern-day adventurer  Mario Rigby  is surely set to become one of the world's most famous explorers. Born in Turks and Caicos, Rigby grew up in Germany and Canada, where a talent for athletics saw him pursuing a career as a personal trainer. It was an athletics competition in San Salvador that first inspired Rigby’s desire to explore more of the world, and ultimately led to his  Crossing Africa  expedition.

If you are inspired by Mario Rigbys adventures check our list of the world's best backpacking destinations.

Adventure Explorer Mario Rigby, Crossing Africa © Quantumtoastmedia/Wikimedia Commons under  Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International

Adventure explorer Mario Rigby, Crossing Africa © Quantumtoastmedia/Wikimedia Commons under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International

In November 2015 Rigby left Toronto for Cape Town from where his incredible adventure began. An astounding 12,000 km trek north through eight African countries by foot and kayak that saw him reach Cairo in 2018. Contracting malaria, and dodging bullets and wild dogs along the way, Rigby was driven to learn from the people he met along the way. He also committed to share their stories with authentic, respectful realism.

Also a powerful, inspirational advocate for eco-conscious travel, Rigby’s continued adventures help support a number of charities. Among them are the  Rainmaker Enterprise  in Sudan and Toronto-based  My Stand , a mentoring scheme for vulnerable young people.

If you prefer to plan and book your trips without any effort and hassle, use the expertise of our local travel experts to make sure your trip will be just like you dream it to be.

To find more inspiration for your future journeys check our Rough Guides guidebooks and find out all the information you need about your dream destination.

We may earn commission when you click on links in this article, but this doesn’t influence our editorial standards. We only recommend services that we genuinely believe will enhance your travel experiences.

Header image: map of Columbus's voyage © Shutterstock

Joanne is a Pembrokeshire-born writer with a passion for the nature, cultures and histories of the Caribbean region, especially Dominica. Also passionate about inspiring a love of adventure in young people, she’s the author of several books for children and young adults, hosts international writing workshops, and has written articles on the Caribbean and inspirational community initiatives for Rough Guides. Follow her @JoanneOwen on Twitter and @joanneowenwrites on Instagram.

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The Top Ten Most Influential Travel Books

Even before there were armchairs, voracious bookworms traveled the world just by reading

Tony Perrottet

Tony Perrottet

Contributing writer

Travel books

William H.H. Murray's guidebook to the Adirondacks “kindled a thousand camp fires and taught a thousand pens how to write of nature,” inspiring droves of American city-dwellers to venture into the wild and starting a back-to-nature movement that endures to this day. Of course, Murray's slender volume was part of a great literary tradition. For more than two millennia, travel books have had enormous influence on the way we have approached the world, transforming once-obscure areas into wildly popular destinations.

A detailed selection would fill a library. So what follows is a brazenly opinionated short-list of travel classics—some notorious, some barely remembered—that have inspired armchair travelers to venture out of their comfort zone and hit the road. 

1. Herodotus, Histories (c.440 BC)

Homer's Odyssey is often referred to as the first travel narrative, creating the archetypal story of a lone wanderer, Odysseus, on a voyage filled with mythic perils, from terrifying monsters like the Cyclops to seductive nymphs and ravishing sorceresses. As may be.  But the first real “travel writer,” as we would understand the term today, was the ancient Greek author Herodotus, who journeyed all over the eastern Mediterranean to research his monumental Histories. His vivid account of ancient Egypt, in particular, created an enduring image of that exotic land, as he “does the sights” from the pyramids to Luxor, even dealing with such classic travel tribulations as pushy guides and greedy souvenir vendors. His work inspired legions of other ancient travelers to explore this magical, haunted land, creating a fascination that reemerged during the Victorian age and remains with us today. In fact, Herodotus qualifies not just as the Father of History, but the Father of Cultural Travel itself, revealing to the ancient Greeks—who rarely deemed a foreign society worthy of interest—the rewards of exploring a distant, alien world.

  2. Marco Polo, The Travels of Marco Polo (c.1300)

When the 13th-century Venetian merchant Marco Polo returned home after two decades wandering China, Persia and Indonesia, the stories he and his two brothers told were dismissed as outright fiction—until (legend goes) the trio sliced open the hems of their garments, and hundreds of gems poured to the ground in a glittering cascade. Still, Polo's adventure might have remained all but unknown to posterity if an accident had not allowed him to overcome his writer's block: Imprisoned by the Genoans in 1298 after a naval battle, he used his enforced leisure time to dictate his memoirs to his cellmate, the romance writer Rustichello da Pisa. The resulting volume, filled with marvelous observations about Chinese cities and customs and encounters with the potentate Kublai Khan (and including, admittedly, some outrageous exaggerations), has been a bestseller ever since, and indelibly defined the Western view of the Orient. There is evidence that Polo intended his book to be a practical guide for future merchants to follow his path. The vision of fabulous Chinese wealth certainly inspired one eager and adventurous reader, fellow Italian Christopher Columbus, to seek a new ocean route to the Orient. (Of course, Islamic scholars will point out that the 14 th -century explorer Ibn Battuta traveled three times as far as Polo around Africa, Asia and China, but his monumental work Rihla , “The Journey,” remained little known in the West until the mid-19th century).

3. Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy (1768)

When the author of Tristram Shandy penned this extraordinary autobiographical novel, the Grand Tour of Europe as a rite of passage was in full swing. Wealthy young British aristocrats (almost invariably male), took educational expeditions to the great cultural sites of Paris, Venice, Rome and Naples, seeking out the classical sites and Renaissance artworks in the company of an erudite “bear leader,” or tour guide. Sterne's rollicking book suddenly turned the sober Grand Tour principle on its head. The narrator deliberately avoids all the great monuments and cathedrals, and instead embarks on a personal voyage, to meet unusual people, seeking out new and spontaneous experiences: (“'tis a quiet journey of the heart in pursuit of NATURE, and those affections which arise out of her, which make us love each other—and the world, better than we do.”) His meandering journey across France and Italy is filled with amusing encounters, often of an amorous nature (involving assorted chamber maids and having to share rooms in inns with member of the opposite sex), which prefigures the Romantic era's vision of travel as a journey of self-discovery. Even today, most “true travelers” pride themselves on finding vivid and unique experiences, rather than generic tourist snapshots or lazy escapes.

4. Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad (1869)

Writers of the Gilded Age (a term Mark Twain incidentally coined) produced thousands of earnest and tedious travel books, a tendency that Twain deftly deflated with Innocents Abroad. Sent as a journalist on a group cruise tour to see the great sights of Europe and the Holy Land, Twain filed a series of hilarious columns to the Alta California newspaper that he later reworked into this classic work. With its timely, self-deprecating humor, it touched a deep chord, lampooning the naïveté of his fellow Americans (“The gentle reader will never, never know what a consummate ass he can become until he goes abroad”) and the modest indignities of exploring the sophisticated Old World (“In Paris they just simply opened their eyes and stared when we spoke to them in French! We never did succeed in making those idiots understand their own language.”) The result was to embolden many more of his fellow countrymen to fearlessly cross the pond and immerse themselves in Europe, and, hardly less importantly, to begin a new style of comic travel writing that echoes today through hugely popular modern authors such as Bill Bryson. Today, Innocents Abroad is one of the few 19th-century travel books that is still read eagerly for pleasure. (Its perfect companion is, of course, Roughing It , Twain's account of his misspent youth as a miner in the wild American West).

5. Norman Douglas, Siren Land (1911)

The Italian island of Capri began its proud reputation for licentiousness in ancient Roman times, and by the mid-19 century was luring free-living artists, writers and bon vivants from chilly northern climes. (It was even said that Europe had two art capitals, Paris and Capri). But its modern reputation was sealed by the libertine writer Norman Douglas, whose volume Siren Land offered an account of the carefree southern Italian life “where paganism and nudity and laughter flourished,” an image confirmed by his 1917 novel South Wind , where the island is called Nepenthe, after the ancient Greek elixir of forgetfulness . (Siren Land gets its title from Homer’s Odyssey; Capri was the home of the Sirens, ravishing women who lured sailors to their deaths by shipwreck with their magical voices). Millions of sun-starved British readers were captivated by the vision of Mediterranean sensuality and Douglas' playful humor. (“It is rather puzzling when one comes to think of it,” he writes, “to conceive how the old Sirens passed their time on days of wintry storm. Modern ones would call for cigarettes, Grand Marnier, and a pack of cards, and bid the gale howl itself out.”) Douglas himself was flamboyantly gay, and liked to scamper drunkenly around Capri’s gardens with vine leaves in his hair. Thanks largely to his writings, the island in the 1920s entered a new golden age, luring exiles disillusioned by post-war Europe. The visitors included many great British authors who also penned travel writing classics, such as D.H. Lawrence (whose marvelous Etruscan Places covers his travels in Italy; Lawrence also showed drafts of the torrid Lady Chatterly’s Lover to friends while on holiday in Capri in 1926), E.M Forster, Christopher Isherwood, Aldous Huxley, Graham Greene and W.H. Auden. (The renowned poet wrote a travel volume on Iceland, of all places). The collective vision of Mediterranean freedom has inspired generations of travelers to those warm shores ever since.

6. Freya Stark, The Valley of the Assassins (1934)

The Victorian age produced a surprising number of adventurous women travel writers—Isabella Bird, for instance, wrote about exploring Hawaii, the Rocky Mountains and China—but the authors were regarded as rare and eccentric exceptions rather than role models by female readers. In the more liberated era of the 1930s, Freya Stark's tome revealed just how far women could travel alone and live to write about it. Her breakthrough book, The Valley of the Assassins , was a thrilling account of her journey through the Middle East. Its highlight was her visit to the ruined stronghold of the Seven Lords of Alamut, a medieval cult of hashish-eating political killers in the Elburz Mountains of Iran whose exploits had been legendary in the West since the Crusades. (The singular escapade made her one of the first women ever inducted into the Royal Geographical Society.) The bestseller was followed by some two dozen works whose freshness and candor inspired women to venture, if not by donkey into war zones, at least into exotic climes. “To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world,” she enthused in Baghdad Sketches . “You have no idea of what is in store for you, but you will, if you are wise and know the art of travel, let yourself go on the stream of the unknown and accept whatever comes in the spirit in which the gods may offer it.”

