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Atchafalaya NHA Field Trips (44 Total)

The office of Tourism in Louisiana presents one of the most complete and wonderful lists of field trips available in our fair state.  Please find below links to complete details for educational or family field trips to any of the more than 40 different destinations across the Atchafalaya National Heritage Area.

Please select from the list below to view complete details:

Field Trips ( 45 )

Please select from the list below to view complete details.

vermilionville field trip

THE PUBLIC TRAVELER

Sunset in Tahoe

  • May 1, 2023

Vermilionville: Exploring Louisiana’s Rich Cultural Heritage

Updated: May 26, 2023

As a travel blogger and photographer, I've had the opportunity to explore some of the most beautiful and fascinating places in the world. But there's something truly special about Louisiana, a state that's filled with so much history, culture, and charm. And one of the best places to experience all of this is at Vermilionville, a living history museum that takes visitors on a journey through Louisiana's past.

vermilionville field trip

A Detailed History

Vermilionville began as a project of the University of Southwestern Louisiana (now the University of Louisiana at Lafayette) in the 1970s. The goal was to create a living history museum that would showcase the region’s unique Cajun and Creole cultures. The museum was officially opened in 1990, and has since become a popular destination for visitors from around the world.

vermilionville field trip

Vermilionville has a rich and fascinating history that spans several centuries. The area where the museum is located was once home to the Attakapas Native American tribe, who lived off the land and fished the nearby bayou. In the 18th century, French settlers arrived in the area and established a trading post on the banks of the Vermilion River, which eventually grew into the town of Lafayette.

vermilionville field trip

During the 19th century, the Acadian or Cajun people began arriving in Louisiana after being exiled from their homes in Canada by the British. Many settled in the area around Lafayette, bringing with them their unique culture, language, and traditions. The Cajuns made their living by farming, fishing, and trapping, and their way of life evolved to reflect the challenges and opportunities of the Louisiana landscape.

vermilionville field trip

In the late 20th century, the Vermilionville Historic Village was established as a way to preserve and celebrate Louisiana’s cultural heritage. The museum features historic buildings and artifacts that showcase the daily lives of the Cajun and Creole people who lived in the area, from the early 1800s to the early 1900s.

vermilionville field trip

Visitors to Vermilionville can explore a variety of historic structures, including a general store, schoolhouse, blacksmith shop, and several homes. Many of these buildings have been restored to their original condition and furnished with period-appropriate items, providing a glimpse into what life was like for the people who lived and worked there.

vermilionville field trip

Overall, Vermilionville’s history is closely intertwined with that of Louisiana itself. From the Native American tribes who first called the area home, to the French and Cajun settlers who built thriving communities there, the museum is a testament to the resilience, creativity, and adaptability of the people who have lived in this unique corner of the world.

vermilionville field trip

Cultural Information

Cajun and Creole cultures are an integral part of Louisiana’s history and identity. Cajuns are descendants of French colonists who settled in the region in the 18th century, and their culture is heavily influenced by French traditions. Creoles, on the other hand, are descendants of the French, Spanish, and African settlers who lived in the area during the colonial period. Their culture is a blend of European, African, and Native American influences.

vermilionville field trip

At Vermilionville, visitors can experience the region’s cultural heritage firsthand. The museum consists of a collection of historic buildings that have been moved to the site from around the region. These buildings include homes, schools, and churches, and have been carefully restored to their original condition. Inside the buildings, visitors can see authentic period furnishings and artifacts that help bring the history of the region to life.

Compelling Reasons to Visit Vermilionville There are many reasons to visit Vermilionville, but here are just a few:

Cultural immersion: Vermilionville offers a unique opportunity to immerse yourself in the region’s Cajun and Creole cultures. From the architecture to the artifacts, everything about the museum is designed to transport visitors back in time and give them a sense of what life was like in Louisiana centuries ago.

Educational experience: Vermilionville is not just a museum, but an educational experience. Visitors can learn about the history and culture of Louisiana through interactive exhibits, live demonstrations, and guided tours.

Authentic cuisine: No trip to Louisiana would be complete without sampling the local cuisine, and Vermilionville offers some of the best. The on-site restaurant, La Cuisine de Maman, serves up authentic Cajun and Creole dishes made from fresh, locally sourced ingredients.

Beautiful setting: The museum is situated on 23 acres of scenic Bayou Vermilion property, with lush gardens and beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. Visitors can take a leisurely stroll through the grounds, or even take a boat tour of the bayou.

Special events: Vermilionville hosts a variety of special events throughout the year, including music festivals, art exhibits, and cultural celebrations. Some of the most popular events include the Cajun & Creole Christmas, which features holiday music, crafts, and food, and the Bayou Vermilion Festival & Boat Parade, which celebrates the beauty and importance of the bayou.

Interactive exhibits: Vermilionville’s exhibits are not just static displays, but interactive experiences that allow visitors to engage with the history and culture of Louisiana. For example, visitors can try their hand at making traditional crafts like pottery and weaving, or learn how to play the fiddle or accordion.

Guided tours: For those who want a more in-depth experience, Vermilionville offers guided tours led by knowledgeable docents who can provide additional context and insight into the museum’s exhibits. Tours are available for both individuals and groups, and can be customized to suit specific interests or needs.

Preservation efforts: In addition to showcasing Louisiana’s cultural heritage, Vermilionville is also dedicated to preserving it. The museum works with local organizations and experts to restore historic buildings and artifacts, and to ensure that traditional crafts and skills are passed down to future generations.

vermilionville field trip

A Day at Vermilionville

From the moment you arrive at Vermilionville, you'll feel like you've stepped back in time. The smell of fresh bread baking in the outdoor oven, the sound of musicians playing traditional Cajun music, and the sight of farm animals grazing in the fields all come together to create a truly immersive experience.

As you explore the grounds, you'll have the opportunity to interact with costumed interpreters who bring Louisiana's history to life. From the Cajun schoolhouse to the Creole cottage, every building tells a different story about life in Louisiana during the 18th and 19th centuries.

vermilionville field trip

Top 10 Reasons Why Visitors Should Visit Vermilionville:

Immerse yourself in Cajun and Creole culture

Learn about Louisiana's rich history and heritage

Explore the beautiful gardens and grounds

Enjoy live music performances

Experience hands-on demonstrations of traditional crafts

Take a boat ride on the Bayou Vermilion

Attend one of the many festivals and events held throughout the year

Shop for unique souvenirs at the gift shop

Learn how to dance the Cajun two-step

Enjoy delicious Cajun and Creole cuisine

vermilionville field trip

Top 10 Interesting Facts about Vermilionville:

Vermilionville is a living history museum that depicts the Acadian, Creole, and Native American cultures of South Louisiana.

The village was originally built in 1990 as a celebration of Lafayette's bicentennial and has since grown into a popular tourist destination.

The buildings in Vermilionville are authentic, and many of them were moved from other locations in South Louisiana.

The village is located on the Bayou Vermilion, which was once an important transportation route for settlers in the area.

Vermilionville has a blacksmith shop, a chapel, a schoolhouse, and several homes that are open for visitors to explore.

The village hosts numerous events and festivals throughout the year, including a Cajun Christmas celebration and a Mardi Gras parade.

Visitors can take a guided tour of the village or explore on their own.

Vermilionville is home to several gardens, including a medicinal plant garden and a kitchen garden.

The village has a restaurant that serves traditional Cajun and Creole cuisine.

Vermilionville is a popular destination for school field trips and educational tours.

vermilionville field trip

Helpful Insider Travel Tips:

Wear comfortable shoes as there is a lot of walking involved.

Don't forget to bring sunscreen and bug spray, especially during the summer months.

Check the schedule for live music performances and demonstrations before your visit.

Take a boat ride on the Bayou Vermilion for a unique perspective of the area.

The village can get crowded on weekends and during festivals, so plan accordingly.

vermilionville field trip

Top Things to Do for Free:

Explore the grounds and gardens of Vermilionville

Attend a live music performance or craft demonstration

Take a self-guided tour of the village

Picnic in one of the many outdoor areas

Watch the boats go by on the Bayou Vermilion

vermilionville field trip

Money Saving Tips:

Visit on a weekday to avoid crowds and potentially lower admission prices.

Pack a picnic instead of eating at the restaurant.

Look for discounts or promotions on the Vermilionville website or social media pages.

vermilionville field trip

Getting There:

Vermilionville is located in Lafayette, Louisiana, and is easily accessible by car. It is approximately a two-hour drive from New Orleans and a three-hour drive from Houston.