7. Jack Kerouac, On the Road (1957)

This thinly veiled autobiographical novel, about a group of young friends hitch-hiking and bumming their way across the United States, has inspired generations of restless readers to take a leap into the unknown. Although the publisher made Kerouac change the actual names (Kerouac became Sal Paradise, the wild driver Neal Cassady became Dean Moriarty and poet Allen Ginsberg became Carlo Marx), its episodes were almost entirely drawn from life, qualifying it as a classic of travel writing. It was also a cultural phenomenon: Kerouac legendarily hammered out the whole lyrical work on a giant scroll of paper (possibly on one speed-induced binge), and carried it about in his rucksack for years before it was published, becoming an instant icon of the rebellious “beat” era, thumbing its nose at the leaden conformity of the cold war era. Today, it is still a dangerous book to read at an impressionable age (at least for younger males; women tend to be left out of the boyish pursuits, except as sex objects). The delirious sense of freedom as Kerouac rides across the wheat fields of Nebraska in the back of a farm truck or speeds across the Wyoming Rockies toward Denver is infectious.

8. Tony and Maureen Wheeler, Across Asia on the Cheap (1973)

It was one of history's great self-publishing success stories. When two young travelers roughed it in a minivan from London to Sydney, they decided to write a practical guide about their experiences. Working on a kitchen table, they typed out a list of their favorite budget hotels and cheap restaurants from Tehran to Djakarta, stapled the copied pages together into a 90-page booklet and sold it for $1.80 a pop. Their instincts were correct: There was a huge hunger for information on how to travel on a budget in the Third World, and the modest booklet sold 1,500 copies in a week. The hit became the basis for Lonely Planet, a vast guidebook empire with books on almost every country on earth. The young and financially challenged felt welcomed into the exotic corners of Nepal, Morocco and Thailand, far from the realm of five-star hotels and tour groups, often for a few dollars a day. The guidebooks' power quickly became such that in many countries, a recommendation is still enough to make a hotelier's fortune. (Having sold 100 million copies of their guidebooks, the Wheelers finally sold Lonely Planet for £130 million in 2010 to the BBC. (The BBC recently confirmed plans to sell the franchise to NC2 Media at a loss for just £51.5 million. Nobody ever claimed Across Asia was high literature, but the Wheelers now help fund a literary institution, The Wheeler Center, in their home city of Melbourne, Australia, to promote serious fiction and non-fiction). 

9. Bruce Chatwin, In Patagonia (1977)

Along with Paul Theroux's wildly entertaining Great Railway Bazaar , Chatwin's slim, enigmatic volume became widely credited with the modern rebirth of travel writing. A former Sotheby's art auctioneer, the erudite Chatwin famously quit the London Sunday Times Magazine via telegram to his editor (“Have gone to Patagonia”) and disappeared into the then little-known and remote tip of South America. In a stylistic first for the genre, In Patagonia weaves a personal quest (for a piece of prehistoric skin of the mylodon, which the author had seen as a child) with the region's most surreal historical episodes, related in a poetic, crisp and laconic style. Focusing on god-forsaken outposts rather than popular attractions, Chatwin evokes the haunting ambiance with deftly drawn vignettes from Patagonia's storybook past, such as how Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid lived in a cabin in southern Argentina, or how a Welsh nationalist colony was begun in the windswept town of Trelew. And thus the quirky travel pilgrimage was born.

  10. Peter Mayle, A Year in Provence (1989)

Mayle's breezy account of his mid-life decision to escape dark and sodden England to renovate a farmhouse in Ménerbes, a village in the south of France, created an entire sub-genre of do-it-yourself travel memoirs filled with charmingly quirky locals. It also inspired thousands to physically emulate his life-changing project, flooding Provence and other sunny idylls with expats in search of a rustic fixer-upper and supplies of cheap wine. Aided by the relaxed residency laws of the European Union, discount airlines and France's super-fast TGV trains, the once-impoverished southern France quickly became gentrified by retirees from Manchester, Hamburg and Stockholm, until it is now, in the words of one critic, a “bourgeois theme park for foreigners.” (Tuscany became equally popular, thanks to Frances Mayes' beguiling books, with the shores of Spain and Portugal following suit). Things got so crowded that Mayle himself moved out – although he has since returned to a different tiny village, Lourmarin, a stone's throw from his original haunt. In recent years, Elizabeth Gilbert's wildly successful Eat Pray Love (2007) offered a similar spirit of personal reinvention, inspiring a new wave of travelers to follow her  path to the town of Ubud in Bali in search of spiritual (and romantic) fulfillment

A Smithsonian Magazine Contributing Writer, Tony Perrottet is the author of five travel and history books, including Pagan Holiday: On the Trail of Ancient Roman Tourists and The Sinner's Grand Tour: A Journey Through the Historical Underbelly of Europe; www.tonyperrottet.com

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Tony Perrottet

Tony Perrottet | READ MORE

Tony Perrottet is a contributing writer for Smithsonian magazine, a regular contributor to the New York Times and WSJ Magazine , and the author of six books including ¡Cuba Libre!: Che, Fidel and the Improbable Revolution that Changed World History , The Naked Olympics: The True Story of the Ancient Games and Napoleon's Privates: 2500 Years of History Unzipped . Follow him on Instagram @TonyPerrottet .

153 Best Travel Quotes To Inspire You To See The World

We’ve been putting together some of our favorite inspirational travel quotes as we continue to travel the world and experience new places and things abroad.

What follows is a complete collection of 153 of the best travel quotes, complete with adventure travel quotes from famous figures like Anthony Bourdain, John Muir, and Mark Twain.

Warning: some of these quotes may give you the travel itch! In any case, I hope you’ll find some of these short travel quotes inspirational for your own journey!

Table of Contents show 153 Best Travel Quotes • Famous Travel Quotes • Mark Twain Travel Quotes • Funny Travel Quotes • Short Travel Quotes • Misc Travel Quotes • Inspirational Travel Quotes • Travel With Friends Quotes • Adventure Travel Quotes • Solo Travel Quotes • Anthony Bourdain Travel Quotes More Travel Content & Tips  

153 Best Travel Quotes

• famous travel quotes.

The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page. — Unknown
Take only memories, leave only footprints. — Unknown
Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world. — Gustave Flaubert
Not all those who wander are lost. — J.R.R. Tolkien

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Every man dies, but not every man really lives. — William Wallace
To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all. — Oscar Wilde
Life is a journey. Make the most of it. — Unknown
I’ve traveled every road in this here land… I’ve been everywhere, man, I’ve been everywhere. — Johnny Cash

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Paris is always a good idea. — Audrey Hepburn
Travel is the only thing you buy that makes you richer. — Unknown
Collect moments, not things. — Unknown
Today is your day, your mountain is waiting. So get on your way. — Dr Seuss

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Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the things you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. — Unknown
I’m shaking the dust of this crummy little town off my feet and I’m gonna see the world. — George Bailey in It’s A Wonderful Life
It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to. — J.R.R. Tolkien
Nature is not a place to visit. It is home. — Gary Snyder

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Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not. — Ralph Waldo Emerson
The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. — Lao Tzu
In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks. — John Muir
The mountains are calling and I must go. — John Muir
Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves. — John Muir

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To move, to breathe, to fly, to float, to gain all while you give, to roam the roads of lands remote: To travel is to live. — Hans Christian Andersen
Oh the places you’ll go. — Dr. Seuss
I shall be telling this with a sigh, Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. — Robert Frost
When one is alone at night in the depths of the woods, the stillness is at once awful and sublime. — John Muir
Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own. — Charles Dickens

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• Mark Twain Travel Quotes

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the Earth all one’s lifetime.
To do something, say something, see something, before anybody else — these are the things that confer a pleasure compared with which other pleasures are tame and commonplace, other ecstasies cheap and trivial. Lifetimes of ecstasy crowded into a single moment.

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It is the loveliest fleet of islands [ Hawaii ] that lies anchored in any ocean.
No alien land in all the world has any deep strong charm for me but that one [ Hawaii ], no other land could so longingly and so beseechingly haunt me, sleeping and waking, through half a lifetime, as that one has done. Other things leave me, but it abides; other things change, but it remains the same.   For me the balmy airs are always blowing, its summer seas flashing in the sun; the pulsing of its surfbeat is in my ear; I can see its garlanded crags, its leaping cascades, its plumy palms drowsing by the shore, its remote summits floating like islands above the cloud wrack; I can feel the spirit of its wildland solitudes, I can hear the splash of its brooks; in my nostrils still lives the breath of flowers that perished twenty years ago.

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• Funny Travel Quotes

Airplanes may kill you, but they ain’t likely to hurt you. — Leroy Satchel Paige
Two great talkers will not travel far together. — George Borrow
I have found out that there ain’t no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them. — Mark Twain

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I travel a lot; I hate having my life disrupted by routine. — Caskie Stinnett
Did you ever notice that the first piece of luggage on the carousel never belongs to anyone? — Erma Bombeck
Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore. — Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz

Travel Quotes

• Short Travel Quotes

Once a year, go someplace you’ve never been before. — Unknown
Better to see something once than hear about it a thousand times. — Asian Proverb
Traveling – it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller. — Ibn Battutah
We travel not to escape life, but for life not to escape us. — Unknown

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One travels to run away from routine, that dreadful routine that kills all imagination and all our capacity for enthusiasm. — Ella Maillart
Half the fun of travel is the esthetic of lostness. — Ray Bradbury
The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes. — Marcel Proust
There are no foreign lands. It is the traveler only who is foreign. — Robert Louis Stevenson

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Life begins at the end of your comfort zone. — Neale Donald Walsh
I haven’t been everywhere, but it’s on my list. — Unknown
And I think to myself, what a wonderful world. — Louis Armstrong
They say travel broadens the mind, but you must have the mind. — G.K. Chesterton
Wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow. — Anita Desai

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Life is short and the world is wide. — Unknown
The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one’s own country as a foreign land. — G.K. Chesterton
A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving. — Lao Tzu
If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere. — Vincent van Gogh
The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness. — John Muir

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A wise traveler never despises his own country. — Carlos Osvaldo Goldoni
You know more of a road by having traveled it than by all the conjectures and descriptions in the world. — William Hazlitt
I love to travel, but hate to arrive. — Albert Einstein
And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul. — John Muir

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A great way to learn about your country is to leave it. — Henry Rollins
Live your life by a compass, not a clock. — Stephen Covey
Some experiences simply do not translate, you have to go to know. — Kobi Yamada