How Much Time to Spend There:

Plan to spend at least two hours exploring the village and grounds, but you could easily spend a full day if you attend live performances and demonstrations or take a boat ride on the Bayou Vermilion.

vermilionville field trip

Safety Tips:

Wear comfortable shoes and dress appropriately for the weather, as much of the attraction is outdoors.

Be mindful of your belongings and keep an eye on your valuables.

Stay hydrated and bring sunscreen and bug spray, especially during the warmer months.

Follow all posted signs and warnings, especially around water and wildlife areas.

If you're visiting at night for a special event, be sure to park in a well-lit area and travel in groups for safety.

vermilionville field trip

The Best Place to Eat Nearby and Why

There are plenty of great restaurants to choose from in the Lafayette area, but if you're looking for a true taste of Louisiana cuisine, look no further than the on-site restaurant at Vermilionville, La Cuisine de Maman. This charming restaurant serves up traditional Cajun and Creole dishes made with fresh, locally sourced ingredients. From gumbo to jambalaya, crawfish étouffée to red beans and rice, there's something for every palate. Plus, the restaurant's cozy atmosphere and friendly service make for a truly enjoyable dining experience.

vermilionville field trip

Hours and Reservations

Vermilionville is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10am to 4pm. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, and $6 for children ages 6-12. Children under 6 get in free. Please note that hours and admission prices are subject to change, so be sure to check the Vermilionville website or call ahead to confirm before your visit.

vermilionville field trip

Vermilionville offers visitors a truly unique glimpse into the rich history and culture of Louisiana. From the fascinating exhibits to the live music and dance performances, there's something for everyone to enjoy. Whether you're a history buff, a music lover, or just looking to soak up some Louisiana charm, Vermilionville is not to be missed. So what are you waiting for? Come on down to Lafayette and experience the magic of Vermilionville for yourself!

Disclaimer: The information in this post was factual to the best of our knowledge at the time of publication. However, hours of operation, prices, and other details are subject to change, so be sure to call ahead or visit the Vermilionville website to confirm before visiting.

vermilionville field trip

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This Museum In Louisiana Will Make You Feel Like You've Been Transported Through Time

vermilionville field trip

Louisiana native and LSU Alum (Geaux Tigers!), Jackie has lived in Louisiana for over three decades and currently lives in New Orleans. She's been writing for OnlyInYourState since 2016 and can often be found with a coffee at her side, dreaming of her next adventure.

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History lovers, this one is for you. Louisiana has countless museums peppered throughout the state, and each one is worthy of a visit. There’s a little-known living history museum right smack dab in the middle of Cajun Country, and you need to check it out. This tiny little village will make you feel like you’ve been transported through time, and it’s a great family-friendly attraction that visitors of all ages will enjoy.

vermilionville field trip

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vermilionville field trip

Be sure to check out their website and follow them on Facebook for more information.

Have you ever been to Vermilionville? Share your experience with us in the comments below!

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Everything you want to know about our 50-mile paddle down the Vermilion

vermilionville field trip

Last week we embarked on the Vermilion Voyage , where about 20 people paddled 50 miles over three days down the Vermilion River.

You might have a few questions about our trip (like what possessed us to do such a thing), so we figured we'd go ahead and answer them up front.

Also, check out the gorgeous photos by Melinda Martinez, my friend, coworker and partner on this canoeing adventure. A photo gallery is embedded below.

Here are some of the questions I've gotten so far.

Why would you do this?

I just wanted to try it, to see if I could do it. It was definitely a challenge, especially the two days we faced strong headwinds. But it might be the coolest thing I've ever done. And I felt like I accomplished something unique and tough afterward.

It has inspired me to get out on the water more, in smaller increments, and to keep trying new things. I hope it inspires you to do the same.

Where did you sleep?

Melinda and I shared a tent that I've had for years, and I learned my husband and I have been putting it together incorrectly (just a little). The first night we were all at Southside Park on the edge of Lafayette. Then we camped on land next to the Richard's Sale Barn that I believe they cleared just for us. And our last night we camped at Palmetto Island State Park in Abbeville.

What did you do at night?

The organizers packed our schedule with some very cool things. We paddled during the day and enjoyed entertainment and food at night.