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I am not the same, having seen the moon shine on the other side of the world. — Mary Anne Radmacher
At its best, travel should challenge our preconceptions and most cherished views, cause us to rethink our assumptions, shake us a bit, make us broader minded and more understanding. — Arthur Frommer
Travel is never a matter of money, but of courage. — Paulo Coelho

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Some beautiful paths can’t be discovered without getting lost. — Erol Ozan
Travel far enough, you meet yourself. — David Mitchell
The journey itself is my home. — Matsuo Basho

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Live, travel, adventure, bless and don’t be sorry. — Jack Kerouac
The saddest journey in the world is the one that follows a precise itinerary. — Guillermo del Toro
A good traveler leaves no tracks. — Lao Tzu

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It’s in those quiet little towns, at the edge of the world, that you will find the salt of the Earth people who make you feel right at home. — Aaron Lauritsen
It is better to travel well than to arrive. — Unknown
The impulse to travel is one of the hopeful symptoms of life. — Agnes Repplier

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• Misc Travel Quotes

Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower. — Albert Camus
To the lover of wilderness, Alaska is one of the most wonderful countries in the world. — John Muir
When we contemplate the whole globe as one great dewdrop, striped and dotted with continents and islands, flying through space with other stars all singing and shining together as one, the whole universe appears as an infinite storm of beauty. — John Muir
I’m in love with Montana. For other states I have admiration, respect, recognition, even some affection. But with Montana, it is love. — John Steinbeck
Yosemite Park is a place of rest, a refuge from the roar and dust and weary, nervous, wasting work of the lowlands, in which one gains the advantages of both solitude and society. — John Muir
The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever. — Jacques Cousteau

Chinaman's Hat Island (Mokolii Island) Chinamans Hat Kayak Hike Oahu Hawaii Drone

The Mediterranean has the color of mackerel, changeable I mean. You don’t always know if it is green or violet, you can’t even say it’s blue, because the next moment the changing reflection has taken on a tint of rose or gray. — Vincent van Gogh
I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order. — John Burroughs
No pain here, no dull empty hours, no fear of the past, no fear of the future. These blessed mountains are so compactly filled with God’s beauty, no petty personal hope or experience has room to be. — John Muir
On earth there is no heaven, but there are pieces of it. — Jules Renard
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better. — Albert Einstein
Lighthouses are not just stone, brick, metal, and glass. There’s a human story at every lighthouse. — Elinor DeWire
To almost every man and woman there is something about a lighted beacon which suggests hope and trust and appeals to the better instincts of all mankind. — Edward Rowe Snowe

Maine Lighthouses

• Inspirational Travel Quotes

Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all. — Helen Keller
Never let your memories be greater than your dreams. — Douglas Ivester
All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity. But the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible. — Lawrence of Arabia
Do not dare not to dare. — C.S. Lewis
Everything you’ve ever wanted is on the other side of fear. — George Adair

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Wherever you go, go with all your heart. — Unknown
It seems to be a law of nature, inflexible and inexorable, that those who will not risk cannot win. — John Paul Jones
This is what holidays, travels, vacations are about. It is not really rest or even leisure we chase. We strain to renew our capacity for wonder to shock ourselves into astonishment once again. — Shana Alexander
I beg young people to travel. If you don’t have a passport, get one. Take a summer, get a backpack and go to Delhi, go to Saigon, go to Bangkok, go to Kenya. Have your mind blown. Eat interesting food. Dig some interesting people. Have an adventure. Be careful. Come back and you’re going to see your country differently, you’re going to see your president differently, no matter who it is. — Henry Rollins
Because in the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in an office or mowing your lawn. Climb that damn mountain. — Jack Kerouac
For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move; to feel the needs and hitches of our life more nearly; to come down off this feather-bed of civilization, and find the globe granite underfoot and strewn with cutting flints. — Robert Louis Stevenson

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Stuff your eyes with wonder, live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories. — Ray Bradbury
We leave something of ourselves behind when we leave a place. We stay there, even though we go away. And there are things in us that we can find again only by going back there. — Pascal Mercier
Once in a while it really hits people that they don’t have to experience the world in the way they have been told to. — Alan Keightley
Every dreamer knows that it is entirely possible to be homesick for a place you’ve never been to, perhaps more homesick than for familiar ground. — Judith Thurman

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Once you have traveled, the voyage never ends, but is played out over and over again in the quietest chambers. The mind can never break off from the journey. — Pat Conroy
No man is brave that has never walked a hundred miles. If you want to know the truth of who you are, walk until not a person knows your name. Travel is the great leveler, the great teacher, bitter as medicine, crueler than mirror-glass. A long stretch of road will teach you more about yourself than a hundred years of quiet. — Patrick Rothfuss
It is always sad to leave a place to which one knows one will never return. Such are the melancolies du voyage: perhaps they are one of the most rewarding things about traveling. — Gustave Flaubert

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The wish to travel seems to me characteristically human: the desire to move, to satisfy your curiosity or ease your fears, to change the circumstances of your life, to be a stranger, to make a friend, to experience an exotic landscape, to risk the unknown. — Paul Theroux
Although I deeply love oceans, deserts and other wild landscapes, it is only mountains that beckon me with that sort of painful magnetic pull to walk deeper and deeper into their beauty. They keep me continuously wanting to know more, feel more, see more. — Victoria Erickson

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• Travel With Friends Quotes

A journey is best measured in friends, rather than miles. — Tim Cahill
You will never be completely at home again, because part of your heart always will be elsewhere. That is the price you pay for the richness of loving and knowing people in more than one place. — Miriam Adeney
We are all travelers in the wilderness of this world, and the best we can find in our travels is an honest friend. — Robert Louis Stevenson

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• Adventure Travel Quotes

Adventure is worthwhile in itself. — Amelia Earhart
If you think adventure is dangerous, try routine; it is lethal. — Paulo Coelho
Most of us abandoned the idea of a life full of adventure and travel sometime between puberty and our first job. Our dreams died under the dark weight of responsibility. Occasionally the old urge surfaces, and we label it with names that suggest psychological aberrations: the big chill, a midlife crisis. — Tim Cahill
Only by going alone in silence, without baggage, can one truly get into the heart of the wilderness. All other travel is mere dust and hotels and baggage and chatter. — John Muir
Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit, and as vital to our lives as water and good bread. — Edward Abbey

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Once a journey is designed, equipped, and put in process, a new factor enters and takes over. A trip, a safari, an exploration, is an entity, different from all other journeys. It has personality, temperament, individuality, uniqueness. A journey is a person in itself; no two are alike. And all plans, safeguards, policing, and coercion are fruitless.   We find after years of struggle that we do not take a trip; a trip takes us. Tour masters, schedules, reservations, brass-bound and inevitable, dash themselves to wreckage on the personality of the trip. Only when this is recognized can the blown-in-the glass bum relax and go along with it. Only then do the frustrations fall away. In this a journey is like marriage. The certain way to be wrong is to think you control it. — John Steinbeck
What is that feeling when you’re driving away from people and they recede on the plain till you see their specks dispersing? – it’s the too-huge world vaulting us, and it’s good-bye. But we lean forward to the next crazy venture beneath the skies. — Jack Kerouac
A ship is safe in harbor, but that’s not what ships are for. — J.A. Shedd
Do not follow where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and make a trail. — Ralph Waldo Emerson

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It’s a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you’re ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any. — Hugh Laurie
Adventure is a path. Real adventure – self-determined, self-motivated, often risky – forces you to have firsthand encounters with the world. The world the way it is, not the way you imagine it. Your body will collide with the Earth and you will bear witness. In this way you will be compelled to grapple with the limitless kindness and bottomless cruelty of humankind – and perhaps realize that you yourself are capable of both. This will change you. Nothing will ever again be black-and-white. — Mark Jenkins

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The very basic core of a man’s living spirit is his passion for adventure. The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun. — Christopher McCandless
Adventure is allowing the unexpected to happen to you. Exploration is experiencing what you have not experienced before. How can there be any adventure, any exploration, if you let somebody else – above all, a travel bureau – arrange everything before-hand? — Richard Aldington
Be careful because Cambodia is the most dangerous place you will ever visit. You will fall in love with it, and eventually it will break your heart. — Joel Brinkley

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• Solo Travel Quotes

To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the most pleasant sensations in the world. — Freya Stark
Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. — Unknown
I can’t think of anything that excites a greater sense of childlike wonder than to be in a country where you are ignorant of almost everything. Suddenly you are five years old again. You can’t read anything, you have only the most rudimentary sense of how things work, you can’t reliably cross a street without endangering your life. Your whole existence becomes a series of interesting guesses. — Bill Bryson
The true fruit of travel is perhaps the feeling of being nearly everywhere at home. — Freya Stark

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When you’ve managed to stumble directly into the heart of the unknown – either through the misdirection of others, or better yet, through your own creative ineptitude – there is no one there to hold your hand or tell you what to do. In those bad lost moments, in the times when we are advised not to panic, we own the unknown, and the world belongs to us. The child within has full reign. Few of us are ever so free. — Tim Cahill
No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow. — Lin Yutang
He travels the fastest who travels alone. — Rudyard Kipling

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Travel can be one of the most rewarding forms of introspection. — Lawrence Durrell
When the traveler goes alone he gets acquainted with himself. — Liberty Hyde Bailey
The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait till that other is ready. — Henry David Thoreau

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I think one travels more usefully when they travel alone, because they reflect more. — Thomas Jefferson
Loving life is easy when you are abroad. Where no one knows you and you hold your life in your hands all alone, you are more master of yourself than at any other time. — Hannah Arendt
Personally I like going places where I don’t speak the language, don’t know anybody, don’t know my way around and don’t have any delusions that I’m in control. Disoriented, even frightened, I feel alive, awake in ways I never am at home. — Michael Mewshaw

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I can speak to my soul only when the two of us are off exploring deserts or cities or mountains or roads. — Paulo Coelho
Afoot and light-hearted I take to the open road. Healthy, free, the world before me. The long brown path before me leading me wherever I choose. — Walt Whitman

   

• Anthony Bourdain Travel Quotes

If you’re twenty-two, physically fit, hungry to learn and be better, I urge you to travel – as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to. Find out how other people live and eat and cook. Learn from them – wherever you go.
Travel changes you. As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life — and travel — leaves marks on you. Most of the time, those marks — on your body or on your heart — are beautiful. Often, though, they hurt.
It’s an irritating reality that many places and events defy description. Angkor Wat and Machu Picchu , for instance, seem to demand silence, like a love affair you can never talk about.   For a while after, you fumble for words, trying vainly to assemble a private narrative, an explanation, a comfortable way to frame where you’ve been and what’s happened. In the end, you’re just happy you were there — with your eyes open — and lived to see it.

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Travel is about the gorgeous feeling of teetering in the unknown.
I’m a big believer in winging it. I’m a big believer that you’re never going to find the perfect city travel experience or the perfect meal without a constant willingness to experience a bad one. Letting the happy accident happen is what a lot of vacation itineraries miss, I think, and I’m always trying to push people to allow those things to happen rather than stick to some rigid itinerary.
Do we really want to travel in hermetically sealed popemobiles through the rural provinces of France, Mexico and the Far East, eating only in Hard Rock Cafes and McDonalds? … I know what I want. I want it all. I want to try everything once.

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It seems that the more places I see and experience, the bigger I realize the world to be. The more I become aware of, the more I realize how relatively little I know of it, how many places I have still to go, how much more there is to learn.   Maybe that’s enlightenment enough – to know that there is no final resting place of the mind, no moment of smug clarity. Perhaps wisdom, at least for me, means realizing how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go.
I think food, culture, people and landscape are all absolutely inseparable.
Food is everything we are. It’s an extension of nationalist feeling, ethnic feeling, your personal history, your province, your region, your tribe, your grandma. It’s inseparable from those from the get-go.
Southeast Asia has a real grip on me. From the very first time I went there, it was a fulfillment of my childhood fantasies of the way travel should be.

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I wanted adventures. I wanted to go up the Nung river to the heart of darkness in Cambodia . I wanted to ride out into a desert on camelback, sand and dunes in every direction, eat whole roasted lamb with my fingers. I wanted to kick snow off my boots in a Mafiya nightclub in Russia. I wanted to play with automatic weapons in Phnom Penh, recapture the past in a small oyster village in France, step into a seedy neon-lit pulqueria in rural Mexico. I wanted to run roadblocks in the middle of the night, blowing past angry militia with a handful of hurled Marlboro packs, experience fear, excitement, wonder.   I wanted kicks – the kind of melodramatic thrills and chills I’d yearned for since childhood, the kind of adventure I’d found as a little boy in the pages of my Tintin comic books. I wanted to see the world – and I wanted the world to be just like the movies.
At this point I think my body is like an old car. Another dent ain’t gonna make a whole lot of difference. At best it’s a reminder that you’re still alive and lucky as hell. Another tattoo, another thing you did, another place you’ve been.

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Without experimentation, a willingness to ask questions and try new things, we shall surely become static, repetitive, and moribund.
If I’m an advocate for anything, it’s to move. As far as you can, as much as you can. Across the ocean, or simply across the river. The extent to which you can walk in someone else’s shoes or at least eat their food, it’s a plus for everybody. Open your mind, get up off the couch, move.
Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.

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More Travel Content & Tips

That’s a roundup of our favorite adventure travel quotes! I hope you’ve found these travel quotes inspirational for your own journeys.

Don’t forget to check out my latest travel blog posts and our complete destination guides by country!

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The Best Destinations in the World: The Gold List 2022

By CNT Editors

Goa India

There are three great lists annually in  Condé Nast Traveler,  all of which have changed due to the events of the last two years: the Readers’ Choice Awards , which you, our beloved audience, select; the Hot List , which compiles the new and notable of the previous year; and this one, which is ultimately about the places and experiences our editors carry in their hearts. This year, when we say  our editors,  we mean  CNT ’s entire global crew, working in locations from California to Beijing ; we’ve also expanded the parameters of the list to include not just the hotels and cruises you’ve seen in years past, but also the destinations we treasure. The Gold List is, more than ever, made by humans for other humans—something we need more than ever in this day and age. Here, our favorite destinations in the world.

Read the complete set of Gold List winners   here .

All listings featured in this story are independently selected by our editors. However, when you book something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Cholula Puebla Mexico

Puebla, Mexico

I love when I can feel familiar with a new place in 48 hours. In Puebla , Mexico’s historic, fourth-largest city, all the spots you want to hit are walking distance within its center, itself a tidy sprawl of bright pink and yellow villas and small plazas. That includes food markets for a crispy cemita (a schnitzel-­style sandwich with all the fixings); the gilded Capilla del Rosario and the city’s famed talavera, or ceramic houses; I stayed for close to an hour watching the row of artisans hand-paint and hand-fire their mugs, plates, and vases at Uriarte Talavera. Before the pandemic, tourism was just starting to happen here, and the city was in that sweet spot of supporting a new breed of traveler, like with the artisanal-inspired Cartesiano hotel, but without muting any of its essence for international business. I liked that I had to use my shoddy Spanish with barkeeps and store owners. And that sitting in those plazas meant a front-row seat to daily Poblano life: vendors selling sliced cucumber spices with cayenne, old-timers playing dominos. Puebla felt like a special somewhere on the verge of discovery in a country with pockets already turned over to the masses. My guess with all that’s happened this past year is that it still does. —Erin Florio

Rio de Janeiro Brazil

Rio de Janeiro

If you were to hook the city of Rio de Janeiro up to a cardiogram, the needle would swing off the page. The city thrums with live samba and bossa nova at all hours of the day; the bustling streets, bookended by the dramatic rise of granite monoliths on one end and the pounding waves of the Atlantic on the other, have a pulse all their own. It's easy to feel this when you're amid throngs of colorfully clad cariocas —I feel it most swaying to the live music at Pedra do Sal on Monday nights, or when, perched in the leafy hilltop neighborhood of Santa Teresa, I hear people in neighborhoods below lean out their windows to cheer when Flamengo scores a goal. It's a complicated city, with plenty of issues—insecurity, corruption, inequity, to name just a few—but there's a premium on joy and celebration that isn't reserved for Carnaval . There are few places in the world where you know you couldn't possibly be anywhere else, and whenever I hear the whole of Arpoador beach break into applause as the sun sets in summer, I'm reminded that Rio is one of them. —Megan Spurrell

Alentejo Vicente Coast

Alentejo, Portugal

I call the road to the sea through Portugal’s Alentejo region the place where the beatniks read Pessoa; you can imagine Kerouac breezing through its small hotels, surf camps, and villages scattered with craft shops, markets, and bohemian bars. For me it’s a place of happiness. There are boutique hotels like São Lourenço do Barrocal and Dá Licença and olive groves, cork oaks, and infinite horizons. The road ends at Vicentine Coast National Park, a wild, protected coastline in southern Europe. A paradise for surfers , it has electrifying sunsets, but the icy waters stop it from ever getting too crowded. —David Moralejo

Svalbard Norway

Svalbard, Norway

Arctic Svalbard —whose capital, Longyearbyen, is the world’s northernmost town—is like nowhere else I’ve been. On the one hand, it’s a deep-nature Scandi fantasy of snowmobiles, Northern Lights, ski-touring along glacial valleys, and surprisingly smart boutiques with stacked wine cellars. But there’s also a compelling strangeness to this international settlement, where no one is born and no one dies. There are the Soviet mining towns with their Lenin busts, whether abandoned or (even weirder) still working; the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, which preempts a coming apocalypse; it’s advisable to leave Longyearbyen with a shotgun, in case of polar-bear attack. As much as a destination, it’s a journey into the heart of the climate crisis, with academics from across the world doing game-changing research here. I’m itching to go again—to escape but also to think and connect, which is what happens in all the best places. —Toby Skinner

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Goa India

My first trip to Goa as a college student was wrapped in dreams of homemade chorizo and reliving moments from the cult Bollywood coming-of-age film Dil Chahta Hai . Many trips and feni cocktails later, Goa remained a respite for my city-weary bones. The state straddles its multicultural past and present, trading up ’60s hippie markets for hipster boutiques while keeping its old-world Indian and Portuguese traditions intact. Simple fish-curry plates, aunties doing an impromptu jig to fado, old-timers squabbling over their favorite Goan soccer club, and the right freshness of bread coexist with edgy global menus, alt-music gigs, and all that is artisanal and arty. The ocean changes color from one season to the next, the multi-color sunsets never repeat, and like many travelers, I continue to return and find my salve in sunshine, sea, and susegad —the quintessential Goan idea of the slow, easy, and good life. —Diya Kohl

Plettenberg Bay South Africa

Plettenberg Bay, South Africa

Plettenberg Bay is South Africa's summer playground, and I, a Capetonian, would drive the 186-mile coastal path along the scenic Garden Route each year to join the fun. The bohemian seaside town sits atop a sheltered bay, where a jumble of hipster coffee shops, seafood restaurants, and kitsch boutiques tumble down onto fynbos-covered cliffs—where a slew of new hotels like The Robberg Beach Lodge sit beside grandes dames like The Plettenberg Hotel . Pretty young things like to celebrate the end of matric student exams, where hedonism sweeps across the bay, while dolphin and whale watches come during the languid, warm winter months. Venture just outside Plett to find the luxury Tsala Treetop Lodge , a manicured Gary Player golf course, indigenous Keurbooms River Nature Reserve, the Plett Polo Club on the Kurland Estate, and a host of animal sanctuaries to meet cheetahs, elephants, and monkeys. But above all, come for the glorious golden beaches. Central Beach—dotted with bars—surfy Lookout Beach, and the eerie, mist-covered sands of Robberg Nature Reserve. Search hard enough and you might stumble on a sand dollar—the symbol of Plettenberg Bay, thought to bring eternal luck. —Isabella Sullivan

Scottsdale Arizona

When I can’t take another minute of winter, I head to Scottsdale. As, historically, do the day-drinking spring breakers and the far less rowdy snowbirds. Recently, though, the Valley of the Sun has come into its own, claiming its stunning desert setting and Southwest culture in new ways. If I’m bringing the kids, the 1929 Frank Lloyd Wright–designed grande dame The Arizona Biltmore, A Waldorf Astoria Resort (on the border of Scottsdale and Phoenix), is my place. It has sprawling grounds and seven pools, one with a legitimate waterslide, and just underwent a much-needed facelift. Sanctuary Camelback Mountain Resort , terraced into the side of its namesake adobe-hued mountain, has my favorite spa in town. Its adults-only pool on weekends and easy access to sunrise hiking give me plenty of excuses to leave the kids at home. Solo or with family, I can always bank on sunshine, a great exhibit at Phoenix’s nearby Desert Botanical Garden, and excellent Sonoran-style Mexican food. —Rebecca Misner