We enjoyed a pop-up screening of a documentary on skiff-building Thursday night. Southern Screen projected the short film "In the Mind of the Maker" with the actual river in the background. Director Charles Richard was on hand to answer questions and talk about upcoming projects. 

Friday we stopped at Dockside Studio to see where Grammy winners have recorded. And that night's entertainment was as cool as the venue. The historic sale barn once hosted auctioneers, but Roddie Romero took the stage instead. The building is small and provided an intimate atmosphere for the concert.

I know I keep saying "cool," but I can't find a better word for each part of this trip. (Except the wind. It literally was cool, but not figuratively.)

MORE:  We went to the 'edge of Louisiana' for this state park  |  See all 21 Louisiana state parks

What did you eat? How was the food?

The food was the best part of the trip. Every single bite was amazing, from the spicy red beans and rice at Vermilionville to Olympic Grove's salami and hot honey pizza to the smoked grass-fed beef burgers from Bœuf de Bacqué.

Even the breakfast burritos and turkey sandwiches our guides made for us were awesome. It helped that we had burned a million calories (give or take) paddling and working up an appetite, but I'm pretty sure they would have tasted that good anyway.

What was your first meal after you got back?

I tried El Pollo Loco for the first time and really liked it. The best part, though, was the Dr. Pepper. That's my vice, and I'd gone without one until the last day of the trip.

How did your family do without you for four days?

They did just fine. My mother-in-law came to help and take our girls to school, so my husband could still get to work on time. It takes a village, and we've got a great one.

Were your kids happy to see you?

They were, but not as happy as I had expected. This was my first time away from my girls, ages 3 and 1, for three nights in a row. It didn't seem to faze them like it did Momma.

How do I prepare for a trip like this?

Get some paddling experience before you try to conquer 50 miles. Even when it's spread over three days, it's tough, and we encountered headwinds, which I was so not prepared for.

You can't really plan a trip around wind. As organizer Greg Guidroz put it, "Each trip is a whole new river." 

So start small and build up. Our first chunk of mileage was from the Nature Station in Lafayette, where you can camp and launch, to Vermilionville, where we had parked our cars that morning. That's easily accessible and a good distance to try for a day trip. 

This challenge is not for everyone. Think of it a bit like a long-distance race. I do half-marathons and believe most people can do those — with training. That's key.

Will there be another trip like this?

Yes. This was the inaugural Vermilion Voyage, and we all basically signed up to be guinea pigs. Lafayette Travel and the Bayou Vermilion District are planning to do this every year. Consider us "season one" of a great new series.

What was the best part?

My favorite thing about this is that it all was a new experience for me.

Yes, I've canoed before, and, yes, I've camped and eaten red beans and rice. But I'd never canoed the Vermilion before. I'd never been on the water for three consecutive days.

I'd never paddled so far. I'd never stayed in a tent three nights in a row. I'd never spent that much time with Melinda (we got along great and nobody tried to kill anyone).

I'd never eaten Vermilionville's spicy red beans (amazing) or seen Roddie Romero play. I'd never met any of these people but Melinda and the two organizers. 

It's quite a thing to have so many new experiences rolled into one trip. It took me out of my comfort zone and brought new people into my life. As Greg told me, my community grew this week.

Plus, it was gorgeous out there. The colors were vibrant — clear blue sky, rich green leaves and the signature tan that is Louisiana water. It even glittered in the sun.

Who else went?

I met so many great people!

We all came from different decades and walks of life. From 18 to 68 we had someone in their teens, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s. There were a few married couples. Some folks came as individuals and were paired with a canoe partner.

There were these two friends who someone named "the Traceys" before we all said our names, and they were a hoot. They do adventures like this all the time, just to say they did it, and they wear matching shirts to add flair.

Their first outfit of the voyage featured their motto on the back — "Bad choices make great stories." Don't you want to know them?

Some worked in offices, or from home, in classrooms, in the oil and gas industry, in tourism — it was a mix. We all brought something different to the campfire.

Who traveled the farthest?

A couple who used to live in Lafayette came back to Acadiana for the first time since moving to Houston.

This was a good excuse to return for a long weekend. Most of our group came from around Acadiana — Broussard, Crowley, Grand Coteau. Melinda came from Alexandria.

But the clear winner is a father and son duo who drove from Cincinnati, Ohio.

The dad won their spot on the trip through a contest. He clicked on a link, not even sure it was real, but went ahead and applied. Then boom, they were heading to Lafayette. 

His son wasn't surprised, though. His dad wins stuff like this all the time, he said. It turned out to be a unique birthday present for the son, Blake, who turned 18 the first day of the trip.

Did you see any alligators or snakes?

I saw a lot of what I call logs-not-alligators and sticks-not-snakes. Those are the ones that look convincingly like the reptile and not the wood until you're right on top of them.

We saw a baby gator our last morning swimming near the campsite at Palmetto Island State Park. I think the guys from Cincinnati were disappointed we didn't see more. I was not.

Did the water smell?

I didn't think so. Sometimes we smelled gas from tractors or possibly a factory. We definitely smelled (and saw) some cows in the rural patches along the river.

I didn't get in the water and stir it up, though.

Did you see trash in the water? 

Yes, unfortunately.

Some stretches were worse than others. Mainly we saw plastic or glass bottles (and I don't mean the ones used to tie a line to), but we did see a really big old TV smack in the middle of the river. So let's all agree to do better going forward and not litter.

Are you sore? 

So sore. We worked really hard, especially on the windy days.

There were times we were paddling our hearts out only to stay still. Once or twice we went backwards. But at the end of the day we felt like beasts.

Melinda and I were among the slowest paddlers by the end of the trip, but we also were the only canoe with two women and lots of gear.

We decided our gear was the equivalent of a third person doing absolutely no work. But maybe it just felt like that.

Did you forget anything?

Chapstick! Y'all, that was awful. Thankfully one of my new friends gave me hers the last day. 

I also should have packed a coffee cup, but again, people shared. You can absolutely drink coffee out of a wine glass.

There were things I packed that I didn't use, too. I didn't need my sandals, but hey, we used my pocketknife to slice an avocado.

Would you do it again?

I think this was a one-and-done thing for me. I saw it as a bucket list item. I'm thankful to have scratched it off and am looking forward to the next thing.

But... ask me again next year.

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Louisiana's Cajun Country Is So Much More Than Gumbo and Gators — Though They've Got Those, Too

Most travelers come to southern Louisiana expecting to find gumbo, accordions, and maybe a few gators. But the mix is far richer.

The southwestern region of Louisiana is officially called Acadiana, but when I told people I was planning a road trip there, I found myself saying, "I'm going to Cajun country." I was drawn to the region's heritage, and hoped to eat Cajun food, listen to zydeco, maybe head out on the swamp. What I didn't expect: soul-stirring natural beauty and a unique community, with a layered history that continues to thrive and adapt.

I was traveling with my friend Katherine, who lives in New Orleans . Together, we set off on the three-hour drive to Lafayette Parish, which welcomes roughly 3 million people each year. Here, in the center of Acadiana, there are weekly Rendez-vous des Cajuns concerts, which showcase the region's fiddle-and-accordion-driven music, and cultural events like the Festivals Acadiens et Créoles .

Canadians make up the largest group of international visitors, which makes sense. The word Cajun is an anglicization of Acadien, the French Catholic ethnic group that, in the 18th century, was expelled from eastern Canada by the British in what became known as Le Grand Dérangement, or the Great Upheaval. Thousands ended up on the bayous of Catholic, French-speaking Louisiana.

Our first stop was Vermilionville , on the outskirts of the city of Lafayette . This living-history museum showcases the groups that resided along Bayou Vermilion in the late 18th and the 19th centuries. In the old schoolhouse, Katherine and I were surprised to see the chalkboard filled with a repeated line, "I will not speak French on the school grounds." Evidently, the current celebration of Cajun culture is a renaissance, a response to a time when that heritage was denigrated. (English was mandatory in Louisiana public schools from 1921 until 1974, leading to a significant decline in the population of native French speakers by 2010.) Today, there's a concerted effort to bring back the culture, the language — even the Acadian brown cotton spun by the refugees.

But while the Acadian experience is an important story, it's not the whole story. Outsiders often conflate the Cajun and Creole cultures (and cuisines) of Louisiana, and it's true that the definitions can be slippery. In Louisiana, the term Creole refers to "the children of the colonies" — the descendants of those who lived in the area during European colonial rule. Vermilionville is a site of many histories: Native American, French, Spanish, West African.