Tuscany Val Graziosa

Val Graziosa, Italy

I am a frequent traveler to Val Graziosa, a valley near the Pisan mountains and a part of Tuscany relatively unknown and terribly beautiful. Here there is Monte Pisano—“ che i Pisan veder Lucca non ponno, ” the poet Dante said, a small group of mountains that hides Lucca from Pisa and makes it impossible for the Pisan locals to see the city of Lucca. There are olive trees everywhere, producing the best olive oil on Earth in a splendid countryside. I love to walk around the surroundings of Montemagno—please read the book Maledetti Toscani, by Curzio Malaparte, and you will understand a lot about Italians from this region. I love to go to the grocery store in Patrizia for a glass of wine (the one and only épicerie of the village) and then to Certosa di Calci, a 14th-century monastery, and one of the many secret beauties in my crazy country of Italy. —Maddalena Fosati

Chiang Mai Thailand

Chiang Mai, Thailand

When I first went to Chiang Mai, I intended to stay a couple of nights and ended up staying more than a week; for me, that trip is a reminder of travel at its most impulsive and impetuous: the freedom to move on when you feel like it. There’s no beach pressure here, and inland Thailand always feels more interesting than the obvious hits of the beachfront. And, away from the beaches, there's the sense of a modern Thai city where young creatives are carving out a contemporary aesthetic, with the energy that a large student population gives a city. —Rick Jordan

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Past Factory

Past Factory

These Famous Photos Defined An Era And It's Crazy How Far We've Come

Posted: May 27, 2024 | Last updated: May 28, 2024

<p>Back in 1968, kids liked to have good, wholesome fun by gathering around for a game of Twister. There was no better way to keep an eye on your kids than to have them in your very own home.</p> <p>Twister was invented in 1966 after its inventors had the idea to use people as playing pieces. The game became widely popular in 1966 when Johnny Carson played it with Eva Gabor on an episode of <i>The Tonight Show</i>. Back then, Milton Bradley's competitors accused them of selling "an explicit activity in a box."</p>

Throughout history, there have been iconic moments that defined an era and thanks to the advent of photography, we've been lucky to capture many of those moments. From the fashion trends of the '20s and '40s to a night out at Studio 54, there's always something to look back at as a reminder of those times. When looking back at these photos, it's pretty unfathomable to think about how far we've come in society. Photos like these can really take us back. Read on to look at some of the most memorable times over the decades and see if they make you feel nostalgic.

Images Press/IMAGES/Getty Images

'70s: A Typical Night At Studio 54

Jerry Hall, Andy Warhol, and Debbie Harry were among Studio 54's regulars and in this photo, they're enjoying the night with friends Truman Capote and Paloma Picasso (on the right).

The infamous establishment on West 54th Street in Manhattan started out as an opera house before it was used as a studio by CBS. In 1977, the space was converted into a nightclub, but it wasn't long until the club came onto the IRS's radar. After it was raided, owners Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager were arrested for embezzlement. Studio 54's final party was in February 1980.

<p>Throughout history, there have been iconic moments that defined an era and thanks to the advent of photography, we've been lucky to capture many of those moments. From the fashion trends of the '20s and '40s to a night out at Studio 54, there's always something to look back at as a reminder of those times. When looking back at these photos, it's pretty unfathomable to think about how far we've come in society. Photos like these can really take us back. Let's look at some of the most memorable times over the decades and see if they make you feel nostalgiac.</p>

'50s: Milkshake Dates Were Very Sweet

Here's a photo of a teen couple sharing an Awful Awful ice cream drink back in 1958. Back in the day, Awful Awful drinks were anything but. They were slightly different from milkshakes in that instead of regular ice cream as the base ingredient, Awful Awfuls were made with ice milk and flavored syrup.

New Jersey chain Bond's came up with the recipe in the late '40s and the drink became popular all across the east coast. People loved to get their Awful Awfuls from Friendly's or Newport Creamery.

Read More: The Real Truth Behind The Viking Culture

<p>In 1931, people flocked to the cinemas to see Charlie Chaplin's <i>City Lights</i>. In this photo, people are lining up at the George M. Cohan Theater on Broadway in New York City's Times Square.</p> <p>Silent films were left behind in the previous decade in favor of the "talkies," but Chaplin decided to keep working with the silent format. He had already started developing the script for <i>City Lights</i> in 1928. In this film, Chaplin's tramp character falls for a blind girl, played by Virginia Cherrill, while he also starts a whirlwind friendship with an alcoholic millionaire.</p>

'30s: City Lights Premieres In New York City

In 1931, people flocked to the cinemas to see Charlie Chaplin's City Lights . In this photo, people are lining up at the George M. Cohan Theater on Broadway in New York City's Times Square.

Silent films were left behind in the previous decade in favor of the "talkies," but Chaplin decided to keep working with the silent format. He had already started developing the script for City Lights in 1928. In this film, Chaplin's tramp character falls for a blind girl, played by Virginia Cherrill, while he also starts a whirlwind friendship with an alcoholic millionaire.

<p>In this photo a woman laments having to put a sign on the back of her Ford Pinto that reads "Keep off my rear, I'm explosive!" Back in the 1970s, Ford Motor Company apparently didn't care about safety regulation so much as they did selling cars.</p> <p>They introduced the Ford Pinto with size, cost efficiency, and "product superiority" as its top features, but that superiority fell short of safety. The poorly designed fuel tanks made the Ford Pinto susceptible to exploding, even with crashes that happened at low speeds. Dozens of people died in Ford Pinto fires that decade.</p>

'70s: Ford Pintos Weren't As Safe As They Seemed

In this photo a woman laments having to put a sign on the back of her Ford Pinto that reads "Keep off my rear, I'm explosive!" Back in the 1970s, Ford Motor Company apparently didn't care about safety regulation so much as they did selling cars.

They introduced the Ford Pinto with size, cost efficiency, and "product superiority" as its top features, but that superiority fell short of safety. The poorly designed fuel tanks made the Ford Pinto susceptible to exploding, even with crashes that happened at low speeds. Dozens of people died in Ford Pinto fires that decade.

<p>The famous Hollywood sign didn't always appear how it does today. This photo from 1924 shows that the sign once read "Hollywoodland". It was built in 1923 to advertise a whites-only housing development in the hills of Mulholland Drive, overlooking Los Angeles. </p> <p>It was only meant to stay up for a year and a half, but it soon became an internationally recognized symbol so it stayed up. The sign suffered years of deterioration and was restored in 1949 under the condition that "land" be removed. It now represents the entire district, rather than a defunct segregated housing development. </p>

'20s: The Original Hollywood Sign's Embarrassing Past

The famous Hollywood sign didn't always appear how it does today. This photo from 1924 shows that the sign once read "Hollywoodland". It was built in 1923 to advertise a whites-only housing development in the hills of Mulholland Drive, overlooking Los Angeles.

It was only meant to stay up for a year and a half, but it soon became an internationally recognized symbol so it stayed up. The sign suffered years of deterioration and was restored in 1949 under the condition that "land" be removed. It now represents the entire district, rather than a defunct segregated housing development.

<p>This photo from 1942 depicts Betty Jean and Henry Schwaber (standing) listening to the radio with their friends at their home in Jamaica, Long Island. Betty and Henry, 13 and 10 respectively, wrote a letter to then-President Roosevelt suggesting that he time his address to the youth of the world so that they'd get to listen to it. </p> <p>President Roosevelt made many addresses to the nation during his presidency, but none will be more important than the "Infamy Speech" he gave on December 8, 1941, just after the attack on Pearl Harbor. </p>

'40s: Children Gathered Around The Radio To Hear The President

This photo from 1942 depicts Betty Jean and Henry Schwaber (standing) listening to the radio with their friends at their home in Jamaica, Long Island. Betty and Henry, 13 and 10 respectively, wrote a letter to then-President Roosevelt suggesting that he time his address to the youth of the world so that they'd get to listen to it.

President Roosevelt made many addresses to the nation during his presidency, but none will be more important than the "Infamy Speech" he gave on December 8, 1941, just after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

<p>These two guys are sadly pouring bottles of alcohol down a street drain in the 1920s. All that liquor was going to waste as a result of the Prohibition era in the United States. A widespread temperance movement swept the nation in the early 20th century, which led to the 18th Amendment that banned the manufacture, transportation, and sale of intoxicating liquors.</p> <p>Throughout this time, there was a rise in gang violence and illegal drinking due to lack of enforcement. Eventually Congress repealed the 18th Amendment with the 21st in 1933.</p>

'20s: Men Letting Their Liquor Go In The Street

These two guys are sadly pouring bottles of alcohol down a street drain in the 1920s. All that liquor was going to waste as a result of the Prohibition era in the United States. A widespread temperance movement swept the nation in the early 20th century, which led to the 18th Amendment that banned the manufacture, transportation, and sale of intoxicating liquors.

Throughout this time, there was a rise in gang violence and illegal drinking due to lack of enforcement. Eventually Congress repealed the 18th Amendment with the 21st in 1933.

<p>In the '60s, clothing got a little smaller, especially with the advent of mini skirts. In this photo from 1966, a group of women in London are all wearing mini skirts and coincidentally, they are lining up to break the world record for most passengers in a BMC Mini.</p> <p>They were about to break the standing record at the time by fitting 15 girls in one car, which was just enough to beat the record set by American students the previous year. Many decades later in 2012, a group of 28 women made a new world record!</p>

'60s: Fifteen Minis Squeeze Into A Mini

In the '60s, clothing got a little smaller, especially with the advent of mini skirts. In this photo from 1966, a group of women in London are all wearing mini skirts and coincidentally, they are lining up to break the world record for most passengers in a BMC Mini.

They were about to break the standing record at the time by fitting 15 girls in one car, which was just enough to beat the record set by American students the previous year. Many decades later in 2012, a group of 28 women made a new world record!

<p>In this photo, New Yorkers gather around a store window to witness the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on June 2, 1953. Americans were just as obsessed with the royal family as they are in the present day and back then, television networks battled it out to be the first to broadcast the ceremony for American viewers.</p> <p>People were enamored with Elizabeth even before she became queen, after her father, King George VI, brought his family to America as a symbolic gesture during World War II. Queen Elizabeth ascended the throne after her father passed away in 1952.</p>

'50s: American Crowd Watches Queen Elizabeth's Coronation

In this photo, New Yorkers gather around a store window to witness the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on June 2, 1953. Americans were just as obsessed with the royal family as they are in the present day and back then, television networks battled it out to be the first to broadcast the ceremony for American viewers.

People were enamored with Elizabeth even before she became queen, after her father, King George VI, brought his family to America as a symbolic gesture during World War II. Queen Elizabeth ascended the throne after her father passed away in 1952.

<p>This photo from July 1969 was taken in the Mission Operations Control Room at NASA's Mission Control Center. This photo was taken on the second day of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, as a photo of Neil A. Armstrong was getting transmitted from the onboard camera on the Apollo 11 as it hurled toward the moon.</p> <p>Armstrong was approximately 130,000 nautical miles into orbit when the photo was taken and sent back down to Earth. Armstrong and fellow astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin became the first men to set foot on the moon. </p>

'60s: Mission Control Receives A Photo Of Neil Armstrong

This photo from July 1969 was taken in the Mission Operations Control Room at NASA's Mission Control Center. This photo was taken on the second day of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, as a photo of Neil A. Armstrong was getting transmitted from the onboard camera on the Apollo 11 as it hurled toward the moon.

Armstrong was approximately 130,000 nautical miles into orbit when the photo was taken and sent back down to Earth. Armstrong and fellow astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin became the first men to set foot on the moon.

<p>British Airways took off for its first commercial Concorde flight on January 21, 1976. This flight was headed to Bahrain, while another from Paris was headed for Rio de Janeiro. For 12 years, Britain, France, America, and Russia were in a race to develop the first supersonic passenger airlines. </p> <p>The supersonic planes known as Concordes had powerful engines that could achieve cruising speeds of 1,350 miles per hour, which cut travel times in half. Britain partnered with France and successfully completed the project, after the U.S. backed out and Russia's attempts were fatal. </p>

'70s: The Very First Flight Of The Concord

British Airways took off for its first commercial Concorde flight on January 21, 1976. This flight was headed to Bahrain, while another from Paris was headed for Rio de Janeiro. For 12 years, Britain, France, America, and Russia were in a race to develop the first supersonic passenger airlines.

The supersonic planes known as Concordes had powerful engines that could achieve cruising speeds of 1,350 miles per hour, which cut travel times in half. Britain partnered with France and successfully completed the project, after the U.S. backed out and Russia's attempts were fatal.

<p>This photo from September 1966 shows Sonny and Cher, who were in Frankfurt, Germany during their European tour. Their amazing outfits were definitely ahead of their time and these getups caused quite a shock. Sonny and Cher reportedly were refused entry to certain hotels and restaurants because their outfits were too bizarre.</p> <p>At that point in time, Sonny and Cher already had two hit songs, "Baby Don't Go" and "I Got You Babe." They became such a success, they even had their own TV show, which ultimately lost popularity after their divorce.</p>

'60s: Sonny And Cher Were Too Avant Garde

This photo from September 1966 shows Sonny and Cher, who were in Frankfurt, Germany during their European tour. Their amazing outfits were definitely ahead of their time and these getups caused quite a shock. Sonny and Cher reportedly were refused entry to certain hotels and restaurants because their outfits were too bizarre.

At that point in time, Sonny and Cher already had two hit songs, "Baby Don't Go" and "I Got You Babe." They became such a success, they even had their own TV show, which ultimately lost popularity after their divorce.

<p>This photo from 1925 shows the quintessential style of the 1920s. These models are wearing coats with fur trim and the cloche-style hats that were popular in those days. Suffice to say that these women are the perfect visual representation of the "Roaring Twenties."</p> <p>One might even go so far as to consider these ladies "flappers," who in those days were young women who celebrated their freedom by partaking in an outrageous lifestyle that many considered to be immoral. Flapper women are considered by many as the first generation of women in America to celebrate their personal independence.</p>

'20s: These Lovely Ladies Lived Through The Roaring Twenties

This photo from 1925 shows the quintessential style of the 1920s. These models are wearing coats with fur trim and the cloche-style hats that were popular in those days. Suffice to say that these women are the perfect visual representation of the "Roaring Twenties."

One might even go so far as to consider these ladies "flappers," who in those days were young women who celebrated their freedom by partaking in an outrageous lifestyle that many considered to be immoral. Flapper women are considered by many as the first generation of women in America to celebrate their personal independence.

'60s: People Were Tied Up In Knots

Back in 1968, kids liked to have good, wholesome fun by gathering around for a game of Twister. There was no better way to keep an eye on your kids than to have them in your very own home.

Twister was invented in 1966 after its inventors had the idea to use people as playing pieces. The game became widely popular in 1966 when Johnny Carson played it with Eva Gabor on an episode of The Tonight Show . Back then, Milton Bradley's competitors accused them of selling "an explicit activity in a box."

<p>On May 13, 1949, it was just another glorious day to take your children shopping in Levittown, Pennsylvania. Back then, it was perfectly alright to leave your baby carriages along the side of the building and parking stalls were spacious and abundant.</p> <p>Pennsylvania's Levittown was the second development Levittown built, after the one built on Long Island. They were conceived by William J. Levitt, who is considered the creator of the modern American suburb. There were only six styles for homes in Levittown, Pennsylvania, but they were moderately priced and required only a low down payment.</p>

'40s: Suburbs Take Over America

On May 13, 1949, it was just another glorious day to take your children shopping in Levittown, Pennsylvania. Back then, it was perfectly alright to leave your baby carriages along the side of the building and parking stalls were spacious and abundant.

Pennsylvania's Levittown was the second development Levittown built, after the one built on Long Island. They were conceived by William J. Levitt, who is considered the creator of the modern American suburb. There were only six styles for homes in Levittown, Pennsylvania, but they were moderately priced and required only a low down payment.

<p>This aerial shot of Manhattan was taken on October 20, 1970, amid construction of the World Trade Center. The World Trade Center, of course, featured the Twin Towers, which were officially opened on April 4, 1973. At the time of their completion, they were the tallest buildings in the world. </p> <p>Almost 30 years later, in what would go down as one of the darkest days in American history, the September 11 attacks in 2001 caused the buildings to collapse, which resulted in thousands of deaths. Since then, the World Trade Center complex has been rebuilt with a memorial for those who lost their lives. </p>

'70s: The Tallest Buildings In The World Getting Built

This aerial shot of Manhattan was taken on October 20, 1970, amid construction of the World Trade Center. The World Trade Center, of course, featured the Twin Towers, which were officially opened on April 4, 1973. At the time of their completion, they were the tallest buildings in the world.

Almost 30 years later, in what would go down as one of the darkest days in American history, the September 11 attacks in 2001 caused the buildings to collapse, which resulted in thousands of deaths. Since then, the World Trade Center complex has been rebuilt with a memorial for those who lost their lives.

<p>Back in 1955, there was no better way to spend a night out than at the drive-in! In this photo, folks on Long Island drove their cars out to the local drive-in to watch the latest and greatest movie releases.</p> <p>Though the earliest drive-ins date back to 1915, the concept was at its peak during the '50s and the '60s. They were popular for the privacy of watching a movie within the comfort of your own car. It worked well for adults with young children, as well as for young couples on a first date.</p>

'50s: Drive-Ins Were At Their Peak

Back in 1955, there was no better way to spend a night out than at the drive-in! In this photo, folks on Long Island drove their cars out to the local drive-in to watch the latest and greatest movie releases.

Though the earliest drive-ins date back to 1915, the concept was at its peak during the '50s and the '60s. They were popular for the privacy of watching a movie within the comfort of your own car. It worked well for adults with young children, as well as for young couples on a first date.

<p>Here is a line of cars outside a filling station in Boston, Massachusetts in 1973. That year, there was a huge oil crisis that began after the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Counties proclaimed an oil embargo.</p> <p>The embargo targeted nations that were deemed to be in support of Israel during the Yom Kippur War, the United States included. During the crisis, the price of oil had risen from three dollars per barrel to twelve dollars all across the world. The embargo had serious implications for the international economy.</p>

'70s: The Oil Crisis Made Many Thirsty Cars

Here is a line of cars outside a filling station in Boston, Massachusetts in 1973. That year, there was a huge oil crisis that began after the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Counties proclaimed an oil embargo.

The embargo targeted nations that were deemed to be in support of Israel during the Yom Kippur War, the United States included. During the crisis, the price of oil had risen from three dollars per barrel to twelve dollars all across the world. The embargo had serious implications for the international economy.

<p>These young men attracted a lot of side glances from passersby during a walk through the city in 1943. They're drawing so much attention because of their "zoot suits," which were not common streetwear in the early '40s.</p> <p>Zoot suits were comprised of high-waisted, wide-legged trousers, paired with long coats that had wide lapels and shoulder pads. They were particularly popular among immigrant and minority communities in America at the time, but they were also made popular by jazz bandleader Cab Calloway. Calloway often wore exaggerated zoot suits on stage and in the 1943 film <i>Stormy Weather</i>.</p>

'40s: Zoot Suits Were All The Rage

These young men attracted a lot of side glances from passersby during a walk through the city in 1943. They're drawing so much attention because of their "zoot suits," which were not common streetwear in the early '40s.

Zoot suits were comprised of high-waisted, wide-legged trousers, paired with long coats that had wide lapels and shoulder pads. They were particularly popular among immigrant and minority communities in America at the time, but they were also made popular by jazz bandleader Cab Calloway. Calloway often wore exaggerated zoot suits on stage and in the 1943 film Stormy Weather .

<p>Here is a crowd of "hippies" at a "happening" at San Francisco's Golden Gate Park in 1967. Hippie counterculture became so prominent in the area at the time that Golden Gate Park is now home to an area dubbed "Hippie Hill." Back then, hanging out with your friends at the park was a perfectly fine way to spend an afternoon.</p> <p>The term "hippie" to describe these young people was reportedly coined by journalist Herb Caen, who wrote for the <i>San Francisco Chronicle</i>. 1967 was the same year that Golden Gate Park first had its "Human Be-In."</p>

'60s: Hippies Gather At Golden Gate Park

Here is a crowd of "hippies" at a "happening" at San Francisco's Golden Gate Park in 1967. Hippie counterculture became so prominent in the area at the time that Golden Gate Park is now home to an area dubbed "Hippie Hill." Back then, hanging out with your friends at the park was a perfectly fine way to spend an afternoon.