"The Acadians didn't get here until 1764," D'Jalma Garnier III, a Creole musician at Vermilionville, told us. "People think gumbo is Cajun," he added. "It's from Senegal! Gumbo comes from the West African word for okra." Before European colonization, Louisiana was home to more than a dozen tribes, including the Chitimacha and Choctaw. The French brought enslaved Africans, who were forced to work the indigo and tobacco fields alongside captive native peoples. Whether they were there by choice or by force, each group added its own traditions to Louisiana, creating something entirely new — or, as Garnier put it, creolizing. "I like to spread our créolité," he said, playing a Creole tune with "clear Caribbean African" roots.

Like Creole music, the rest of our trip was partly improvised. We took an airboat ride on the bayou — having signed a waiver absolving our guides of responsibility for the actions of mosquitoes, alligators, and Asian carp, which tend to jump out of the water and into your lap. What struck me even more than airborne fish was the serene beauty of the Atchafalaya Swamp — the country's largest wetland, situated between Lafayette and Baton Rouge. The sound of flapping alerted us to the presence of egrets, their flight rippling the reflection of cypress trees in the water.

Lush nature surrounded us again at Rip Van Winkle Gardens , 15 acres of semitropical parkland on the banks of Lake Peigneur, half an hour south of Lafayette. Home to roseate spoonbills, white egrets, and peacocks, the property is also the site of an 1870 Steamboat Gothic-style house built for Joseph Jefferson, an actor who became famous touring the country in an adaptation of the Rip Van Winkle story. The gardens are actually located on Jefferson Island — which isn't an island at all, but one of five salt domes, mounds of minerals pushing up through the sedimentary rock, that are attached to the shore of the lake. Some of them formed traps for oil and natural gas, and in 1980, a salt mine under Jefferson Island collapsed after being punctured by a Texaco drilling rig. The Jefferson home was spared, but as Lake Peigneur drained into the breached mine, it became a whirlpool, swallowing up another house recently built on its banks. Today, only the house's chimney stands, rising mournfully out of the water.

The next night, at the Wednesday Cajun Jam at the Blue Moon Saloon , in Lafayette, fiddlers and accordionists accompanied a twenty-something woman singing in French as Katherine accepted an older gentleman's invitation to dance. He turned out to be an engineer who had come here in 1970 to work for Morton Salt, and remembers the day the dome collapsed. It was one of a few coincidences that left me feeling Acadiana was a place where the past two-steps with the present.

We spent our last day kayaking among the tupelo and cypress on Lake Martin, following Janenne deClouet, founder of Duc in Altum tours and a paddling philosopher who believes in the healing power of nature. "It's kind of a ministry," she said of guiding kayakers. "You get people out into Creation and see them rest." As we rowed, she showed us alligators, egrets, and duck blinds, then pointed to a leaning cypress that formed a sort of arch. "I call this the torii gate of the lake."

It echoed the bright red, and entirely real, Shinto gate we had seen at Jungle Gardens on Avery Island, another salt dome about an hour south of Lafayette. (It's most famous for being home to the Tabasco factory. The torii leads the way to a 900-year-old Buddha, a gift to hot-sauce scion Edward Avery McIlhenny in 1936.) "When you pass through the torii," deClouet said, "you let something go that has been weighing you down."

Once a year, deClouet helps lead the Eucharistic boat procession along nearby Bayou Teche that celebrates the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. Acadiana is deeply attached to the Catholic faith of its French forebears — and yet the ancient Buddha appears at home here, too. We had come to learn one people's story and, instead, discovered something richer: that everywhere we went and everyone we met was a living embodiment of this region's créolité.

Cajun Country Must-Sees

Where to stay.

Spend a night in Lafayette, a city of 125,000 at the center of Acadiana. There are chain hotels, but we loved the food-focused Maison Madeleine just outside town. Don't miss the Jesus Bar, a cocktail spot filled with Catholic icons occupying an outbuilding on the property. Near Avery Island, Olive Branch Cottages , which once housed cane cutters, has a canoe for paddling on Bayou Teche.