The term "hippie" to describe these young people was reportedly coined by journalist Herb Caen, who wrote for the San Francisco Chronicle . 1967 was the same year that Golden Gate Park first had its "Human Be-In."

Read More: Fascinating Historical Figures That We're Lucky To Have Photos Of

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This Beachfront Resort on Anguilla Has More Than 140 Rums, a Famous Spa, and a Pristine Private Beach

Zemi Beach House has been a favorite of Travel + Leisure readers for years. Here's why.

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Stepping onto Zemi Beach House ’s property was like stepping into a mini paradise.

Met with warm and genuine greetings from the moment I stepped out of the taxi, I was quickly handed a cold towel and a delicious cocktail. As I was escorted to my room on the back of a golf cart, my driver fed me facts and punny dad jokes the whole way. 

Upon entering my room, I was blown away by its sheer size, and again, I was beside myself after seeing the view from my patio. I could walk straight onto the beach from my porch!

While the size of the space grabbed my attention, what impressed me was the attention to detail: The rubber ducky on the tub, the handwritten welcome note, and the freshly baked cookies at night. The staff noticed which type of sugar I used with my morning coffee and then didn’t just replace it but gave me extra .

This attention to detail throughout the entire resort exuded a sense of luxury. There were always enough beach chairs available, and the beach never felt full; the waiter at dinner would always come around just as I was finishing my drink to offer another; the front desk staff would remember my name and say hello every morning — it's all in the tiny details at Zemi. 

Zemi Beach House

  • Guest rooms provide a ton of space — some suites are more than 2,000 square feet.
  • The food and beverage program is top-notch, with fine dining menus and an impressive selection of wine and rums.
  • The spa is famous on the island and mixes Eastern medicine with modern-day techniques.

You don’t go to an island like Anguilla to be stressed, and it seems that the team at Zemi Beach House is well aware of that. They work hard so you don’t have to.

When you think about Anguilla, you probably think about the big picture. You're probably after a beautiful beach, relaxing downtime, and maybe some delicious seafood or a cocktail on the beach. Zemi checks all these boxes, with white sand and warm blue water, relaxing quiet areas, and a food and beverage program to impress. But Zemi really shines because they've taken care of all the details you probably haven’t thought about yet.  Did you forget your sunscreen? Don’t worry, the beach concierge and pool cabanas have it stocked. Bad weather on your beach holiday? Try your private heated plunge pool instead.  Not sure what to do about child care? Stop by the Kid’s Club. 

Zemi Beach House shows a real commitment to covering all the guests’ needs to make their vacation a vacation. This is just the tip of the iceberg, or dune, of what Zemi offers. To learn everything Zemi can provide, read my full review below.

Courtesy of Zemi Beach House

With its palatial rooms and suites, Zemi Beach House will truly be your home away from home. Basic guest rooms start at 700 square feet, with suites up to 2,800 square feet. The larger suites have multiple bedrooms that can be locked off or added to house your entire family. They are all decorated slightly differently but include high-end accents that pay tribute to the sea and the surrounding island. Bathrooms have large tubs adorned with rubber duckies and Malin + Goetz toiletries. My suite included a living room and a stocked kitchen, with a fridge already full of various options. Freshly baked cookies are delivered every night during turndown service. 

One perk is that every room, no matter the size, includes a private patio or balcony. Also, every room size has an option for a private heated plunge pool. I stayed in a ground-level beachfront suite and could walk directly onto the beach from my patio. The proximity and access to the tranquil beach are unmatched, and there is nothing quite like waking up to the sound of waves at your back door.

Taylor McIntyre/Travel + Leisure

Bohio Lounge acts as the social center of the resort. It is located in the open air near the main pool and beach entrance and is equipped with a sushi bar and live music most nights. Bohio is the perfect spot for the sunset as the sunset sessions include passed tapas with your drink order every night. The cocktail list goes beyond the typical island rum punch with elevated cocktails that still have an island flair — I tried the Bergamont Sour that mixed Earl Grey-infused vodka with yuzu and banana. (The mocktail options are impressive, too, making it perfect for anyone in the family.)

However, the pride of the resort might be the Rhum Room. Home to more than 140 bottles of small-batch rums, The Rhum Room lets guests go on a tasting journey with the help of the “Rhummelier” to find their signature drink. The cozy interior is blue with pops of orange, creating an elegant speakeasy with nautical whimsy.

For dining, the main restaurant is 20 Knots, which is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The breakfast buffet goes above and beyond the standard hotel breakfast, with options like daily-made pastries and fresh coconuts. The lunch and dinner menu features classic dishes with a Caribbean flair. I was lucky enough to experience a tasting menu, and you really can’t go wrong, no matter what you order. They bake fantastic bread, which makes excellent pizza and pairs well with fresh hummus. The entrees are all hearty portions and delicious, but my favorites were the Zemi Specials, which included lobster macaroni and cheese, and the fisherman’s cataplana. 

For a fine dining experience, book a dinner reservation at Stone. The menu is Asian Caribbean fusion and changes seasonally. I started with the curried mussels, my absolute favorite of the night. Then, I had the incredibly fresh red snapper before finishing with the pistachio creme brulee. Stone also has a wine collection of 140 bottles, and the staff is happy to help you find the perfect pairing.  

If you’re heading to Anguilla, you probably want to spend some time in the sun. Zemi Beach House helps you maximize your time with four pools and direct access to the beach. The main pool is just past the restaurants and leads directly to the beach, while the adult pool — with a connecting lap pool — is on a terrace next to the gym. During my entire time at Zemi Beach House, the adult pool was a quiet oasis with cabanas always available. If you need an even more zen experience, there is a pool located in the spa area, which is sure to provide a relaxing experience. 

The gym is small but mighty, with several new machines, free weights, and treadmills. If you decide to break a sweat during your vacation, there are always towels and extra bottles of water.

The main star of the resort is the beach, Shoal Bay. A long strip of white sand and warm blue water hugs the coastline. The resort has several access points, and chairs and umbrellas are plentiful. The resort also has a beachfront concierge, who can lend equipment for water activities like kayaking, snorkeling, and paddle boarding. 

Other activities on the resort include a tennis court surrounded by a lush green jungle-like garden and the famous Anguilla Moke, a small vehicle available for rent to explore the island. Speaking of exploring, if you want to explore the island, Zemi can help with several activities, including boat tours to nearby cayes, games of golf, and sunset cruises.

One of the most unique parts of Zemi Beach House is the spa — in fact, it’s famous on the island. Zemi’s Thai Spa is an authentic 300-year-old Thai house transported from Thailand. The services here infuse Eastern medicine and traditional methods from the indigenous Taino people to provide a holistic spa experience. It is also home to the island’s only hammam, a Moroccan bathhouse, which is open to all if no scheduled treatments are occurring at that time. The spa also includes the vitality pool, kept at body temperature for a soothing, relaxing experience. 

Zemi has a Kid’s Club open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for children ages 4 to 12. Daily activities include everything from Mario Kart to mermaid experiences to coconut bowling. Zemi even offers kid-friendly cooking lessons. Multiple times during my stay, I overheard children excitedly telling their parents about their adventures at Kid’s Club that day. 

Zemi Beach House is the only resort in Anguilla that is run entirely on solar energy during the day. (It then switches to partial solar energy during the night.) But sustainability doesn’t end there. There are several measures the resort has taken to keep things energy efficient, including smart tech to adjust temperature and lights when no one is in the room and roofs designed to collect rainwater, which is then repurposed to irrigate landscaping.  Zemi has invested millions in sustainability and ongoing conservation efforts like untouched coastal areas and no-trespassing zones to allow sea turtles to nest. It also sources its produce locally and seasonally. 

As for accessibility, numerous golf carts roam the resort, and an accessible ride is always available and only a phone call away. There is one ADA-compliant room on Zemi’s property.

Zemi's main sticking point is getting to the island — there is just one daily flight to Anguilla from Miami. If you aren’t lucky enough to catch that flight, there are countless more direct flights into the nearby St. Maarten, and from there, charter boats run hourly. (The trip to Anguilla takes just 20 minutes.) Because arriving in St. Maarten is more common, Zemi offers a pre-arrival concierge to help guests make travel arrangements between the two islands. Once on Anguilla, Zemi is only a short taxi ride away. 

Zemi Beach House is part of LXR Hotels & Resorts, which is under the umbrella of the Hilton Honors reward program. Becoming a Hilton Honors member is easy, and being a part of the Hilton program also allows for a wide range of discounts and special offers when booking directly through Hilton — these offers range from hotel credits to discounts depending on the length of your stay. 

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Vacation like a celebrity: top travel hot spots for the rich and famous

Ben affleck, justin bieber and the kardashian sisters love to visit turks and caicos during the warmer months.

FOX Business’ Jeff Flock breaks down summer rental trends and what to know before booking a popular summer vacation destination.

Popular summer vacation destination tips and tricks

FOX Business’ Jeff Flock breaks down summer rental trends and what to know before booking a popular summer vacation destination.

With summer quickly approaching, social media will likely soon be filled with celebrities enjoying lavish vacations with their loved ones.

George and Amal Clooney frequently visit Lake Como during the warmer months. George even owns a home in the iconic Villa Oleandra in Northern Italy. 

According to Architectural Digest, Clooney purchased his mansion from the Heinz family in 2002 and frequently hosts guests, such as Prince Harry, Jennifer Aniston and Matt Damon, for an Italian getaway.

george and amal clooney and david and victoria beckham

George and Amal Clooney, left, enjoy visiting Lake Como, while David and Victoria Beckham are frequent visitors to the Maldives. (Getty Images / Getty Images)

Back when Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie were still married, the couple frequently made visits to Costa Rica and reportedly purchased a home there in 2011.

SMART TECH TIPS TO MAKE SUMMER TRAVEL CHEAPER AND LESS STRESSFUL

Here is a roundup of the top celebrity vacation hot spots to visit like the stars.

Lake Como, Italy

Aside from the Clooneys, Lake Como brings in a number of high-profile celebrities looking for a tranquil vacation away from the limelight.

Taylor Swift and Travis Kelce got an early start on their summer travel earlier this month and visited Lake Como. According to Elle, the couple were photographed enjoying a meal together and stayed at Grand Hotel Tremezzo’s Villa Sola Cabiati.