Where to Eat and Drink

In Lafayette, the elegant Café Vermilionville serves old-school fare like alligator Dijon and duck roulade. The Cajun Jam at the Blue Moon Saloon is the place to be on Wednesdays. For nouveau Cajun cuisine, try Café Sydnie Mae , in Breaux Bridge. Near Abbeville, close to Avery Island, Suire's Grocery , a plate-lunch general store famous for its turtle sauce picante and pecan pies, is the best kind of throwback.

Rip Van Winkle Gardens is a fascinating piece of Jefferson Island history. You can even rent a cottage there and wake up to peacocks outside your window. Jungle Gardens , on Avery Island, is known for its bird-watching and wildlife. Head out onto the bayou with McGee's Louisiana Swamp & Airboat Tours , which offers airboat, motorboat, and canoe tours helmed by Cajun guides. Duc in Altum leads small-group kayaking excursions and photography tours. For an immersive understanding of Acadiana's complex past, the living-history museum at Vermilionville is an essential stop.

A version of this story first appeared in the April 2020 issue of Travel + Leisure under the headline Born on the Bayou. The Lafayette Convention and Visitors Commission provided support for the reporting of this story.

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Vermilionville

The Artisans who work daily in the park provide a glimpse back to a time gone by where Acadians, Creoles and Native Americans provided for themselves and their families.  

The story of the Healer’s Garden began in August of 2010 when Dr. C. Ray Brassieur, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (ULL) and President of the Vermilionville Living History Museum Foundation Board, spoke to the LPMGA membership about his vision to build a medicinal garden at Vermilionville.

Historic Homes

The Vermilionville Living History Museum and Folklife Park is one of the world’s largest physical representations of an early Acadian settlement using original structures dating from 1765 to 1890.

Vermilionville has a myriad of breathtaking exhibits. Take a look today to discover a glimpse into the past of Acadiana, and be sure to plan your next visit to Vermilionville.

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  1. Environmental Science Field Trips

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  2. Vermilionville Historic Village Tours

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  3. Plan Your Trip to Vermilionville Historic Village: 3 Tips for Visitors

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  4. Vermilionville Summer Camp 2022

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  5. Recreation

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  6. Tour of Vermilionville, Louisiana!

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VIDEO

  1. Meet Your Neighbor: Earth Day 2024 at Vermilionville

  2. VERMILIONVILLE,LAFAYETTE,LA

  3. JASON FREY-JC LEGER- 5 11 24

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  5. KYLE HUVAL 3 16 2024

  6. JASON FREY-JC LEGER- 5 11 24

COMMENTS

  1. Field Trip Packages

    The Vermilionville Living History Museum and Folklife park provide a wonderful educational experience for children and young adults. Combining school field trips with the educational aspects provided in classroom create a sense of historical relevance.

  2. Visit

    Our operation hours are from 10 AM - 4 PM, Tuesday - Sunday. Adult Admission $10. Adult Admission: $8*. Enhancements: $3 per person. Meal prices for Le Cuisine de Maman are included below. * Discount applied for groups of 20 or more. **Tickets for the tour operator and motor coach operator are always complimentary at Vermilionville.

  3. Vermilionville

    Vermilionville is open six days a week, Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Please keep in mind that we stop taking admission at 3:00 p.m. daily as it takes approximately an hour to an hour and thirty minutes to tour our historic village. Our historic village is closed on Mondays and for major holidays including New Year's Eve ...

  4. Vermilionville Living History Museum & Folklife Park

    Vermilionville is a 23-acre historic and folklife park along the banks of the Bayou Vermilion that depicts the Acadian, Creole and Native American cultures from the time period 1765 - 1890. This historic village features guided tours, costumed artisans, live music, cooking school, dance lessons, and a gift shop that will leave you overjoyed with history and culture.

  5. Field Trips

    Vermilionville: Lafayette: Vermilionville features several acres of history with 18 structures, including six original period homes, a schoolhouse, blacksmith forge and a chapel. ... This field trip destination is about historical and natural resources that tell the story of the people who settled along the bayous, swamps and wetlands of ...

  6. VERMILIONVILLE: All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

    Vermilionville. 881 reviews. #2 of 73 things to do in Lafayette. Historic Walking Areas. Closed now. 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Write a review. About. Get a taste of life for the 18th-century Acadian settlers in this 23-acre village with meticulously recreated period homes, costumed staff demonstrating arts and crafts and a restaurant serving Cajun ...