Architectural Digest reported that stars like Gwen Stefani and Natalie Portman opt to stay at the Grand Hotel Tremezzo when they visit Lake Como.

George Clooney and Amal Clooney in lake como

George Clooney and Amal Clooney are seen in Lake Como, Italy, on July 22, 2015. (Robino Salvatore/GC Images / Getty Images)

Jamie D'Aria, Travel Advisor for Travelmation , told FOX Business that Lake Como is the "quintessential private escape."

"Staff throughout the region make privacy a top priority, restricting access from outside guests and protecting the interests of their elite clientele," she explained. "You can choose to be a part of the scene, staying at famous resorts like Grand Tremezzo or il Sereno, or keep private in your own personal villa. Wherever you stay on the lake, you're captivated by the mountains and glistening lake as Italian speedboats pass by."  

D'Aria said that "we can all credit George Clooney for bringing extra attention to this treasured part of Italy." 

"Furthermore, today's social media culture is bringing even more notoriety to Lake Como — more and more people are flocking to the region trying to catch a glimpse into the lives of the rich and famous," she concluded.

Amalfi Coast

In July, Sofía Vergara celebrated her 51st birthday with a friend off the Amalfi Coast in Italy. 

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The former "Modern Family" star took to Instagram to share a carousel of images from her trip. "When life gives u lemons u come to Italy to squeeze them," Vergara captioned her post before tagging Hotel Villa Cimbrone.

She also shared an image of herself and friends enjoying the boat scene that the Amalfi Coast offers. The actress posed in a white one-piece bathing suit on a boat, captioning the images, "What a bday day!!!"

In 2021, model Christy Turlington took a trip to the Amalfi Coast and shared surreal images with her Instagram followers.

          View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Christy Turlington (@cturlington)

"Felt like stepping into a dream after so long but here’s proof that I was here and now there," Turlington captioned her post.

Travelmation's D'Aria explained that "the Amalfi Coast is known to be one of the most beautiful places in the world and has drawn Hollywood elite for decades."

"It's a very popular location for all tourists, but celebrities have a variety of ways to avoid the large crowds. They can rent a luxury villa that overlooks the gorgeous sea and dramatic cliffs," she continued. 

"Some even charter a lavish yacht and spend a majority of their time taking in the stunning views aboard the vessel. This is especially popular around the coast of Capri. The A-list can hire a staff, including private chefs, to cater to their every need."

The turquoise, picturesque water seen in the Maldives is a major attraction for travelers, including celebrities. 

          View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Gwyneth Paltrow (@gwynethpaltrow)

In 2019, Gwyneth Paltrow and husband Brad Falchuck got up close and personal to the gorgeous water on a trip to the remote islands in the Indian Ocean, which is the smallest country in Asia.

"Farewell to these beautiful atolls of peace," Paltrow captioned her post. The Goop founder hashtagged Soneva Jani, the hotel where the couple stayed during their trip.

Maldives

Maldives beach. (DEA/M. Borchi/De Agostini via Getty Images / Getty Images)

The unreal resort consists of 24 villas that sit above the crystal-clear waters in the Maldives.

David and Victoria Beckham have frequented the Maldives for years and stay at the same resort where Paltrow stayed, Soneva Jani, per the Daily Mail. The outlet noted that the Beckhams have stayed at the upscale resort for years during their trips to the region.

Sarah Basham, Travel Advisor for Travelmation, told FOX Business that "the Maldives concept of only one resort per island makes it one of the most exclusive locations in the world."

David and Victoria Beckham red carpet

David and Victoria Beckham reportedly stay at the Soneva Jani resort. (Stephane Cardinale - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images / Getty Images)

"With resort guests and staff being the only people allowed on private islands, the Maldives offer the ideal destination for celebrities seeking seclusion and solitude," she explained. "Exquisite dining and personalized service are hallmarks of many Maldives resorts." 

Basham continued, "The Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi, for example, boasts a private island with several villas, swimming pools, a dedicated chef and a personal concierge, taking exclusivity to a whole new level. This island getaway is the ideal destination for any A-lister wanting to unwind as a couple, family, or group of friends in one of the world's most alluring locations."

In summer 2022, Reese Witherspoon visited Costa Rica, and after her stay, shared that she feels "like a new person!"

People reported that the actress stayed at the Hacienda AltaGracia hotel during her 2022 trip to Costa Rica. The hotel operates as a coffee farm and offers 50 casitas for travelers who want a more private, luxury resort. 

          View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Reese Witherspoon (@reesewitherspoon)

The hotel is nestled in the mountains of Pérez Zeledón in the rainforest of Costa Rica. According to the resort's website , stays range from around $1,200 to around $5,300 per night.

Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Karen Kroeter, Director of Global Luxury Travel for Travelmation, told FOX Business that Jackson Hole, Wyoming, "gives celebrities a total escape from the chaos of that Hollywood lifestyle."

"High-end clients can take in the natural beauty from a private ranch where no fans or paparazzi can find them! The fresh air and expansive space allows them total relaxation they cannot find in many places," she explained. "There are also many options for luxury accommodations that lean into serenity, fine dining and 5-star concierge service." 

Kroeter continued, "Want an exclusive tour of Yellowstone National Park? That can be arranged. How about elite ski lessons from top professionals? That's no problem. This is truly a retreat that more and more luxury clients are seeking." 

Jackson Hole Wyoming

Two moose walk through a pasture as autumn arrives in Grand Teton National Park in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. (George Rose/Getty Images / Getty Images)

"When you get to Jackson Hole for the first time, many people think, 'How could I have not known this existed?' It's one of my favorite comments from clients," Kroeter said. "Jackson Hole can be the exhale that you need to reconnect with yourself, your family and nature, but it's also a dream for adventure seekers."

Last year, Ryan Gosling took his wife, Eva Mendes, and their daughters on a vacation to Jackson Hole.

A source told People that the Gosling family was spotted there around the time Ryan's hit "Barbie" film was released in theaters.

Ryan Gosling

Ryan Gosling and his family took a vacation to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, in 2023. (Michael Buckner/Penske Media via Getty Images / Getty Images)

"Of all the places he could go to wind down after his whole ‘Barbie’ tour, he picked Jackson. It’s so peaceful here," the source told the outlet. "People like it because you can fly under the radar. It’s such a small community."

Another source told the outlet that Gosling, Mendes and their daughters Esmeralda and Amada stayed at the five-star Jackson Hole's Teton Village. The source said the hotel "is where a lot of celebrities stay in the village — it’s a members’ club and you can get a place there as well."

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West

Kim Kardashian confirmed that Kanye West purchased a ranch in Wyoming in 2019. (Rich Fury/VF20/Getty Images for Vanity Fair / Getty Images)

The ability for people to be able to "fly under the radar" in Jackson Hole might be intriguing for A-list stars looking for a peaceful trip.

The Kardashian family was also seen taking a trip to the luxurious boutique hotel called Caldera House during an episode of "Keeping Up with the Kardashians" in 2019.

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Kim Kardashian and Kanye West spent a lot of time together on their ranch in Jackson Hole prior to their divorce. Kardashian confirmed on NBC's "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" in 2019 that her then-husband purchased a ranch in Wyoming.

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In 2019 and 2020, Kardashian frequently shared photos of her kids riding horses and enjoying nature in Wyoming. She and West share four children: North, Saint, Chicago and Psalm.

Turks and Caicos

According to Travel + Leisure, celebrities love Turks and Caicos Islands due to the peaceful, relaxed ambiance. The magazine compared Turks and Caicos Islands to St. Bart's and noted that the nightlife scene is not as prominent on the islands in the British Overseas Territory.

Stars like Ben Affleck, Justin Bieber and Kylie and Kendall Jenner have taken trips to Turks and Caicos to experience all the islands have to offer.

Ben Affleck, Jennifer Garner

Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner tied the knot in Turks and Caicos in 2005. (Marc Piasecki/FilmMagic / Getty Images)

Affleck and his former wife, Jennifer Garner, tied the knot in Parrot Cay, located on Turks and Caicos, in 2005 after one year of dating. 

In 2021, E! News reported that Hailey and Justin Bieber traveled to Turks and Caicos. A source told the outlet at the time, "They got in some much needed vacation time and seemed to enjoy their stay. They took walks on the beach and a private boat trip to go snorkeling."

Justin and Hailey Bieber

Justin and Hailey Bieber reportedly took a trip to Turks and Caicos in 2021. (Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Roc Nation / Getty Images)

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The eyewitness source continued, "They walked on the rocks and looked for crabs and seashells. They swam in the ocean and took naps on the beach. They seem very happy and like they are best friends."

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barrys bay ontario

Quaint gem of a small town is a gateway to Ontario's most famous provincial park

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The small communities surrounding Algonquin Provincial Park offer some beautifully quaint little towns to begin your journey deep into the province's hinterland, like the sleepy community of Barry's Bay, Ontario.

A small town with a population of around 1,300 located within the township of Madawaska Valley, about 300 km northeast of Toronto, Barry's Bay is a quiet stop along Ontario Highway 60.

Highway 60 is best known as the primary road passing through scenic Algonquin Park, but its stretch through Barry's Bay acts as one of the town's primary thoroughfares, dotted with charming shops, cafes and architecture that adds to the small-town Ontario vibe.

The waterfront community on the shores of Kamaniskeg Lake and is home to cute accommodations like rentable cottages, inns and small hotels.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Carley Fortune (@carleyfortune)

Before trekking into the wilderness of Algonquin, visitors to Barry's Bay might want to check out Mask Island, a small farming community connected to the mainland via a causeway.

Aside from its plentiful natural features and access to nearby Algonquin, the town's best known attraction is its restored historic train station, which houses a visitor centre.

barrys bay ontario

Farutxo/Shutterstock

Hockey culture is also deeply rooted in the community, earning the town a position as a finalist in the 2006 edition of CBC's annual Hockeyville competition.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Madawaska Kanu Centre (@madawaskakanu)

Other year-round fun in Barry's Bay includes an aviation-themed park built in honour of a test pilot who worked on the legendary Avro Arrow program. Zurakowski Park — named in honour of Arrow chief test pilot and Barry's Bay local, Janusz Żurakowski — features a mock-up of the iconic but ill-fated domestic fighter jet.

Eric Fabian / Shutterstock.com

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