  7. Vermilionville: Exploring Louisiana's Rich Cultural Heritage

    Vermilionville is home to several gardens, including a medicinal plant garden and a kitchen garden. The village has a restaurant that serves traditional Cajun and Creole cuisine. Vermilionville is a popular destination for school field trips and educational tours.

  8. Vermilionville

    Vermilionville is open six days a week, Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please keep in mind that we stop taking admission at 3 p.m. daily as it takes approximately an hour to an hour and thirty minutes to tour our historic village.

  9. Walk-In Visitors

    WALK-IN VISITORS. Vermilionville sits on a beautiful tree-covered 23-acre site on the banks of the Bayou Vermilion with 19 attractions, including seven restored original homes with costumed artisans that provide demonstrations on crafts performed by the early settlers. Vermilionville provides its guests with a place for history, music, food ...

  10. Vermilionville Is A Living History Museum In Louisiana

    Vermilionville is open six days a week and takes under two hours to explore. Kelley A./Trip Advisor. Vermilionville is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (with the last admission at 3 p.m.) Address: 300 Fisher Road, Lafayette, LA, 70508.

  11. VERMILIONVILLE: All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

    Skip to main content. Discover. Trips

  12. Vermilionville

    882 reviews. #2 of 73 things to do in Lafayette. Historic Walking Areas. Closed now. 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Write a review. About. Get a taste of life for the 18th-century Acadian settlers in this 23-acre village with meticulously recreated period homes, costumed staff demonstrating arts and crafts and a restaurant serving Cajun and Creole food.

  13. Fun school field trip

    Vermilionville: Fun school field trip - See 881 traveler reviews, 477 candid photos, and great deals for Lafayette, LA, at Tripadvisor.

  14. Vermilion River Voyage: Everything to know about our 50-mile paddle

    Last week we embarked on the Vermilion Voyage , where about 20 people paddled 50 miles over three days down the Vermilion River. You might have a few questions about our trip (like what possessed ...

  15. Summer Camp 2024

    HOURS. Vermilionville is open six days a week, Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.. Please keep in mind that we stop taking admission at 3:00 p.m. daily as it takes approximately an hour to an hour and thirty minutes to tour our historic village.. Our historic village is closed on Mondays and for major holidays including New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, Mardi Gras Day ...

  16. Choctaw-Apache tribe of Ebarb

    The Choctaw-Apache Tribe of Ebarb is located in western Sabine Parish. Officially recognized by the state of Louisiana in 1978, Tribal members continue to live on these ancestral lands. The community is the second-largest American Indian tribe within Louisiana. Ancestors of the tribe include Choctaw bands who migrated to the area before 1800 ...

  17. Vermilionville Historic Village Review

    Directly behind the Acadian Cultural Center, this living-history village—serene and set beautifully along a bayou—re-creates the early life of the region's Creoles, Cajuns, and Native ...

  18. Vermilionville

    Mar 29, 2024 - Get a taste of life for the 18th-century Acadian settlers in this 23-acre village with meticulously recreated period homes, costumed staff demonstrating arts and crafts and a restaurant serving Caj...

  19. Welcome to Vermilionville

    HOURS. Vermilionville is open six days a week, Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.. Please keep in mind that we stop taking admission at 3:00 p.m. daily as it takes approximately an hour to an hour and thirty minutes to tour our historic village.. Our historic village is closed on Mondays and for major holidays including New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, Mardi Gras Day ...

  20. Vermilionville

    If you are seeking out a "trip back in time", you are likely to be disappointed. The overall impression of Vermilionville is an attraction that is still trying to cash in on the long-dead "Cajun" craze of the late 1980s, promoting a quaint and contrived picture of the early inhabitants of south-central Louisiana.

  21. Road Trip Through Acadiana, Louisiana's Cajun Country

    Duc in Altum leads small-group kayaking excursions and photography tours. For an immersive understanding of Acadiana's complex past, the living-history museum at Vermilionville is an essential ...

  22. Experience

    HOURS. Vermilionville is open six days a week, Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.. Please keep in mind that we stop taking admission at 3:00 p.m. daily as it takes approximately an hour to an hour and thirty minutes to tour our historic village.. Our historic village is closed on Mondays and for major holidays including New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, Mardi Gras Day ...